light bulb question

We bought twelve can lights at Home Depot. Then found out they didn't sell the bulbs. They are a goofy variety, and all they sell are the spots and the expen$ive halogens.
I have located some online, and the first company I ordered from didn't even ship. grrrrrrrrrrr. Anyway, they are a 40wMEDR16FL, which translates to 40 watt, medium base (standard light bulb size) R16 size flood. I can find the spots and halogens locally. I can order the 40 watt floods. I think.
I have seen some online that have neomydium in them and are purported to be close to natural sunshine. Anyone have any experience with them? Anyone have any experience with these bulbs? Should I pay the extra for the neomydium or the halogens? What about the heat from the halogens? Should I just get the plain vanilla floods? These will be for a kitchen, so we wanted the floods rather than the spots.
TIA
Steve
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From my past experience the halogens did not last as long as the standard floods. I have seen the compact florescent floods, but have not tired any. I would guess that if they are bright enough, the advantage would be that they would last a long time.
I am using standard 15 Watt compact florescent lamps in our kitchen, bathroom, and a few other places. I am up to about 6 years with them now, and they are still working very well. Their light output is supposed to be something like 50 to 60 Watts.
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I can't comment on your can lights but I have a number of Lightolier cans in my home which I suspect are similar. We initially put in the specified lamps only to discover that they were positioned so deep into the can that the lighting was poor. I have ended up using lamp extenders to move the lamp down.
https://secure.tcinternet.net/buylighting/shoppingcart/socket_extension.html
Currently I am using HD halogen floods as I replace lamps. Over all I'm not happy with the illumination considering that I paid a lighting designer through my architect to design the lighting.
RB
SteveB wrote:

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Neodymium refers to a bluish tinting of the glass that causes a gap (or pair of gaps) in the yellow portion of the spectrum.
The color is not close to that of sunlight, but closer to that of halogen light. Since the spectrum has more red and green than that of a regular halogen or an overvoltaged incandescent of the same overall color, neodymium bulbs have an effect of making most red and green objects and some other colored objects more vivid than "normal".
I would generally recommend against neodymiums because they produce less light than non-neodymium bulbs of the same wattage and life expectancy.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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