Lessons from Sandy

Page 5 of 13  
On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 23:35:56 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Just the boiler insulation or in this case, firebox and plenum insulation.
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On 11/5/2012 1:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Johnstone Supply sells "Kaowoll" to replace the old insulation. ^_^
http://www.johnstonesupply.com/storefront/hvacr-parts/controls/oil-heat-controls/kaowool/c1027991-c1026844-c1027784-c1028327-p1.html
http://tinyurl.com/br8hb2y
TDD
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On Mon, 05 Nov 2012 13:26:22 -0600, The Daring Dufas

You mean KAOWOOL - it isRockwool. You need to get rid of the Asbestos first - and while you are into the project that far you may just as well get rid of the old "dragon" and put in a real furnace.
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On 11/5/2012 3:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Lots O folks is PO rite now an aint gots no money FO no new stuff. O_o
TDD
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 15:53:09 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Gravity furnaces. Still a few in use around here - along with "floor furnaces" with only one heat outlet - like a space heater in a hole in the floor. Don't step on the grate bare-footed!!!!!!
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On 11/4/2012 9:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

We had them in our home in the 1950's and my younger siblings often wound up with waffle brands on various parts of their bodies. Ya know, the things we survived around as children are not allowed anywhere near kids today. O_o
TDD
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Check with your local gas supplier about available rebates for installing a high-efficiency gas furnace. I replaced the rickety, 20-year-old gas furnace in my daughter's house with a new 97% efficient unit and received a $800 rebate from the gas company. ---- Diogenes
The wars are long, the peace is frail The madmen come again . . . .
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Why would the gas company pay you to put in a furnace that uses less of their product? That would be like McDonalds paying people to take diet pills.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Check with your local gas supplier about available rebates for installing a high-efficiency gas furnace. I replaced the rickety, 20-year-old gas furnace in my daughter's house with a new 97% efficient unit and received a $800 rebate from the gas company.
--
Diogenes

The wars are long, the peace is frail
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More likely the gas company gets a kickback from the installer and the state pays you a good boy premium for conserving.
I hired a company to oversee the installation of extra insulation in the attic (foamed between the rafters, and sealed everything in sight, including the plate on the foundation). I got a check from the state for 50% of the costs. Paperwork was all done by the contractor. Made things much more pleasant this past summer.
--
Best regards
Han
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On 11/4/2012 3:49 PM, Han wrote:

Power company would not install new gas lines at time my house was built. I think some older neighbors have it and line would be maybe 300 yards from my house. No sewer or water lines on my street either. Electric, fios and cable are underground. Watching fios and Comcast cut each others lines accidentally in installations, I would not want to be around if gas or sewer were installed.
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There were a few who didn't buy my house because gas was not hooked up. So it cost me $1k to hook it up after I lived with the old oil for a year. The furnace was 40 years old.
Greg
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During ice storm 2003, I got to experience how wonderful a gas water heater is. A hot shower in the morning brinigs back life. After a freezing cold night under a pile of blankets.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
You lucked out on your heating system. If you have a gas water heater you can live like civilized people without electricity. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 13:54:29 -0600, The Daring Dufas

Many hot water heaters require electricity for ignition now that conservation and safety has mandated no more pilot lights.
Ditto furnaces and they also require a hot air blower of a hot water circulation pump.
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On 11/04/2012 06:36 PM, Winston_Smith wrote:

Here, electricity was off a couple of days during an ice storm in the winter of 1999. I was glad to have heat then (central heat wouldn't work, but water heater and gas logs did).

BTW, people say furnaces should be hardwired instead of using a plug. Is that because of the ground? Something else?
--
51 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:00:00 AM).

Mark Lloyd
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Someone wrote it into the National Electrical Code.
No electrical reason, that I can tell.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote in message
BTW, people say furnaces should be hardwired instead of using a plug. Is that because of the ground? Something else?
--
51 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:00:00 AM).

Mark Lloyd
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On Sun, 4 Nov 2012 21:11:56 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

The NEC does not say anywhere that a furnace blower needs to be hard wired. It is the manufacturer that says that. The only NEC reference is 110.3(B) that says things need to be installed per manufacturer's instructions. If I had a furnace, it would have a cord and plug connection to the blower, thermostat transformer and igniter
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

I am planning on doing that. Thanks for your opinion. I will use it as reference (grin). {We plan on being carried out of the house, feet first, toes up. No sale of the house will happen before then}
--
Best regards
Han
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If I was doing this, I would replace the single gang handy box the disconnect switch is in with a 4x4. Put a cord grip connector in one of the knockouts with a short 14ga line cord. Put a single receptacle and the disconnect switch in that box with the line side feeding the switch, then the receptacle and the cord connected to the load side.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in news:risf98hn095cjvig7r1k0k30k09jo2eqj3@ 4ax.com:

I'm not an electrician, so I will really need to parse that properly. In addition, I have to examine the wiring I have carefully, since there is an "on-off" switch on the furnace that is between the furnace and a junction box that feeds both the switch and furnace as well as the thermostat and the damper relay. This junction box (A) is where we replaced the romex feeding into it with a wire and plug. When that was connected to the car inverter, the whole shebang worked properly, thermostat and all. There is another switch at the stairs that looks like the switch for killing an older furnace. I'll have to test whether that switch does anything. Stairs and breakerbox are far from each other at diagonally apposed corners of the basement.
I was thinking that I would wire a cord and plug into the above junction box (A). Then place a single gang handy box near the junction box from which box A is fed. Wire that new box up with outlets that (separately) get fed by the old romex and by new romex that gets fed from the generator I just bought (Honda EU2000i) - expensive but quiet, and it should be sufficient for fridge/freezer plus furnace and a few lights or laptops. The genrator would then be grounded through the housewiring grounds to the grounding rod put in when we upgraded the electrical panel.
--
Best regards
Han
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It sounds like you are in the right box. You can just swap that one with a bigger one, add a receptacle on the load side of the disconnect switch and it sounds like you have the cord in the right place. Get one of those cord grip connectors to clean that up (like a romex connector with a rubber ring and a collar). They have them at the home store.
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