Legal use for 3way switch?

I have a circuit that has too much on it, and I need split it up. Running a new circuit to the box would be difficult, for reasons I won't go into here.
I also have a baseboard heater that I will probably never use, that runs right where I need a new circuit. I could simply cut off the heater, but that seems wasteful.
Could I put a 3way switch in; one position it goes to the baseboard heater, the other position it goes to the newly split circuit? Well, I know I can do it; but would it be a code violation?
The only thing on the split circuit would be my toaster oven, and that and the heater would be a definite overload. Either alone is just 12a.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think so... but picture the reaction of the next owner of your home. It certainly does *not* pass the "WTF did he do *that* for?" test.

Seems simple enough to me: don't try to use both of them at once.

Don't mention it.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Save the baby humans - stop partial-birth abortion NOW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This group gets questions like this from the people who cause the problems, and also questions from the poor bastards who move into the house after stuff like this has been done and try to figure out what is going on. It would be good to get both groups in one room and see who emerges alive.
As far as the code is concerned, a switch can control an outlet or outlets, and a three-way switch could control two sets of outlets. But if the heater is hardwired (not on an outlet), then it has to have its own dedicated circuit, and switching this or that with the heater is not what we call dedicated (in marital terms it is called adultery).

a
here.
heater,
do
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

problems,
outlets,
heater
I am looking to avoid problems, so I am asking. Thanks.
BTW, it is #12 on a 20a breaker, but 20a switches exist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't know what the code is, but first consider the load. Are the switch and all wiring and devices that will be used, rated to handle the current supplied by the breaker? Will the switch be rated to handle a heater of the size you have?
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 20:47:45 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

THe power to your baseboard heater is most likely 220V.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 20:47:45 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

Why? That's what I would do. Just simply cut it so that you...or the next owner...and NEXT owner...can later put it back the way it was.

Unique idea! You could even put a 3-way beyond the 3-way...to control another circuit...then maybe a 3-way beyond THAT. I used to have a train setup like that...it was called a switching yard! lol
Seriously, Wade...I've never seen that kinda setup before...mainly because it sure doesn't sound like code to me.
Where were you gonna put the 3-way switch? How would the subsequent owners find it?
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.