Light bulb keep on burning out

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Same here, and most of them have a lot of burned out and flickering LEDs. I thought they would last longer han this.
Jimmie
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MythBusters did a short segment regarding light bulbs.
Lights On or Off
Myth: You save on energy bills by leaving lights on. Some people believe that the energy to turn on lights exceeds savings of turning lights off.
They talked to Mark Reisfelt, manager of the Independent Electric Supply where they purchased their light bulbs. He felt that it was best to turn the lights off.
To test the myth, they needed to measure energy usage during startup, maintenance (steady state), and shutdown.
For steady state energy consumption, they turned on several different types of bulbs for 60 minutes and measured their consumption using a Kill A Watt: * Incandescent 90 Wh * Compact Fluorescent (CFL): 10 Wh * Halogen: 70 Wh * Metal halide 60 Wh * LED: 1 Wh * Fluorescent: 10 Wh
For startup energy consumption, Grant hooked up an inductive current loop to a computer and measured the amount of energy used when the turned on the bulbs. With an inductive current loop, you run a wire through the center, which induces a current in the loop. This current is then measured by a digital sampling oscilloscope.
Based on the amount of energy consumed turning on the bulb, they were able calculated how long the bulb would have to be turned off in order to make it worth the energy savings, i.e. "It's best to turn off the bulb if you are leaving the room for":
* Incandescent: 0.36 seconds * CFL: 0.015 seconds * Halogen: .51 seconds * LED: 1.28 seconds * Fluorescent: 23.3 seconds
In other words, its almost always best to turn the bulb off. Even the 23 seconds for the fluorescent lights isn't very long, and the rest of the times are pretty much blinks of an eye. Bulb Longevity
They tested one final element of this myth: frequently turning lights on and off decreases their life span, thus leading to greater costs. Grant setup a timer and relay to turn the bulbs on and off repeatedly every 2 minutes. After six weeks, only the LED bulb was still working. Based on this test, they extrapolated that it would take five years of ordinary usage to cause the bulbs to burn out.
* busted * Side-note: 105-year bulb
Grant and Kari visited the Livermore/Pleasanton Fire Department to view their light bulb that has been burning for 105 years. It has a carbon filament that is much thicker than modern bulbs and also burns much cooler/darker. You can check on the light using the bulb's webcam.
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The 23.3 seconds is more than the actual truth for fluorescents. Fluorescent fixtures that draw increased current during starting also have their power factor reduced during starting, and the above setup appears to me to measure only current consumption.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Fluorescents and HID lamps (such as metal halide) do suffer wear from starting. Halogen and HID lamps can also age badly if they spend a lot of "on time" incompletely warmed up.
2 weeks being on half the time is 504 hours. Many incandescents are only rated to have average life expectancy of 750 hours.

I have seen the webcam picture. Based on this and web searching, I suspect teh filament is indeed running at an unusually low temperature, and with much less energy efficiency than that of modern incandescents.
You can get 230V lightbulbs. Some electrical/lighting supply places, as well as online outfits such as bulbs.com, sell them. At 120V, they should easily last a century. A 200W 230V lightbulb at 120V consumes about 75 watts, and produces about 2/3 the light output of better 40 watt 120V incandescents. A "century bulb" is easy to achieve, but no bargain.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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It could be that what I am seeing isnt a direct failure of the LED but there are 12 traffic signals from my house to work and 4 of them have sections that are out or flcikering and these lights are only about a year old. Of course this could represent the failure of only few LEDS in a few thousand as I imagine the LEDS are probably arrange in series /paralell clusters where if oneLED failed several others would also be taken out.
Jimmie
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On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 04:35:20 -0700, " Frank"

Inspect the socket and check the voltage.
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Get an electrician to take a look at it. Possibly a short. I;d also recommend to start using CFCs http://bigcountryhomepage.com/phpBB2/index.php

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On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 11:22:23 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Its a lot easier and cheaper just to replace the socket. See if that helps.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd like to hear your explanation of how "a short" acts to burn out a light bulb.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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There's stray wire running from the 440 up at the telephone pole down to his light socket. Funny how nobody has noticed it before.
Seriously, the primary causes of short incadescent light bulb lifespan are      1) too much voltage (an AC voltmeter can check this)      2) too much heat      3) too much vibration (unfrosted bulbs can handle heat and vibration better as they run cooler)      4) poor quality light bulbs.
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Vibration Moisture Poor contacts Heat in an enclosed fixture Wrong lamp for the fixture Halogen lamp installed without making sure there are no finger prints on it.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Missed an important one
A floating neutral. This is a serious safety issue. It can cause a fire. It should have been listed first.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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symptoms that, in the absence of those other symptoms, it does not merit consideration when the only observed symptom is short bulb life in a *single* socket.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

I disagree. If that floating neutral is pairing one light bulb say with a refrigerator it it may not cause an apparent symptoms on the other line but it can still be a danger and a cause.
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Sure, that's a typical circuit: refrigerator, *one* light fixture, and nothing else. Uh-huh.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

While I have seen such a circuit more than once, especially with freezers, where owners want to make sure the power is still on, I did not indicate both the lamp and the frig on the same circuit, but rather paired on opposite legs of two circuits sharing a neutral. My answer would also apply if many other items were on that same circuit pair, but if the other devices were not sensitive to voltage swings or were not high amp users.
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--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

with" - an illustration. There are lots of possibilities of 2 circuits with loose common neutral. Like 2 general purpose circuits with a light on one and a heater on the other. Doesn't have to be only a light on one circuit, just that the light be all that is on, or as Joseph wrote, all that is sensitive.
--
bud--

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If the unbalanced load of one circuit is going thru the lamp and burning it out, where is it going when the light is off?
You should have lights and appliances. When the appliances are off where is it going?
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