Lightbulb Filament Replacement

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The usual fridge and oven bulbs are among the many exceptions to the upcoming incandescent ban. Chances are, the other locations can use incandescents that are exceptions from the ban, especially if they can't use CFLs.
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Many people have outdoor flood light fixtures that have a cover on them. The cover is designed to keep the water from rain and sprinklers off the socket and base of the housing so it doesn’t short or just plain rot. There is NO fluorescent flood bulb short enough that would fit in these outdoor fixtures due to the cover. What do you propose these people do?
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I use the smaller size 15 watt and spiral cfls in them, the spiral are cheaper and light quicker. The larger 22 watt are to big
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Join the Mormons.
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Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 18:28:27 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

You probably dont want to hear my proposal, but here it is: DONT VOTE DEMOCRAT DONT VOTE REPUBLICAN DO VOTE FOR ANYONE ELSE
There, I said it, and I'm sticking to it . . . . .
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On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 02:47:53 -0500, jw wrote:
[snip]

And even better, if you have no actual preference DON'T VOTE.

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On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 04:08:50 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Did you ever try to use a CFL bulb in an unheated out building in the winter? First you're freezing your ass off when you enter the garage, you flip the light switch and get less light than a common flashlight for the first minute or two. Eventually they get brighter a little at a time. But in the coldest months of the year they never reach full brightness. So, instead of running to the garage to get that 1/2" socket and getting back to the warm house in under a minute, you spend 5 minutes freezing your ass off before you can read the numbers on the socket.
In summer my garage and other out buildings have CFL bulbs, but in winter I put back the plain old incandescents.
Then too, in some situations, florescent bulbs are just plain ugly for their color. Too much blue and they make for bad photography and are depressing to be under for hours at a time.
I DO NOT agree with the "lasts longer" part. That's just an advertising gimmick. From personal experience, I find they last the same, or often less. The oldest ones that were straight seemed to last real long. These spiral ones just dont seem to last.
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On Sep 15, 2:42 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

At 10f and below they take a long time to brighten, the floods take even longer, color wise you are using an outdated type or perhaps a off brand, try HD cfls their color is as good as incandesants. Life wise you are wrong and you get free replacements for 9 years at HD. You dont beleive me, there are 2 cfl reviews at Popular Mechanics magazine and Consumer Reports, the poor color issue was solved years ago with better Phospors, no blue, no depressing colors, but photographys issue wont ever go away and who cares, I save 75% on electricity get longer life and free bulbs when they fail.
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On 9/15/2010 3:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Not all CFLs are equal. Except for the ones in Big Lots or the dollar store. Or any bulb with America or US in the name. Those are equal trash.
I haven't replaced a CFL in a couple years. Well, I did replace a friends yesterday, it was a "Lights of America" brand.
And, as far as photography, I've looked at a lot of photography, and done some under CFL photo lamps. Way better color than a hot lamp that last only hours. They make some big big photo CFL lamps.
It rarely gets into the teens here, but it did last winter, and I had no problem with my CFL porch lamp not putting out the full light. It is a name brand enclosed lamp, and those take longer to warm up. Or, you could use a CCFL (cold cathode), instant on at any temp but lower efficiency, still much better than incandescent. I'm using one right now in my laptop.
Jeff
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Cold cathode fluorescents can be started frequently and blinked, and usually can be dimmed, and they start instantly. However, they have the same warmup needs as hot cathode ones do, because they still need a proper concentration of mercury vapor to do what they can.
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On Wed, 15 Sep 2010 02:42:56 -0500, jw wrote:

We've actually got around a 50/50 distribution of CFLs and incandescents at our place. In the last two years I can think of three incandescent failures and four CFLs, so the CFLs are actually doing a little worse (they were all bought at HD). Maybe it's the cold winters up here that kill them, or the high humidity in summer (I don't believe it's our power, because we have no problems with anything else).
Also, I have heard lots of rumors about the electronics getting cooked in the downward-pointing types and causing failures, and maybe there's some truth to that - all that ones I've had to replace have been downward- pointing.
cheers
Jules
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On Sep 15, 1:42 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

== China made CFL's vary. I have had some that didn't last a 1000 hrs....others have lasted for 5000 hrs plus. On my outside porch lights with glass covers only the 40 watt equivalent will work as the others are too long. I have used CFL bulbs down to -40 degrees with no problems although as you say it takes time to come to full intensity.
I see some bulbs advertised that looked like regular incandescent but contained CFL elements...do you know anything about those? I haven't seen them in stores around here yet. ==
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Roy wrote:

I have seen those. They tend to be "60 watt equivalent" and are more likely to be of major brands. I have seen those in a few supermarkets and at some big box home centers.
They have outer bulbs. Like other CFLs with outer bulbs, they tend to start dimmer and take longer to warm up than CFLs without outer bulbs.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

It's not a light, it's a heater. A controlled short circuit is not an efficient way to do anything.
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LSMFT

I look outside this morning and everything was in 3D!
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Correct. 11, 100w incandesants are equal to running a 1000 watt electric heater, Incandesants only put out 4-6% of energy consumed as light you can see, the rest is heat. They should be junked for the most part, they have limited use, there are better options for most needs. Now if you have free electric or subsidised cheap electric and need a cheap source of heat, then they make sense.
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On 9/14/2010 9:06 AM, ransley wrote:

Unless the light is going out the window, the energy from that is dissipated as heat as well.
Jeff
Incandesants only put out 4-6% of energy consumed as

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On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 06:06:33 -0700, ransley wrote:

Yeah, we have the heating on for 7 months of the year here, and half of that is electric baseboard anyway - I don't mind the fact that they're kicking out some heat during those months (although admittedly it's not particularly useful heat up at ceiling height)
I've really gone off CFLs in recent times. It's not just the color temperature or marketing-driven longevity and output claims, but the complexity, amounts of circuitry and plastic used, the lack of servicability (you can't just swap out the part that's actually failed, but have to ditch the whole thing) - none of that seems very 'green'. Not to mention that they're all made in far-flung lands and have to be shipped halfway around the world (but that's probably true of a lot of incandescents, too).
I'm going to hang on to my incandescents for as long as I can, I think - at least until LED technology is a viable option (and it seems to be getting better all the time).
cheers
Jules
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I remember a study that Osram did on life cycle energy usage by incandescents, CFLs, and LED bulbs. In all three types, no more than about 2% of the total was for matters other than electricity consumed during operation, such as manufacturing and disposal.
Meanwhile, in my experience, CFLs have a high rate of lasting several times longer than incandescents do. So I don't see them being all that "non-green", especially considering how much less energy they use.

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On Tue, 14 Sep 2010 21:15:54 +0000, Don Klipstein wrote:

Now that's interesting - do you have a reference or remember where you saw it? I wouldn't mind reading that - particularly to see how they define "manufacturing", i.e. whether it includes PCB fabrication/ shipping, IC fabrication/shipping etc. as things like that are probably done by other specialist plants and just bought in, rather than being done on site (often for these kinds of studies, "manufacturing" equates to "all these sub-components arrive on our doorstep, and we put them together", so they don't give the true cost of making something).

Given all the ones I've had over the years, I've found that they last about twice as long. I don't really have a handle on "cost" because although CFLs cost more to buy, they do use a lot less in terms of electricity - but I really don't have any faith at all in manufacturer's lifetime claims (or light output - a "40W equivalent" CFL never seems to give as much useful light as a 40W incandescent)

There's certainly no doubt about energy use during run-time - but it's the bigger picture that I'm concerned with. That study does sound really interesting, because an incandescent obviously uses a lot more energy during run-time, so the 2% figure means that an incandescent is *vastly* more energy-intensive to make and safely dispose of than an CFL - and that doesn't seem logical.
cheers
Jules
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In 2 lines (required by old-tech newsreader):
http://www.osram-os.com/osram_os/EN/About_Us/We_shape_the_future_of_light / Our_obligation/LED_life-cycle_assessment/index.html
The linked PDF:
http://www.osram-os.com/osram_os/EN/About_Us/We_shape_the_future_of_light / Our_obligation/LED_life-cycle_assessment/ OSRAM_LED_LCA_Summary_November_2009.pdf
That one mentions including energy used to manufacture the LEDs in the case of the studied LED bulb.

For incandescents, that may be much less than 2%. Also, energy consumption per bulb throughout its life for electricity consumption is less if the bulb's lifetime is shorter. Shorter lifetime of incandescents means more of them being manufactured, transported and disposed of.
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