Lessons from Sandy

Page 7 of 13  
On 11/6/2012 5:08 AM, Han wrote:

In this are there are a lot of trailer homes and regulations for proper tie downs and such have come about due to losses during tornadoes and high winds which will toss them around like toys if they're unsecured. It ALWAYS takes a disaster for prudent measures to be put in place by law but the rule makers always seem to go overboard with regulations to show they're doing something and satisfy their lust for power over you. Rahm Emanuel, a famous P.L.L.C.F. once said something to that effect, "Never let a good crisis go to waste." I see the politicians in the area affected by the storm doing the typical behavior whenever the peasants run to the king and demand protection. Perhaps I'm just cynical but I've seen it all before. There will be a lot of wasted tax dollars, graft and corruption in the years/decades after The Sandy Disaster. O_o
TDD
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On Nov 6, 2:01 pm, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

Well if the laws are put in place before the disaster occurs, people whinge about their rights. Especially in America.
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That is when you have to decide whether you want the tree or what it will fall on
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

I don't know whether apparently healthy trees are in reality sick, or weakened from the droughts and really wet periods that have alternated here in the last few years. So this oak, laying on the ground didn't look sick to me, but the root system looked rather small. Some people have said that when a tree is healthy and in full leaf, you shouldn't really be able to see sky from below it. The tree between my home and the street (with branches overhanging the wiring) looks like it has half the leaves it should have to me, but the expensive tree guy said it was probably OK, since it has been there with 1/3 to 1/2 its root system under concrete and asphalt since 1929. Oops that looks really old for a pin oak ...
--
Best regards
Han
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FPL would never let a tree grow over a power line. They can't even be close
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

Around here people really love the trees. Until they don't anymore. Then, there are regulations that would prevent one from removing a tree, such as the need to get a town permit to do so. In addition, it costs a shitload of money to get a tree cut down and hauled away.
--
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Han
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I suppose the question is how much does it cost to remove that same tree from your living room. How many people will be impacted by that tree taking out the primary that supplies 4 or 5 blocks? Once you experience those things a few times you get a better perspective about trees.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in wrote:

Just to clarify - the tree would in all likelihood only take out the wires from the pole to my house.
--
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Han
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... and the transformer that supplies it if you get a short. That is usually 2-4 houses depending on the size of the transformer. For those people, it is actually worse than taking out a whole street because you are lower on the "fix" list.
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transformer - an possibly cause a "domino effect" failure.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:

I will have to pay Bartlett Tree Service to tell me how healthy the tree is on a regular basis. This past summer they told me it was fine.
These pin oak (or similar) trees around here date from around 1929, when this neighborhood was developed. We are now a national historic landmark (http://radburn.org , wikipedia). Most trees here are around 80 years old, and getting old age diseases. Some may at times not have been pruned properly. I was told (I am not an arborist) that it is a no no to cut off the suckers that grow straight up from the big horizontal branches of these oaks. Must have been done to the branch that came down on a calm day, taking out a light pole, since it showed a nice area of rot going down through this big horizontal branch that broke off. We are into a program of tree replacement ...
The question is indeed, where is the balance between keeping shade trees and protecting power lines???
--
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Han
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sure, you end up with the Long Island perspective: Nature is in the way. Dynamite it, bulldoze it, and pave it over. It's just too bad we haven't found a way to drain those pesky oceans.
I suppose you could live in a house made of 1/2" steel plate and no windows if you're unwilling to live with both the risks and rewards of the natural world.
I'd not choose to live without trees outside the window, and I'd not go sniveling if that choice bit me in the ass someday. YMMV.
"You may not know this, but there's things that gnaw at a man worse than dying." (Open Range)
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wrote:

While Congress still has to relearn it, life is a succession of compromises. For the moment I am unwilling to remove that tree precisely because I like the shade. But if I get any inkling that it is weakened or sick, it'll go fast.
--
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Han
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I have a tree like that too, my "shade tree" over the driveway. I always wanted one for working on my car. If it fell it would only hit the garage but I still keep the big limbs trimmed back
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On Thu, 08 Nov 2012 19:59:29 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:

Yeah, I wish that were the case here ... I have no idea what it would cost. Some of the soil here is very thin, with rock (and underground water!) very near the surface. Many homes need sump pumps (mine doesn't). With the 80 year-old sewers, gas- and water-lines in place, getting electric underground would probably be a rather big job.
--
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Han
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I think you can attach one leg to the gas line and one leg to the water line, and bring the power in that way.
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Too much gas in the sewer line ... Wouldn't work, especially when the soil is moist and conducive.
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Han
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house at Wasauga Beach a few years ago for the grand sum of $6 worth of gas for the chainsaw. 4 brothers and father put in about 5 hours of hard work - and between a few brothers and neighbours the vast majority of the wood dissapeared virtually overnight - at no cost at all.
Add about $100 to repair roof where a small branch hit and punched a hole - but it needed a roof anyway.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in wrote:

I'm not that limber anymore. Did those things 30 years ago, including a big old cherry tree, the kind you hang a swing from. Remember standing on the corner of the roof to cut down a fairly young pine. I could easily reach the trunk standing there on the roof.
Now I don't do this anymore, and my offspring is great, but not like that ...
--
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Han
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