leveling a floor


I have 1929 house on a stone/concrete foundation and plaster walls. I'm working on leveling the floor in one of the rooms. It's impossible to level this just with jacking as it will cause unevenness elsewhere.
I've got a drop of nearly an inch over about 3' I'd like to correct (or at least minimize). I will be laying laminate (IKEA Tundra) over the floor. I'm thinking some combination of shims and leveling compound.
Recommendations or ideas?
Jeff
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An inch is a lot, but not uncommon in older houses. Assuming it is sag and not built with a pitch, I'd start with at least minimal jacking. It should be done over time, little by little. It may take a few supports to get it right. To give a really good recommendation, someone would have to see the problem to offer proper advice.
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On 8/15/2010 10:35 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I've got three jacks (the new jacks look like junk compared to the old) under that beam and have been jacking it a bit at a time. The right side is the foundation wall and my goal has been to level that line and it nearly is now. If I were to jack more I'd have a slope down towards the foundation wall, and I don't think I want that. Got a Ryobi self leveling laser (love it) and I've graphed out the supports and height differences... The room is about 16 feet long and drops about 2" over that, it's just the last couple feet I want to fix (refrigerator and base cabinets on it). My thinking is that house building in '29 was a little non standard!
Jeff
It

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It might be worth your time to consult a competent structural engineer/ architect. He may even suggest some clever rebuilding of the part of the subfloor to grade as an alternative. The fundamental problem may be foundation settling, but if it is stable after all these years, changing something else will be more cost effective. Good luck.
Joe
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If there is an exposed crack in the slab/foundation, you might consider injecting/pouring some termite control/treatment, in there, before installing your flooring.
Sonny
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