Light bulb question

In our kitchen we have two ceiling light fixtures with 60 watt max. labeled on the fixture. I presume this is for the heat. I'm wondering if in those fixtures one can use a 100 watt flourescent screw in like the ones at Lowes and other places. Thanks.
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Paul O.
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Yes, if it fits

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Depends on the fixture style. Many of the CFs are to be used with open type fixtures with shades, not one that has a cover enclosing the bulb.
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Some CFs are position sensitive,too;marked "use in vertical position only."
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Jim Yanik
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Yes, I noticed that today while looking at the 100 watters at Lowes, hadn't noticed it before. We currently have a 60 watt equivelent in each fixture. The wife complains it's too dark in there.
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Paul O.
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I've always disliked the color of the light from CF because everything had a greenish cast to it. Consequently, I don't use but two of them. I was in a place last week that had them and the light was a very white, almost daylight color. No one knew what brand they were but I'd much rather use them as it was much more natural and brighter looking.
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Edwin they are called Daylight CFs. Most stores have them now.
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Other than the Sylvania CFs (actually what I would call "semi-warm white"), "Daylight" fluorescents are icy cold pure white to slightly bluish white that most find causing a "dreary" effect at typical home lighting levels.
What I think are good are 3500K, "whiter shade of warm white": Sylvania's "daylight" CFs (Lowes), and N:Vision "Bright White" (Home Depot). There are others, but these are the main retail-available ones with screw bases.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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If you find CFs greenish, then I think you would like most of the Sylvanias - many of which are available at Lowes. I find Sylvania in recent years to be "erring to purplish-pinkish" (opposite of greenish).
If you mix CFs and incandescents, you will usually see some color difference of one kind or another. If you mix different brands and/or models of CFs, you may see a color difference among them.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Paul O. wrote:

First I assume that you are talking about a lamp labeled as having the same light output as a 100 W lamp and not a 100W fluorescent lamp. :-)
Most will work fine, just keep the total wattage (not equivalent light output) below the fixture's rating. Some CF are not rated for enclosed fixtures so you will want to check on that for the specific lamp you are using.
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Joseph Meehan

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I just installed some Copper lighting Halo`` (new construction, insulated construction) fixtures, and the wattages that can be used were dependant on the numerous baffles available. There were about 10 options, with colours, rings, mirrored, inset, eyeball, extended, swivelling, water proof, etc. options. It depends on the baffle. Some baffles are almost identical, looking identical, but for an extra 50% in price, I think the overall thickness of the plastic was literally a few hundred-thousandths of an inch thicker. However, wrt the CF vs. std. bulb characteristics, and heat, I do not know. I am now more attuned to the ratings of fixtures and electricity in general - the heat is pretty freakin serious.

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whoops, a few ``hundredths`` of an inch thicker.
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wrote:

A 60 watt lamp of any kind will generate 60 watts of heat. A 100 watt lamp of any kind will generate 100 watts of heat. Use a 60 watt fluorescent lamp, provided there is no dimmer on the circuit.
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For years we used "Watts" to talk about relative brightness of bulbs, With new technologies, we should probably use Lumens. The ration of Watts?Lumens varies considerably. My guess is that the OP is talking about an equivalent, but we don't know that.
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Phisherman wrote:

Overall that is true, but the heat in the fixture is only 60 watts less the light that exits the fixture.

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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Also on the heat radiated out of the fixture. Was included in a thread on this newsgroup March: http://tinyurl.com/2yvwgg particularly Don Klipstein and Victor Roberts (both lighting experts) The the heat from an incandescent radiates better than the heat from a CFL because of the wavelengths.
And in another thread Don had recommendations for maximum wattage for CFLs in a 60W fixture: http://tinyurl.com/3bqum6
Regarding color in a post by Edwin, Don has recommendations on that too: http://tinyurl.com/243c2b including brands.
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Well that's not true. The key is that the CF converts more of the electricity into light instead of heat, hence being more energy efficient.
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Except for what gets through the windows, the light becomes heat. Generally, all lightbulbs are close to 100% efficient at heating your home. If you are not trying to heat your home or if you are heating your home with heating more economical then electric resistive heating, then you want more efficient lighting.
As for heating of the fixture: This gets different. Incandescents produce a lot of infrared, which largely avoids heating the fixture although this heats your home. CFs have their "waste" being mainly convected/conducted heat, which impacts the fixture more on its way to heating your home.
I had an 8 inch globe warm up slightly more with a 42 watt CF than with a 60 watt incandescent.
Furthermore, CFs are less tolerant of heat than incandescents are. In a small enclosed fixture or a downlight rated for 60 watt max incandescent, 23 watt CF may be pushing things if it's not something good in such places like non-dimmable Philips SLS. Otherwise 15-19 watts or so CF (60-75 watt incandescent equivalent) could be the most that does not have life shortened a lot by the heat.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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I had a 42 watt compact fluorescent (150 watt incandescent equivalent) heat up a fixture slightly more than a 60 watt incandescent does. The reason: CFs produce little infrared, which mostly escapes the fixture. CFs have their main output other than visible light being convected/conducted heat.
A 60 watt incandescent will heat your home more than a 42 watt CF will, but these are fairly equal at heating the fixture.
Keep in mind that if heat builds up around the ballast section of a CF, CFs of more than maybe 19 watts (75 watt incandescent equivalent) can easily have shortened life in a fixture rated for 60 watt incandescent. Mainly in downlights and small enclosed fixtures.
For that matter, there is even such a thing as CFs rated specifically to take the thermal punishment of recessed ceiling fixtures (Example - Philips SLS non-dimmable up to 23 watts).
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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