Light bulb, thy doom is near!

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On Tue, 15 Nov 2011 12:29:15 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Because it's NY. It was $3.11 yesterday, here in AL. Your taxes are, all around, 2-3x what they need to be. That's why I left the NE.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

You could drive over to Canada where gas is $109.80 (or thereabouts) per gallon or drive to Texas where it's $3.05.
The difference is taxes.
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Taxes account for much of it but not all. A large contribution is the cost of transportation to those parts of the country who want the cheap gas but don't want anything to do with refining in their own back yards.
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BobR wrote:

Gas Taxes per gallon: Canada - $0.61 - $1.15 New York - $0.32 Texas - $0.20 (Georgia has the lowest tax of all the states, less than eight cents per gallon)
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Texas gets some from the production as well. That way we are able to get back a little of what is sent to those states that don't want to deal with the dirty part of Oil and Gas.
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wrote:

http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-ticker/energy-problem-u-oil-exports-rise-174452881.html
Just as the average price for gas is set to hit $4 a gallon this week, the U.S. Energy Information Administration reports February was the third month out of four that the U.S. -- the world's most energy-hungry nation -- actually exported more oil that it imported. Despite the notion that the U.S. is currently hugely reliant on foreign oil, the country sold 34,000 more barrels of petroleum products a day than it imported in November 2010. And, in both December and February, the U.S. sold 54,000 more barrels a day. Net imports have not been negative for nearly two decades. Part of this has to do with weak U.S. demand in recent years due to the recession. The other part rests on the growing demand in our own backyard for not only crude oil, but refined oil as well. Mexico, Latin America and even OPEC member Ecuador are some of the U.S.'s top customers for fuel products, namely refined oil. Rising demand in these countries far outpaces their capacity to refine crude oil into petroleum products like gasoline or diesel fuel.
But, as Dan points out in the accompanying clip, this is not the only news item that hints at this country's ability to export energy to the rest of the world.
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harry wrote:

Duh! Build more power plants (and I don't mean wind, geothermal, or trying to run this country off of sunbeams).
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On Tuesday, November 15, 2011 5:21:44 AM UTC-5, HeyBub wrote:

Fair enoughI'm willing to bet our tech sucks up more electricity than our light bulbs.
But let's be clear: the problem is our inability/unwillingness to create the least environmentally detrimental power system. Oil and coal plants generate mega-tons of pollutants and toxic metal by-products (with no "half-life, by the way: mercury is still toxic millennia later); nuclear plants' fuel is dangerous, as is the general construction of them in, oh, I don't know, earthquake- and tsunami-prone areas; hydroelectric dams interfere with the natural flow of fish and other water life; solar requires too many acres/miles^2 to generate too little wattage; and wind farms fluctuate too much (not to mention they're going to attack us someday: http://xkcd.com/556 /)
There are two ways to tackle the issue, kinda like a home budget - increase revenue/generation or decrease spending/consumption. At least light bulbs are a step in one direction.
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Actually, Americans are more than willing to accept the new technology when it truely represents something better but totally resent having those decisions dictated to them. When a new technology reaches the point that it becomes the most viable solution, people will naturally accept it without having the government shove it up their ass. Until that point is reached, it should not be the position of government to force the issue when in many cases they are doing a great deal of harm rather than good.
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harry wrote:

That's the most bizarre thing I've heard so far today. What process could economically recover five milligrams of mercury from a CFL?
Unless you're talking about small children in Sri Lanka scraping the broken glass with a scalpel...

Who else would you have them rip off?
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wrote:

That's right. Recycling of fluorescent lamps has been done for years. The mercury, metal, phosphor and glass is recovered and used again or disposed of according to local law. I saw one article where the crushed glass was used for asphalt pavement. Lamp disposal and recycling is now a good-sized industry. Google "Lamp Recyclers".
Tomsic
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harry wrote:

But there's nothing preventing me from taking advantage of the free market, no matter how it is constructed.
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Nancy Pelosi
Want another?
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

No, your point is well taken. Immediately after I hit the "send" button, two obstacles to the free market came to mind: federal and state governments. Your observations are more specific, though.
I've got to go have a lie-down.
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I don't know about, some of the Democrats go pretty cheap.
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wrote:

Street congresscritters?
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BobR wrote:

Like a stick of gum cheap.
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oglegroups.com...
There is no "Free Market" and there never has been. The government has been screwing up the free market for decades and each time they have things have only gotten worse. You are not seeing the results of a free market, you are seeing the results of a government run by a bunch of burro-crap idiots that attempts to micromanage every aspect of the economy while not haveing enought common sense to balance their own damn checkbook.
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wrote:

Bub, you must be young. The original modems were 300 BPS As late as the 80s, the standard business modem was 1200 or 2400 BPS and the 9600 BPS modem was leased line only.
What really broke open the market was a series of anti-trust judgements against Ma Bell in court. The first step was forcing them to allow other companies equipment on common carrier lines but Ma still required that you had to rent a DDA coupler from them to connect it. Eventually they had to allow a "compliant" customer owned coupler.
The end was when the court broke up ATT.
That was what allowed the online services to become a consumer service and what created the vast array of telephone products we take for granted today. Without this breakup the internet would still be an obscure DARPA network with a few thousand users
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I wish I was young. An actual federal regulation prohibited modems from working at the speeds over (if I remember) 56K.
Even today, most modems operate at 2400 BPS. And there are millions of them. (Think ATM machines).
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