Lifting porch roof to r&r columns

Hiya Folks, I need to raise up the roof of a porch a bit to get old columns out and new ones in. I was hoping to use the type of jacks I see (and used ages ago) on concrete pours to plumb up the forms. Basically was thinking of attaching a 4x4 to each end of the jack and then be able to turn the turnscrew in the center to raise and lower the roof. First question: What are these called? 2nd: Can I do this or am I asking for trouble? Next, if these are not recommended for use, then I suspect I'll be heading the bottle jack route which is fine but I'll have to do each one individually as I don't have 4 bottle jacks (number of colums to be removed). Thanks for any inputs. Cheers, cc
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Lally Column?
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/supplement/floor/joist1/raising.htm
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That's not a Lally column. Lally is a trademarked name, and the one in that article is a post jack (generic term), which is different than a Lally column. You did point the guy in the right direction, though.
The OP can use a hydraulic bottle jack, a car scissor jack, a post jack, a railroad jack or simply use a 4x4 at an angle and some wedges. A porch roof doesn't have much weight, and each jacking point would probably be bearing a few hundred pounds or so - probably wouldn't be as high as a quarter ton.
I Googled this: jacking up a porch roof to replace a column
and came up with this as the very first link: http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/repair/porch/beam13/replace.htm
R
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That's not a Lally column. Lally is a trademarked name, and the one in that article is a post jack (generic term), which is different than a Lally column. You did point the guy in the right direction, though.
The OP can use a hydraulic bottle jack, a car scissor jack, a post jack, a railroad jack or simply use a 4x4 at an angle and some wedges. A porch roof doesn't have much weight, and each jacking point would probably be bearing a few hundred pounds or so - probably wouldn't be as high as a quarter ton.
I Googled this: jacking up a porch roof to replace a column
and came up with this as the very first link: http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/repair/porch/beam13/replace.htm
R
Yup, saw that one before I posted. They use a bottle jack. I was hoping to avoid buying 4-5 bottle jacks to do this. I have to lift the entire roof (approx. 24') at the same time and leave it there long enough to dig new footings, pour concrete, and install new posts. This is also 150 miles from my home so chances are of me getting all of this done in a weekend is slim so I want something that I can put in place and not worry about it lowering the roof (ie. I worry about that with bottle jacks). Cheers, cc
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Jack it up, insert 4x4s, and lower it on them.
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wrote:

http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/framecarp/supplement/floor/joist1/raising.htm
Thanks. Those would work. I really don't want to purchase as this is a once off deal. I'll check with the rental places to see if they carry them. Thanks. cc
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How tall is the column? What is the diameter or dimensions.
Typically I'll just cut some 2x4 or 4x4's a little longer than the post length. Wedge it in than hammer the bottom to wedge it vertically raising the beam above a tad and removing the weight from the post. Use a couple per post for a warm-fuzzy. Screw or toenail top and bottom is best.
Ones I've done have only been 8-10ft and were 4x4 posts being replaced. Holding a lot of weight but not some huge amount.
Bottle jacks: 2-ton ones at Borg for $20. Harbor Freight $10. I can see your temp support post popping out off the bottle jack. Using the post metod I mentioned, all you have to worry about is the two ends.
Just my .02. Heed replies from others with more extensive experience.
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Red Green wrote:

I second this suggestion. It's the method I use on Habitat for Humanity builds to remove temporary posts and put in a permanent 6x6 cedar post.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
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Post is about 10 ft and is in two sections. One section runs from the beam overhead to the top of the deck and the other piece runs from just under the decking to the ground. This idea would work and I may go this route. I'll have to get additional ply as there's nothing but dirt under the deck but that shouldn't be too hard. Thanks! cc
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If nothing around the house that's handy and would fit the bill then first thought is to put some concrete cap blocks for foot. They are solid and like 4x8x16. $1.50-2.00 and pretty much a staple item at the Borg.
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I just layed a 4x4 on the deck, across the joists, another at the top, and another between the top one and the lifting part of an automotive floor jack laying on the bottom one. You can prop it with more 4x4s after you get it lifted.
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Thanks. I may be able to use this idea as well. I have to demo the deck but perhaps I can do this from the ground up. Cheers, cc
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