Lessons from Sandy

Page 4 of 13  
wrote:

last about half as long.
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 22:35:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Indeed. Fortunately here in the high desert..we use swamp coolers, evaporative coolers..so a small one with a 1/4hp or 1/2hp motor will cool one or two rooms nicely when run on a genny.
My normal genset will run my big swamp cooler with its 1hp motor nicely..but when the fridge kicks in while an electric skillet etc is running..it tends to dim the lights for a few moments. Im running pretty close to its max at that point. Fortunately..we never lose gas..so I always tell the family to use gas when cooking rather than electric Stuff.
Gunner
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On Nov 3, 7:41 am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

if the load varies, you will need some kind of a governor to adjust the throttle to keep the speed and hence voltage and frequency constant.
Mark
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On 11/4/2012 8:52 PM, Mark wrote:

True, that's why I asked about his friend's homemade genset and what it used for a speed governor to regulate the frequency of the output voltage. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 21:05:34 -0600, The Daring Dufas

I called him and he said he hogged up a tach with a servo arm to pull or release the throttle. He breadboarded it a couple times till it served him properly and he then etched a board and built the final unit(s) several actually. He built gensets for his inlaws and brothers and sisters. Handy guy to know. <G>
Gunner
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On 11/4/2012 10:51 PM, Gunner wrote:

I was thinking that a lot of vehicles with TBI and FI use a little servo on the throttle body and those should available from any junkyard or parts house. The things were designed for automotive use and adapting them to your own controller shouldn't be a problem. Heck, I was looking at commercially available electronic governor units and they're designed to interface with a number of different manufacturers gensets. The electronics don't require microprocessors to regulate the speed and frequency of the genset, simple analog electronics will do just fine and are easier to repair in primitive conditions. When I was working out in the middle of The Pacific back in the 80's, the 20kw GM Delco diesel genset on our crew boat failed and it turned out to be the voltage regulator. I took it to the island's TV repair shop and replaced a bad FET on the circuit board with one for a TV set and got the genset back in operation. If it had been a microprocessor control unit, I would have been SOL. O_o
TDD
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wrote:

I have a 150 Watt inverter and finally got a friend to help hooking it up to the furnace (we went 99 hours without power in NE NJ, 07410). Furnace is natural gas-fired, circulating hot water. The inverter hookup worked fine, but I had to have the engine running, of course. It is OK for short emergencies, but I'd like better. Will be looking ...
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Best regards
Han
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On 11/4/2012 11:12 AM, Han wrote:

150 watts looks a bit small to me for running a furnace. Are you sure it wasn't a 1,500 watt unit? O_o
TDD
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wrote:

I am sure. The furnace only needs electricity to run a small circulating pump, plus power up a solenoid for the damper. Plus, it did work <grin>. But I don't like to sacrifice my only vehicle for this if I can avoid it.
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Han
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On 11/4/2012 12:44 PM, Han wrote:

That's right, you did write that it is circulating hot water. I assume it doesn't have a draft inducer blower like many boilers/furnaces. Is it one of those small Taco pumps? They don't use very much power. ^_^
TDD
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Yes, a Taco, 1/25 hp, using it says 0.76 Amps.
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Han
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On 11/4/2012 1:37 PM, Han wrote:

You lucked out on your heating system. If you have a gas water heater you can live like civilized people without electricity. ^_^
TDD
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Yep, we lucked out on that point and many others. The house is well- insulated, so even with only 2 people rattling around inside, it only got as cool as 58° for a little bit. That is endurable. We had cellphones working (recharge from car), LED flashlights, a propane Coleman lantern for bright light (only one), functioning stove and water heater. I even have a propane catalytic heater (Mr. Heater portable Buddy), but I was a little hesitant using it in an enclosed space.
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Best regards
Han
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On 11/4/2012 3:06 PM, Han wrote:

You're lucky. We could not get gas when our house was built. Oil furnace with blower takes a lot of juice. So does well. I've got 5,500 watt generator but hot water, stove and AC are all off line when power fails. Well, furnace, freezer and refrigerator were main reasons I got a generator and no way could these be handled off an inverter.
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Given a choice, I don't understand why anyone would buy a home that didn't have natural gas. I do understand that sometimes there is no choice. We had an oil furnace in our previous home, but it was expensive to run, stinky and not very reliable. There was gas for the stove. OK, the furnace was an old system. I would definitely ditch it for a gas furnace if I'd had to replace it. With gusto if I had known in advance that gas would drop in price by as much as it has. Luckily, where I have lived there has always been municipal water, gas of some sort, and electricity. Except for a few years, there has always been a sewer system as well.
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Han
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On 11/4/2012 2:49 PM, Han wrote:

There are a lot of older homes in my area that I describe as having an "octopus" furnace in the basement. The furnaces were originally coal fired and you can still see the coal bins and coal chute in many of the old homes. The supply ducts slope diagonally up to the main floor like limbs of a tree or octopus tentacles and the air flow is via convection with no blower and the ducts are fairly large in diameter. All of them I've ever seen were converted to natural gas in the middle of the last century but as inefficient as the beasts may be, they will keep a home warm in the winter during a power outage. ^_^
TDD
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I helped take out one of those. it had several hunded pounds of sand,on top. The top of the furnace tapred in, sort of like the shape of a paper snow cone container. That made for a LOT of work to get all that sand out. Then, the sand up the stairs, and dump in the yard.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
There are a lot of older homes in my area that I describe as having an "octopus" furnace in the basement. The furnaces were originally coal fired and you can still see the coal bins and coal chute in many of the old homes. The supply ducts slope diagonally up to the main floor like limbs of a tree or octopus tentacles and the air flow is via convection with no blower and the ducts are fairly large in diameter. All of them I've ever seen were converted to natural gas in the middle of the last century but as inefficient as the beasts may be, they will keep a home warm in the winter during a power outage. ^_^
TDD
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My house originally had coal furnace of some kind. I can't figure how it was hooked up. I do know, the second owner must have converted to oil early in time. My rafters above where the furnace would have been are very black. I'm well familiar with coal, both grandparents mined it. I remember the coal stove in the kitchen, coal fireplaces, coal furnace.
Greg
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On Sun, 4 Nov 2012 18:19:34 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

in it's worst form (wool)
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On 11/4/2012 9:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

You mean the furnace panel insulation or the house too. Most of those old houses had/have no insulation in the walls. ^_^
TDD
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