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No. It won't. EOLR is an open/closed detection circuit only. Unless each switch/contact is a home run...bypassing a single switch will not set it off. Just determine what the switch state is supposed to be in normal mode, and either jump it, or don't. close/leave it open. EOLR won't notice anything as you didn't really change anything from it's POV. the circuit is still open or closed. It's happy.
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On 7/27/2012 12:09 AM, Dustin wrote:

Heck, I sourced some door switches for an embassy that were resistant to the extra magnet trick and you needed a cutting torch to get to the wires. ^_^
TDD
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Damn you.
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On 7/28/2012 12:31 AM, Dustin wrote:

It was for an engineer friend working for the same construction company I worked for out in The Pacific at the missile range when the company got contracts to build U.S. Embassies in various countries around the globe. For some odd reason, the government is kinda picky about security at embassies. You could look up balanced magnetic door switches of a few types, some more secure than others and harder if not impossible to defeat. O_o
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

In the opening episode of this season's "Breaking Bad," the cops raided the headquarters of the bad guy. The cops confiscated a laptop computer and checked it into the police property room. Obviously, when the cops got around to looking through the computer's files, Walt and his buddy would be screwed. Oh, what to do?
The got an OLD delivery truck with an aluminum shell. In this truck, they mounted the business end of a magnetic junk crane, you know the type, about five feet in diameter and capable of picking up trashed automobiles. Also in the van they mounted 42 heavy-duty batteries.
During the night, they drove the truck up against the back wall of the police property room and threw the switch.
It was a hoot to see all the shelving and metal property leave its location and hug the wall!
The cops were, um, call it confused to see everything in the property room in disarray. Then they found the truck, tipped over against the back wall.
Where there's a will, there's a way.
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HeyBub wrote:

It takes an alternating magnetic field to demagnatise a disk and the permananat magnets inside the drive have a higher density that that would have provided. Of course, you can't expect a script writer to know that. Like an episode of McGyver years ago: He was inside a nuclear reactor and the control for the 'alarm system' was built on Radio Shack perf board.
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07:59:39 -0400 typed in alt.survival the following:

    Aren't the electromagnets on those booms A/C powered?
    OTOH, in "Cryptonepricon" (Or however it is spelled - Neil Stephenson's book) the "good guys" built large magnetic coils into the door and window frames of the server room. Any computer drive taken out of the server room without first killing the main power - got wiped. When they said they offered secure data storage, they meant it.

    Good thing, I've talked with many friends over the years about how They got Missile (etc) Security all wrong - and the consensus was usually "Do you really want them to get it right?"
tschus pyotr
    
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wrote:

Perhaps, but "42 heavy duty batteries" aren't. ;-)

I doubt they could get the magnetic flux density necessary to write a modern disk drive.

OTOH, I understand that Tom Clancy has been interviewed a couple of times because of some of the details in his submarine scenes.
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15:17:33 -0400 typed in alt.survival the following:

    Good point.

    Oh they did get the necessary flux density. It was, after all, a Major Plot Point.
    In the real world - just a matter of engineering.

    A) the SF story publish in 1942 about the making of an "atomic bomb" which got the author a visit from the FBI. (And there was a short story some years later, about how a guy got tired of the bad props for a science fiction series, so made some "realistic" ones. They were accepted, and soon, the series was a mega hit because it all seemed "real". Then one evening, he answers the door, and mistakes the person at the door for the FBI, before spotting the "Flying Saucer" in the driveway.)
    B) "The Secret that exploded" - after a while, if you speak the jive of the tribe, they assume you too have the necessary clearance.
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wrote:

Unless science trumps engineering. Getting that sort of flux density over a large area tends to cause "problems".

"You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. That's the signpost up ahead your next stop, the Twilight Zone!"

AIUI, he was allowed a tour of a boomer but all of the classified stuff was covered. His imagination just filled in the "obvious". IIRC, the issue was the SONAR station.
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pyotr filipivich wrote:

AC has less holding power than DC. it could also set up resonant vibration in what they are pulling against. They may use unfiltered DC from a bank of rectifiers, but at that power level it would require three phase, and the ripple is only a few percent with a full wave three phase bridge. Those electromagnets are extremely power hungry. I weas shocked tro see the specs on one. 480 V 1000A three phase to the 'rectifier' and about a 10% duty cycle for the electromagnet, depending on the surrounding temperature and airflow. They also have a high residual magnetic field, so it helps in the lifting.

Three things come to mind:
1: Hard drives were physically larger in 1999. New recording techniques allow a density they couldn't achieve, ant that requires a lot higher magnetic field to erase the data.
2: What would have stopped someone from stealing the data on CDROMs?
3: The data could be remotely logged, so even if that did work, it's still not secure unless the servers were completely isolated from any other computer. That kind of makes servers unneeded, doesn't it? Do you know what it would take to maintain a field like that? How about the 'Inverse Square law'?
You would need a low frequency alternating magnetic field to erase a drive, and the opening would have to me quite small. The magnetic field would likely be so strong that it would be detrimental to the person carrying the drive. Are you familiar with 'Skin Depth' in wire? That means that the higher the frequency, the less of the conductor is penetrated by the electrical current. DC can use the entire conductor, but at a high enough AC frequency the current only uses the outside and whatever the 'Skin Depth' is. That is the reason that high power RF coils are wound with copper tubing, and sometimes silver plated to reduce the surface resistance. 'Skin Depth' is also involved in waveguide. The metal only has to be thick enough for the required physical strength to support it's weight. The RF bounces along inside the waveguide at much lower loss than in coax. There is a whole class of mathematics involved in the design of high power waveguide systems. Another is the design of high power diplexers used in NTSC TV broadcast. They look like steam punk, because they have to. Lots of gleaming copper or brass, sometimes tons of it.
A better approach would be a metal detector that won't let you remove any metal from the room without dropping it through a high power shredder, and the debris is removed by gravity trough a long shaft.

How would they know when they got it right?
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On 7/28/2012 6:59 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

Do you laugh your ass off watching low budget SciFi shows where the engine room of the giant alien space cruiser is actually a chiller plant for an big building's air conditioning system? Placards with alien looking symbols cover the nameplates with Carrier, York, Trane and Square D printed on them. It hurts to laugh that hard sometimes. ^_^
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I LOVE that crap. Sometimes I need a good laugh and it never fails to deliver. OTOH, I got bored and wrote a Sci-Fi trilogy about 25 years ago that had a lot of hidden puns. The 286 computer was brand new and bragging about 12 MHz processors on a 16 bit data bus. The computer in the story had a 4 GHz processor with a 1024 bit data bus, and used FTL technology to eliminate the bottleneck between the the processor and memory. No hard drives, it used 'Crystal Memory' A terabyte per cubic inch, and one engineer is complaining he only has 10 memory modules. They are each 20'*20'*100', and he's complaining. ;-)
Then there's the working transporter they developed, along with lots of other off the wall technology. ;-)
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

No, just too many plugins, and the ability to convert & run software written for any processor or OS in the new systems native code. MS could never write code like that.

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message

I choked up with laughter at the submarine's control room in The Fifth Missile which was a row of old Tektronix 5## tube scopes on carts.
jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

How about 'Plan 9 from Outer Space'? Things sitting around in the 'space ship' that would go flying onto the deck if it ever moved. Or 'Voyage to the bottom of the sea' that couldn't do anything without a steam line rupturing. I bet the crew of the Nautilus laughed their asses off at the 'Seaview'.
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

I picked up a collection of 50 old Sci-Fi movies for $10 at Walmart a few days ago. "Over 70 hours of Out-of-this world action! (UPC 826831071213) http://www.millcreekent.com/sci-fi-invasion-50-movie-pack.html
It includes the movie "Mission Stardust", based on the perry Rhodan series of novels. Now I'm ready for the next time that I'm confined to bed for a few days. :)
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On 7/28/2012 6:20 AM, HeyBub wrote:

It's bad enough that the critters are stealing the darn things for the metal. Now the idiot dope dealers will get into the act thinking they can erase any data law enforcement has on them. O_o
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Hall effect sensors near the mag switch would be real fun to defeat.
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On 7/28/2012 6:55 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:

I had a narrow range thermal intermittent failure of the Hall effect sensor in the distributor of my old van some years ago. I coined the term "The Goldilocks Effect". The temperature has to be just right for a semiconductor to work. I've come across this on a number of occasions over four decades in all sorts of solid state equipment that used discrete semiconductors. I even had a transistor act like an inductor in the IF stage of a two way radio at room temperature one time and chilling it down caused it to behave. If those immortality pill I bought off The Interweb work, I guess I'll live long enough to see everything. The pills are supposed to give my a giant schlong too, it claimed to do so in the Email. ^_^
TDD
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