Lessons from Sandy

Page 8 of 13  


In some cases, Mother Nature just "pulled the chain" - now if only the city had the will and the cash to do "urban renewal" properly in those areas.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

Oh, stuff will get rebuilt. Highrise office and residential towers will get cleaned up. I'm sure the beachfront real estate will get rebuilt as well. Not my cup of tea for my home, but there are plenty of people who want to. And some of those communities are very, very closeknit. Whether it makes investment sense is a different question ...
--
Best regards
Han
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A LOW COST source of excellent inverters is discarded UPS units.
When UPS batteries die often people discard the entire thing. Smart people collect the discarded units, perhaps add a car battery or two, of jumper cables to attach to your car battery.
often these UPS units espically the costly ones provide nice clean power
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On 11/5/2012 8:44 PM, bob haller wrote:

I took a load of bad UPS batteries to a recycler last week and got 28 cents a pound for them. I had over 200lbs of the old sealed lead acid batteries. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Just make sure that they are capable of recharging a low car battery. Some will poop out if forced to charge that hard.
Some UPS units run the output off the wall circuit until the power goes out..then switches over to the inverter "quickly"
Others run the inverter 24/7. Those are the ones you want.
Sometimes.."quickly" isnt quick enough.
Gunner
-- "
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wrote:

+1 Use the right battery in one of these UPS. If you get them on the net they are not that expensive. I had a source of "bad" ones and now I have 6 nice ones with fresh batteries. My wife and I were both typing on our PC,s watching TV. We had the power drop out and the only way we knew was the light in the kitchen went off.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

That would work for the power outages that used to be common here (sort of), when you lose power for minutes to an hour or 2. We were among the first ones in Fair Lawn, NJ to get our power back (2/3 of town lost power). But that was after 99 hours. Today is day 8 and some in town still have no power. I don't think a UPS can last that long.
When my power went out, the first thing I did was go and shut down the UPS (the desktop feeding off it had been shut down in anticipation, but it was still feeding the router for my FiOS). Then I looked out, saw a neighbor on another circuit lose their power about 10 minutes later, and then kept watching, mesmerized, how one by one circuits failed as the wires came down in very bright flashes through the trees, all along the horizon. Some lights stayed on, from the few homes that didn't lose power.
Yes this was unprecedented. Much more severe than Irene, which 14 months ago was thought to have been unprecedented in its effects on electric systems, and then came the freak snow storm. Now Sandy. What next ... Tomorrow and Thursday we are expecting a bad nor'easter. I drove to Kingston NY to get a small generator. Don't like the honking noise machines they sell at HD or Lowes. Now I have to get oil, gas can and gas, after I vote for Obama. Forward, guys! (sorry, had to get that in).
--
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Han
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 06:55:22 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Hurricanes in the NorthEast are far from rare, no matter what the global warming people say
This is just the first one recently that made that hook into Ny/NJ but the dip in the jet stream that caused that is pretty normal/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_England_hurricanes
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On 11/5/2012 11:05 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

People have such a short memory. They're like an ant hill that gets kicked from time to time. O_o
TDD
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On Mon, 5 Nov 2012 00:30:49 -0800 (PST), harry

Floodproof? in Manhattan, Long Island, and Queens???? You are dreaming, Harry. Out in the "sticks" they could (and some do) put them up on stilts, but even Noah's Ark may have had a close call with Sandy. It did take down the Bounty.
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 14:24:23 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If they actually follow the FEMA rules, all of the Jersey shore houses will be built on pilings when they put them back. If Jersey is like NOLA they will allow them to ignore the law, they will build back at grade and we will buy them new houses ,... again... when the next storm comes.
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 16:33:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Even houses on pilings didn't withstand the storm in many cases. How tall do you make the pilings? And how well do you crossbrace them?
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 16:55:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Houses at the beach here are about 14 feet above the sand and the pilings are 20 feet or so in the ground. For that storm up there being 8-9 feet up would have been plenty (pretty standard for a piling house so you can park your car under the house). This is not supposed to be habitable space and FEMA flood insurance will not pay if everything under the house washes away, yet people still do make bonus rooms down there, knowing they are expendable. You can see this in action in that Gilchrist house I linked a few times. Water went over that island about 15 feet high. The finished floor level still got wet but it wasn't blown away. The grade level was wiped clean as it was designed..
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Steel and salt water are not a good mix.
Pilings are generally 8x8 2.50 CCA wood or reinforced concrete. The house is usually pretty well fastened to the pilings. In my friend's house, they actually extend pilings to the top of the walls on the perimeter and the walls are built around the pilings
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Steel and salt water don't go all that well together.

Don't believe it.
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On Nov 6, 12:49am, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzz wrote:

Ships are made out of steel. Any immersion is only brief.
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wrote:

Come on harry, you're not that dense, are you? These houses are built on/in dunes. It always blows salt around there. Good thick steel will last a while, but sitting in the soil in salt water year round can't be good for them.
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There are steel framed buildings in New York are there not? There are steel piers in the UK more than a hundred years old. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Piers_Society Here is an iron and steel building right by the sea in the UK more than 100 years old. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackpool_tower With only paint protection. Here's another. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forth_bridge There are lots of things can be done to prolong life even more nowadays.
Aside from that, American houses are shit. Steel would easily outlast them.
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On Tue, 6 Nov 2012 10:27:48 -0800 (PST), harry

They get painted every year. Most homeowners are not going to do that. We have plenty of steel bridges but they are government boondoggles that employ hundreds of maintenance people ... and they still fall down now and then. In the sub tropics the rust problem is a whole lot worse. Heat speeds up the reaction

It depends on where you are talking about. If you are building under the current coastal code, you end up with a very sturdy house.
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On Nov 6, 7:20pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Steel structures here don't get painted every year. The underwater parts never on piers etc. There are paint systems now that are good for thirty years in arduous conditions, more in non arduous conditions.
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