Level Granite counter tops

We just had new granite counter tops installed and are mostly very pleased with the results. The one minor area of concern is where the two slabs meet and form a seam. Visualy they did a good job but you can feel that there is a slight difference in height from one slab to the other. It is probably only the thickness of a piece of paper in difference but when you pass your hand over it or slide a wine glass or coffey cup over it there is a clunk. They did send a guy back once to "finish" the seam and he did smooth it out quite a bit but I'm wondering if that's as good as he can get it? I don't know what is possible with granite or how difficult it is to do something like this. If it is a really big deal and some height variation from slab to slab is expected then I'm ok with it but If it possible I would like to have the two sections even. At the back of the seam they are even and it makes for a nice transition, very smooth and no clunking as glasses and cups pass over it. The fellow who did the seam work didn't seem to like doing it. Which is always a bad sign.
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Hobo wrote:

Call the contractor back. It is their responsibility to do it right.
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Hobo wrote:

Word. Unhappy campers make poor workers.
A piece of paper is about 4 thousanths of an inch - .004" That should be able to be polished out fairly easily. But it's definitely nitpicking.
R
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Your talking about a piece of rock it's pretty hard to get it perfect. We have the same situation in our kitchen doesn't bother me
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I'm willing to live with it. I would just like to know if a reputable contractor would consider this nit picking or a reasonable request. It may be only .004 of an inch but it stands out because everything else is so smooth. I don't work with granite so I don't know what is acceptable and what isn't. Any one have a professional opinnion or had a similar situation?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I already gave you my professional opinion. It can be ground down and it is nitpicking. Be aware that, depending on the skill of the craftsman doing the work, hand work can leave a surface that might have as high of a polish as the surrounding stone, but not be dead flat with that smooth mirror like reflection. As a friend was fond of saying, "The enemy of good is better."
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I prefer "the enemy of perfect is good enough".
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Travis Jordan wrote:

Two sides of the same coin. Trick is getting it to stand on edge where you've done exactly enough work to get it right.
There is also no such thing as perfect.
R
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Hobo wrote:

If your cups or glass clunk against the seam, I guarantee that the bump is more than .003-.004 inches or a paper thickness! Without seeing it though, I can't tell you what I'd do. If glasses and cups are stopping, I call them out and demand it be fixed.
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You are basing your slab-thickness arguments on the assumption that the cabinet tops are perfectly level. I can guarantee that they are not. Lay some flat granite slabs on them and any slight bump will push up the granite when it is installed on the cabinet tops. This will create different levels where the slabs join. The high spots should have been sanded down or the slabs shimmed level when they did a dry test -- or did they even do a test before they glued the slabs down with silicone.

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Take a straight edge like a four foot level and lay it on the counter to see how much difference there is. They should be able to get it almost perfect. While you're at it verify that it is level in every direction.
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I use this one
Better is the enemy of good enough
cheers Bob
On the granite mismatch.......is it really .004?
Will a sheet of paper placed on the lower slab prevent the "clunk"
I don't think I'd like the clunk, esp if there was a tipping potential.
It is possible to remove the step & make the counter top flat & polish back to near original finish but it will be a lot of work.
Level is going to be what it turns out to be unless you reset the slabs
Granite surface plates used for inspection are polished flat on the order of .0001" per foot.
cheers Bob
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