Light bulb keep on burning out

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Tenant said they have to replace the light bulb in one of the rooms because it keeps on burning out. Its incandescent on a 120V circuit, any ideas? No such problem in other rooms.
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bad socket thats overheating and thats a safety fire risk issue.
or the fixture could be over lamped, with too may watts in it.
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Excessive vibration, loose contacts in socket, tenant plays basketball in house and keeps hitting the light fixture. Change the light fixture or try a rough service bulb.
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or a 130 volt bulb, or compact fluroscent.
my guess bad over heating socket
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Frank wrote:

They should turn it off once in a while.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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On Mar 12, 8:15�am, "Blattus Slafaly � � 0/00 :)"

actually off and on a lot is worse than just leaving lamp on, its a thermal stress issue
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Actually, in most incandescent lamps, cold starts don't do much actual damage with the jarring they do to the filament. What mainly happens is that an aging filament develops a thin hot spot, which experiences a temperature overshoot during a cold start.
Cold starts will kill aging filaments. However, avoiding cold starts does little to make filaments last longer - by the time they become unable to survive a cold start, the hot/thin spot is in a state that is reinforcing its thinness at a rate that is accelerating worse than exponentially - and the filament's hours are numbered no matter what.
Those thermistor-based soft-starting devices don't do much protection via soft-starting. I did an experiment and found that one of these, fully warmed up, dimmed the lightbulb enough to extend its life by about 50%.
Keep in mind the life expectancy of traffic signal incandescents in traffic signal use.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Mar 12, 9:36�pm, snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

long life, if thats what you want put the incandescent on a dimmer, dimmers even run at full voltage lose a few and lamp life skyrockets. the inside of the bulb will actually get black dimming the still burning lamp to the point you will want to replace it/
years ago i had a dimmer on a 300 watt light bulb for my elderly grandma.
300 watt so she could see good to read, low wattage for watching tv. about every 6 months i would replace the lamp its insides black.
that was OK a 300 watt without dimmer would last at most 2 months, high wattage equals short life.
today compact fluroscents are a far better choice
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Perhaps that particular light fixture is turned on and off a lot. If that's the case, the only light bulb that will alst is a LED type (which aren't widely available yet and don't come in high enough wattages to be useful yet).
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A 130V or heavy-duty design bulb will almost certainly solve the problem unless there is an actual problem in the fixture or circuit itself (which we can't tell from here).
--


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130V, superlonglife and inductrial/shock/vibration duty incandescents also produce less light for the amount of electricity consumed than "standard" incandescents, generally 15-25% less. Use CFLs where you can.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Don Klipstein wrote:
...

They'll solve OP's problem though, which was the point of the posting.
I personally can't stand the fluorescent light where I want incandescent, efficiency or no efficiency. That's me, though and I'll be the first to admit to being an old fogey...
--
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I know what you mean, I dont mine fluorescent lighting for general illumination but for any type of task lighting I want incandescent. There is an exception to this. At work we have 3 phase power in the building and when the lights in the room are split among the three phases it doesnt bother me.
Jimmie
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Jeff Wisnia posted for all of us...

They are "Traffic Signal Bulbs" believe it or not. Also used in airway obstruction lights such as towers, chimneys. Rated for 3000 hours iirc
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older traffic light bulbs were special heavy duty lamps run at a slightly lower voltage. have seen the bulbs, they were big on mechanical strength.
traffic lights have tough lives, vibration from passing trucks, impacts, extreme weather, etc etc.
a fellow who fixed them said voltage didnt just snap off and on, it ramped up and was never completely off, which backed up a lamp assembly i saw one nite, it had opened somehow and the off color positions were glowing very slightly. would f never been seen with the colored glass in place
note the newer LED lamps, when they fail area go out, rather than the entire lamp
not long ago I saw a hanging traffic lamp broken from its mount, spinning in the wind. big storm going on
I called 911 immediately if that fell thru a windshield someone could get hurt bad. a hour or two later i passed the intersection on the way home the lamp assembly was gone.
the tech must of hated me, he had to do that in a severe storm
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have seen inside the controller boxes for traffic signals in Philadelphia, back when they used incandescents for all colors. They use mechanical switching - voltage does not ramp up.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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I have seen them with a ballast resistor in series with them. The ones I remember used a cam to activate switches. The cam was driven by a ratchet device amd soleniod. It might take 3 or 4 ratchets before anything changes.
Jimmie
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I doubt that they could "ramp" the current very easily back in the pre-solid state electronics days. But maybe they just used resistors across the switch contacts on the one you saw? That would keep the filament warmer during the "off" periods.
And, the electricity "wasted" that way was MUCH cheaper in those good 'ol days.
Jeff
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Traffic lights with incandescents use "traffic signal lamps". Most of those are rated for 8,000 hours and there are 130V versions.
I have heard a bit about blinking signs and "chaser light" signs having a "keep warm" current to reduce thermal shock, or that the filaments don't cool enough to run into thermal shock problems. I have my doubts about keep-filament-warm means since cold starts are generally not as damaging as people think, and any such current would make "off" lamps glow in signs that have most the lamps burned out - and I don't see that happening. Traffic signals don't have any "low current" to keep the filament warm - or else drop-in LED replacements would glow somewhat when they are "off".
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Thu, 13 Mar 2008 02:36:47 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:
[snip]

I notice that all (or almost al) traffic signals around here use LED arrays.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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