Light bulb keep on burning out

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BTW a good volt meter would tell you with one reading if this was happening
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If the light is the only thing on that side of the float, and if it is turned off, then nothing will function. However while someone may only know of one item on the circuit, usually there is more than one. Same deal on the other side. If the two sides are balanced then both sides get normal voltage and current, but that seldom happens. Often voltage changes as loads vary so while it may appear normal some times, at others it may be running at twice the rated voltage or zero.
This is a real thing, not a something someone thought up in their head. Just because you did not think of an additional load on that circuit in addition to the lamp does not mean there is not one. That is the whole reason for codes, to protect all of us from our own ignorance.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Another possibility:
The metal tab at the base of the socket could be pushed down from over-tightening a previous bulb, such that there exists an air gap between the tab and the base of the replacement bulb, causing current arcing, which then causes premature bulb failure.
Turn the circuit breaker off to the socket, use needlenose plyers to reach in and gently raise the metal tab to its original position.
Do not overtighten new light bulb.
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On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 20:52:07 -0400, Dimitrios Paskoudniakis

bullshit. You can't push the contact so far in that it loses contact with an inserted light bulb. There's the bottom of the socket behind the contact. All an overtightened light bulb will do is squeeze the contact between the light bulb and the bottom of the socket.
Your suggestion is likely to product the arcing you are trying to eliminate by separating the contact from the bottom of the socket and producing a loose contact.
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wrote in message...

The contact at the bottom of the socket is designed to act as a spring to keep good contact between it and the lamp. They certainly can become flat and lack that spring action and then with the expansion and contraction of temperature changes you can get poor connections and arcing causing problems. The advice not to _over_tighten is valid and should be followed.

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wrote in part:

I have caused this problem myself many years ago. Not all sockets are made so that the tab is stopped from moving further by socket structure before it is out of reach of some or many lightbulbs.
There is another thing to chek for: The tab may be corroded. Arcing may corrode the tip contact of lightbulbs. Sometimes the corrosion is easy enough to scrub off with fine sandpaper (with the breaker off - verify that flipping the breaker on and off turns that socket on and off).
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Hey Mr. Bullshit, check http://www.askthebuilder.com/EM0017_Light_Bulbs_Burn_Out_Quickly.shtml
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On Thu, 13 Mar 2008 19:00:15 -0400, Dimitrios Paskoudniakis

Why don't you take a reading comprehension course? The article states that if you don't tighten the socket, the bulb can ark and the solder at the base OF THE BULB can melt. It doesn't state that there is anything wrong with tightening the bulb fully or that you should leave it a little loose. It states quite the opposite.
"You will quickly notice that the bottom of most light bulbs has a small droplet of solder in the center of the base. More importantly the size of this drop of solder is not consistent from light bulb to light bulb. It is close in size, but not always the same size or height.
If the brass tab at the base of the socket does not make firm contact with the bottom of the light bulb, a small electrical arc can happen that starts to melt the solder. Over a period of time, the solder can deform and the gap between the solder and the brass tab gets larger."
The rest of the article repeats the idiotic advice of reaching in and bending the tab. It is a non-sequitir. Pulling the tab away from the bottom of the socket will result in a poorer connection.
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wrote:

HOO BOY!!!
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Maybe you oughta stick to topics on which you have some actual knowledge. Bending the tab away from the bottom of the socket results in a *better* connection, not worse.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Because it's never happened to you, it must be impossible, eh?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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In forty years? Yes.
The technology is far older and unchanging because it works, is cheap, and there's little reason to change it. You don't have a tab hanging in mid air to contact the lightbulb.
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wrote:

... unless you do!
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wrote: ...

I have 20 years on you and maybe in the next twenty you will see it, I have.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Guess again, pal. It *does* happen, and just because you've never seen it, does *not* mean that it can't happen.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I'm the OP and found the problem the other day, turns out the bulbs were not burned out after all. The screw in socket was very tight so the bulb was not able to seat completely down to make electrical contact - properly do to rust from the salty air. The property is located close to the Pacific Ocean. A little Vaseline on the thread and pulling the hot center tap out a little bit had solved the problem. Regarding the salty air, I also needed to replace the exterior door bell button once every three or so years as the contact fail to conduct due to corrosion.
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