Light bulbs

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On Sat, 28 Nov 2015 12:51:20 -0700, Don Y

That only happened once. If it wasn't for events like that, I'd have no memories of certain years. Not that I'd want a repeat. I enjoy the change of seasons.
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On 11/28/2015 5:08 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

And it was only 117F here, once. :>
I recall waiting on a street corner many years earlier (didn't live there at the time) for a friend (who lived on LSD) to pick me up. Got into his car and stuffed my fingers *into* the heater duct by the floorboard...

I enjoyed the change of seasons -- and good apples! But, I could arrange to spend my time indoors if the weather was inclement (and watch out the window as all my neighbors fought with the rain and snow). That wasn't true of most folks who had to contend with dragging themselves off to work, etc.
Now, I like the fact that I can go for a walk damn near any time of day and any day of the year -- just by opening the front door. I don't have to plan on what-ifs -- in case it chooses to rain/snow/etc. Worst case, a sudden storm will come up and drench me in the course of a block or two. But, it won't be that numbing cold rain. Rather, something warm.
And, there's so much more "going on" as the weather draws people and activities that would be too hard to plan for, elsewhere ("Will it rain and ruin our event?"). Two weeks back, a neighbor had a birthday party (outdoors) 'til the wee hours of the morning -- though I think only the brave/foolish went into the pool!
Ten days ago I was out watching shooting stars at 4AM. Would you try that in Chicago (assuming you *could* see the sky!) in mid November? Next event will be in mid February...
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wrote:

No problem . Use it in good health.
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On 11/25/2015 3:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Thanks for the info!
--
Maggie

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wrote:

The 60w is the heat shedding ability of the luminaire. With a 60w, U/L says it should still run at a (fire) safe temperature. You will not burn your house down if you use a 75w equivalent bulb that actually uses 4w or even 40w. If it was close, I would worry a lot more about the longevity of a LED or other electronic bulb running at a "safe" temperature for an incandescent. (perhaps 100-129f) At 4w I see no issue at all.
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On 11/24/2015 6:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Ahh that's good to know.

ok Thanks!
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Maggie

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wrote:

It's not the light output that limits the wattage a lamp is limited to, it's the heat - which is a function of real watts. You could put a blinding 60 watt LED in if you could find one - equivalent to well over 240 watts in light output (;umens)
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On 11/24/2015 6:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I thought I bought the 60W LED replacement bulb, but ended up buying a 75W LED. I guess they were sitting next to each other. Anyway, I ended up buying the 75W when I thought I was buying a 60W. It has 1350 lumens according to the package. So, according to what I've read in a couple other responses, I should be OK using the 75W LED replacement bulb in the 60W socket because the 75W bulb still uses less wattage (14W), right?
--
Maggie

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wrote:

You should be fine. The biggest issue with the 75w equivalent is size. I have seen some "60w only" pendant lights that would not hold the 75w CFL.
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On 11/25/2015 11:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I guess I got lucky because it fit just fine.
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Maggie

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On Wed, 25 Nov 2015 12:23:08 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I've seen 60 watt ceiling fixtures that wouldn't hols a 40 watt equivalent cfl. without changing to a longer glass.
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On Wed, 25 Nov 2015 16:56:47 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've been seeing a therapist to enable me to accept CFL's in place of real light bulbs.
Last week I asked him about teaching me to accept LEDs and he said we'd have to start at the beginning again. I feel like I've wasted 2 years and all that money for therapy. (Insurance won't pay.)
Is there some adapter I could get that would enable my acceptance of CFLs to be converted to acceptance of LEDs? Either an electrcric or an alphabetic adapter?
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wrote:

The real problem with all of the alternatives is they really only do well with a very narrow range of light wavelengths. The incandescent is a wide band emitter, all the way from infra red to the UV. It will always be closer to sunlight.
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Micky wrote:

Sounds like you are not taking enough vitamin D3 pills daily. You can take 6000iu every day in winter. Very important, again very important!!! What is your D level in your blood test? 80 Mols at least. If not do something. Also use day light bulbs in living space.
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On 11/24/2015 4:59 PM, Muggles wrote:

Yes -- with some reservations.
First, of course, if the incandescent is in a dimmable fixture, then you'd need a dimmable LED (or CFL) bulb. At the very least, you will be disappointed if you try to dim a (LED/CFL) bulb that was not designed for this form of operation.
[And, you'll probably also be disappointed if you try to dim a DIMMABLE CFL -- they suck!]
*Running* (burning?), an LED (or CFL) bulb draws considerably less power than it's "light equivalent" incandescent counterpart. So, if the light was left on forever, you could conceivably approach the "power rating" of the socket (and CIRCUIT!). Power translates into heat that is primarily dissipated in the socket.
But, lights turn on and off. And, the mechanisms that are used to turn them on/off vary. During these transitions, the electrical behavior of incandescents and LED (or CFL) differ.
There are very large, reactive currents associated with the non-incandescent alternatives. So, when driven by relays, triacs, etc. it is common for these sorts of lights to draw very large currents on startup and/or when abruptly switched off -- considerably higher than the currents that would be required for a "light equivalent" incandescent!
In many applications, the control circuitry for these lights is designed to be pretty marginal (typical "consumer" approach -- save every penny that isn't REQUIRED by the product). E.g., a 60W lamp is a tiny load so the circuitry to drive it wouldn't be as capable as, for example, a "light switch" that can typically handle a 15A (1800W) load!
Using LED/CFL in these places can cause the control circuit to fail such that the light never lights *or* never extinguishes! What's worse, instead of a burnt out bulb, you end up with a burnt out *appliance*!

Ask yourself why you really "need" more light.

Or, you can buy one of the "programmable" lights that you can change color dynamically: "Hmmm... I feel like RED for dinner, tonight..."
[I'd not recommend that (expensive) option; the bulbs in question are hackable]
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On Tue, 24 Nov 2015 18:53:00 -0700, Don Y wrote:

I agree with Don. Also, beware using LEDs as the load on a timer/motion sensor switch which does not use a neutral (white) wire. In this case, the circuit that powers the timer or sensor uses the load as a 'virtual' ground at a current insufficient to light a filament, but enough to light LEDz, albeit intermittently and dim. I did this in my garden shed (motion sensor switch) and needed to put one halogen bulb in the load or else the LEDs all flickered when they were supposed to be "off". Also, CFLs do something that is "sensed" by the motion sensor as motion.
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On 11/24/2015 8:10 PM, Mike Duffy wrote:

Oooo! I hadn't thought of that!
Many of our light switches (in the house) are illuminated (I suspect a small neon bulb?). Of course, the bulb is only lit when the switch is OFF (and there is potential across the switch's contacts THROUGH the load -- light bulb!)
So, like your comment (above), current is flowing through the CFL/LED (as it would have been for an incandescent -- but the incandescent won't light, noticeably!)
[Trivia: with these sorts of light switches, the LACK of illumination indicates the bulb(s) are dead (or, power to the circuit is out) -- for obvious reasons!]
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Mike Duffy wrote:

Only in some cases depending on what kinda sensor it is. My GDO lights, entrance hallway lights are LED and they are controlled by motion sensor. No problems. May be one has to know what he is doing?
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wrote:

As long as the motion detector has a neutral connection (white wire) and a relay it will work with just about anything. The problem is when the power to run it is scavenged through the load (no neutral). Usually they flicker when "off". The small amount of current buffers up in the little switcher power supply capacitor and discharges like a relaxation oscillator. The other thing I have seen is very low current loads may not be enough to reliably cut a solid state switching device off. I have an optical to RCA adapter on my TV that I tried to control with an SSR (off the USB port). Until I put the amplifier in the load path, it was flickering on and off too. It does not take much of an incandescent bulb (11 watts works) or a small transformer wall wart to get these things working right.
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wrote:

No. you just need to be using a motion sensor "that uses a neutral" - in other words a 3 wire device.. If you have a 2 wire device it doesn't matter how smart you are.
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