Light Bulb Filament Repair Kits

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How come no one sells kits to replace the filaments in incandescent light bulbs?
Until they do, I guess we're stuck with this crap. http://www.richsoil.com/CFL-fluorescent-light-bulbs.jsp
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote in

Is this a serious question?
You can't replace the filament because the glass is blown in place in/on the base with the filament inside. You therefore can't remove the glass from the base without fracturing it.
Incandescents cost about a quarter apiece before the environuts got involved in lighting. No point in trying to repair something that cheap.
--
Tegger

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On Tuesday, April 26, 2011 at 5:15:20 PM UTC-7, Tegger wrote:

when I was a kid, I remember seeing a TV commercial about laser beam incandescent lightbulb filament repair, but it was for very large, very sports stadium bulbs. It may have been a General Electric commercial, like the kind they air for their jet engines, MRI machines -- you know, things that average families buy every day.
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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 21:48:26 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

The solution would be to install a very small remote controlled welder inside each incandescent light bulb. Then when the bulb burns out, the owner could use his remote, turn on the welder, and weld the filament back together, without ever having to open the glass enclosure. The remote would need a joystick control, so the operator could position the welding rods precisely at the filament break.
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On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 02:55:18 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

a fan over the opening, like they do at supermarket doors, so the vacuum wouldn't leak out.
Or refill after welding with ArNe, which is a better gas than vacuum gas anyhow.
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wrote:

Geeezzzzz, I thought you just needed to hold a vacuum cleaner hose by the incision on the glass to get the vaccuum back in the bulb.... :)
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On Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:07:18 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Wouldn't that suck the vacuum out? Then it would have no vacuum.
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On 01/28/2015 05:59 PM, micky wrote:

<snip>

Thanks for the warning.
I was in fact going to do that but failed in my attempt and I was going to try later. My system suffered a multiple chain reaction:
Seems the metal case on my vacuum cleaner shorted to ground which in turn shorted the fuse out.
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Your ladybug comments are right on. We have a couple of my wife's dresser lamps on the touch sensitive circuits that you can buy at a hardware store. I put them in her lights for exactly the reason that it was MUCH easier t o turn on by touching rather than reaching up under the shade and turning t he switch. Her lights started going on at seemingly random times, we disco vered it was ladybugs...
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That 25,000 hour 100 watt incandescent almost certainly produces less light than a 750 hour 75 watt once. At national average electricity cost of over 11 cents per KWH, the 25 watt difference costs over $2 for 750 hours. Superlonglife incandescents don't pay except where there is a labor cost issue in replacing them.
Meanwhile, I am happy about how long the CFLs in my bathroom are lasting.
My experience with a light meter differs from that mentioned in the link above. I am happy with the light output from my CFLs.
And where do they get this figure of CFLs using 20x their rated power for a whole second when turned on? That is definitely not true.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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"And where do they get this figure of CFLs using 20x their rated power for a whole second when turned on? That is definitely not true."
Yes, CFL's and fluorescents in general have a massive surge consumption whe n initially turned on. They also contain dangerous chemicals like mercury a nd cadmium that must be disposed of in a very scientific manner. When using renewable energy and safe nuclear energy, incandescents are by far the bes t lightbulb for the environment.
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On 01/27/2015 01:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@rocketmail.com wrote:

I don't know where your post came from but with incandescents, I find it best to drain the vacuum out of them once a year and fill them up with new.
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On 1/27/2015 3:27 PM, philo wrote:

Refill them with xenon or krypton and they outlast CFL's.
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On 01/27/2015 02:31 PM, Frank wrote:

Great idea but now I've wreaked the filament... anyone have a schematic diagram? I have an extensive repair lab here and may be able to cobble together a fix.
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On Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 1:31:40 PM UTC-7, Frank wrote:

In the 1960s or 1970s, Westinghouse started to sell incandescent bulbs that were sort of cylindrical rather than spherical, and they were filled with krypton to make them last longer than more common argon filled bulbs:
https://img1.etsystatic.com/002/1/5700633/il_570xN.379226443_iz95.jpg .
My parents bought tons of them because the light was whiter than that from other bulbs. I think they still have some, and I do mean the ones actually made by Westinghouse in the USA, not the bulbs currently made by a Chinese manufacturer that bought rights to the brand. Those bulbs did last longer but not nearly as long as fluorescent tubes.
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On 1/27/2015 3:27 PM, philo wrote:

And if you're on a 2-phase center-tap transformer, it wouldn't hurt to swap the polarity of the bulbs occasionally.
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On 01/27/2015 03:27 PM, philo wrote:

And don't forget to check that the vacuum cylinder from which you refill the bulbs has the EPA mark showing that the contents are compliant with the latest regulations. I've read that some unscrupulous vendors are selling expired vacuum as still usable.
Perce
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On 1/28/2015 4:04 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

That, and some vendors don't put any thing in the bottle. Shows up empty, and you have no recourse to gt the vacuum you paid for.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 01/28/2015 03:04 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Worse still:
Those cans of vacuum you get on eBay and when they arrive...are empty!
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On 01/27/2015 01:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@rocketmail.com wrote:

https://www.1000bulbs.com/product/54666/IN-L4099.html
the above are reproduction of the so-called Marconi bulbs.
I have them in one of my antique light fixtures.
In the old days when the filament broke ...with the bulb energized one could tap on it and the loose elements would weld together and the bulb would work again.
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