Light Bulbs are getting Expensive / New Tax

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wrote:

How did the OP's statement about a supposed tax on light bulbs turn into rants about everything but? Besides, you've been trolled. There has been no national legislation passed with such a tax -- or even proposed in Congress.
TKM
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The original post was not so much a troll as it was some humor. Others just added on to it after that. Do you really think you are the only one that did not believe a $100 tax on light bulbs?
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

<Maxwell Smart voice> Would you believe a $2 tax? </MSV>
Bob
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Too many people take themselves and things they see and read on the interweb too seriously. I must now get back to bottling my new and improved troll repellent.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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wrote:

Because some of us getting fed up with this bastards that get in power and then giving rust shaft to the people generating new taxes so they can steel more from the pot Tony
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On Sep 4, 3:52 pm, snipped-for-privacy@couchmail.com wrote:

Interesting troll?????
Heard something recently as part of an international radio broadcast carried late at night by our local network that some European countries are 'pulling back' on the requirement to to do away with non- CF bulbs by mandating the use of CFLs. . Probably something of short term policy though; apparently the availability of sufficient CF bulbs will be a problem. Have previously read that Australia however is enacting or has enacted legislation concerning the mandatory use of CF bulbs.
Personally am wondering about misplaced enthusiasm; everyone jumping on the 'Use CFLs' bandwagon even though they have no concept of wattage and electrical consumption versus longer term issues.
Our local municipality for example classifies dud CFLs as 'hazardous waste', in the same category as those 48 inch fluorescent tubes and instructs its trash collectors not to take them. Not that anyone would notice one or two CFLs buried in bag of garbage! Also asked one of the staff at the regional land fill who agreed that technically CFLs and fluorescent tubes were hazardous and should treated accordingly; but also commented that when a truck or dumpster comes in (every minute or two) "We can't and don't monitor everything on it or in each bag of garbage"!
But surely there a many other aspects of electrical use in our societies that could be reviewed. Too many street lights, on all night? Is it necessary to floodlight buildings at night? During WWII for example it was amazing what savings/economies could effected.
Possibly CF lamps will have a one time effect/reduction in the amount of electricity consumed, which will be hailed as a success and proof that it's the right decision? But their manufacture may have heavier than expected effects on the environment, due to the mercury they contain, the electronic components used. At least they are supposed to last some 5 times longer while using less electricity?
A neighbour has gone almost entirely CFL; installing them in locations (at cost of several dollars each), where they will rarely be switched on! For example a rarely used basement storeroom! And claims an undefined saving in electricity; but this has been during recent mainly non heating summer months. Be interesting once winter comes since the neighbours have, like many homes here, electric heating mainly generated by hydro.
It does makes sense to use CFLs in outdoor locations (although they don't always work best in cold climates?) where the wasted heat will not be recovered and some may be on for long periods overnight. Conventional (incandescent) bulbs in this home contribute heat to our residence which directly offsets the electric heating; so it is not really wasted. Our bathroom is partially heated by the six 40 watt conventional bulbs (cost 25 cents each) which are only switched on when bathroom is in use. Most of the time the 500 watt baseboard heater rarely comes on!
Have just installed a motion detector light using two 75 watt conventional bulbs that come on virtually instantly, over where our vehicle is parked. But it is of course a more complicated gadget and will ultimately not last as long as a plain old switch while using electricity for only the few minute periods it will be on. It comes on maybe a couple of times a night, for about six-ten minutes if/when a neighbour drops by.
Interesting discussion. I must fix that vintage oil lamp by installing a new wick, just in case, by the way.
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terry wrote: ...

Of course, those same incandescents add the same heat in the warm months as well, so the benefit in the winter may be canceled by higher cooling load in the summer...
--
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Yes dpb; that could be true.
In the evenings which of course are longer in summer so lights go on later and evening is when it's almost always cool here.
So very rarely does anyone here have or use AC units (unless it is one of those reverse cycle heat pumps for heating the house in winter) and doubt even then that they would keep changing back and forth between heating and cooling modes?
Last few days of August (which we consider late summer) it's been around 15 degrees Celsius (Approx mid 60s Fahrenheit) during the day. Some 5 C, degrees cooler at night; or approx low 50s. F. No trouble sleeping! Lights go on later in summer/fall and do contribute slightly to home heat. In fact only today, Sept 6th, is it cool enough to even consider switching on any of the heating thermostats. It' s now past midday and haven't done so yet.
So we don't have any cooling load at all. Do occasionally run a dehumidifier in part of basement during the summer to keep down dampness due to warmer more humid outside air seeping in there.
Otherwise our almost completely in ground basement stays at around 55-60 deg F. most of the time, except very coldest and windiest weather when it may occasionally dip to around 50 deg. F.
You have to think in terms of a climate that never gets warm enough (or only very rarely for a few days a year at most) to need any cooling. Only a short distance from the North Atlantic this is considered a 'maritime' climate; heat and cold being modified by the mass of the ocean.
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terry wrote:

...
...
The point is it may work in your locale, but as an overall plan it may not have much net effect on reducing consumption on a more global scale...
--
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