Led vs LCD TVs and 720 pixels vs 1080.

Page 1 of 7  
Oh, ye who are much smarter than *&&^%$) Verizon (if one can ever reach a "human'):
1. I may have to break down and buy a new 32"TV -- which I hate to do, given the small number of channels I watch out of the gazillion available.
Am in throes of trying to understand the pros & cons of LCD vs LED. The little research I have done on-line, e.g. <http:// www.ledvslcdtv.com/> as well as others, has left me more confused than ever.
I don't want to spend "x" today if the technology is going to take a quantum leap tomorrow.
Your thoughts on Led vs Lcd welcome.
2. A supposedly knowledgeable friend told me that paying more for a 1080 pixels TV is justified only if images are transmitted in 1080. Can images be transmitted either way? Or is it a function of the receiver? (Showing my ignorance <g>)
Your thoughts on 1080 vs 720 greatly appreciated.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Buy something at the nexus of affordability, bigness, and "quality." I got a big 'ol Sony LCD a year ago for the bonus room, mostly for kids' gaming. Then it turned into the main TV watching place, once I hooked it up to cable...

No signal benefits from LCD, plasma, LED, or anything else unless it comes to you in HD. The difference between HD and non-HD channels on my cable (and over the air, before I plugged it into the cable as an antenna) is staggering. I get a couple of channels in HD, and they are big, bright and beautiful compared to grainy, smeary old-standard channels.
I now have a standing rule in the house - nobody buys a movie unless it's BluRay. Now even DVDs look grainy and smeary compared to the stunning detail on BluRays on the big Sony. Sounds like a commercial, I know.
Now, on to my philosophy on "should I wait forever for the next big thing?" - um, no. Jump in, enjoy it while you have it. Opportunity cost is expensive, too. Yes, one day soon we will all have 3D TVs to replace our Plasma/LED/LCD/whatever TVs. Until then... rest your weary eyes on a big, bright screen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Led-vs-LCD-TVs-and-720-pixels-vs-1080-604606-.htm Rightcliqbyvisa wrote: Its tough to decide what kind of television to get nowadays. Theres so many options out there and half the time the technical jargon can be difficult to comprehend.
However, Ive found that doing online research and asking friends who own high-end televisions can be an enormous help. It can be a little cumbersome, but its worth it in the end because youre able to make an educated purchase.
Visa Rightcliq can also help you out in your purchase, helping you organize your shopping choices. Feel free to check it out at www.rightcliq.visa.com
Happy shopping and good luck with your television purchase!
schmidtd wrote:

------------------------------------- Cristian Rightcliq Outreach Team (510) 868-2787 ext. 123 www.twitter.com/RightcliqByVisa www.facebook.com/VisaPowertotheShopper
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 17, 2:40pm, cristian_at_socialarc_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (Rightcliqbyvisa) wrote:

Uh, thanks, really, for the great advice. Now...how did I end up on "Homeowners Hub"? I was just posting to this NG.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/17/2010 8:09 PM, Higgs Boson wrote: (snip)

Chuckle. We have all been providing content to 'those' web sites for years, and we ought to start billing them for a share of their ad revenues. Google yourself- we won't tell. You'll find you are a regular contributor to all sorts of web sites you never even heard of.
And I bet THIS posting doesn't get mirrored....
--
aem sends...


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: 2. your friend is correct but even OTA channels in my area are 1080i so I would not spend the money on a new TV unless it was capable of displaying 1080i/1080p. also blu-ray discs will not look as good as they could on a 720p TV.
FWIW I bought a 25" monitor/TV combo a while back for $300 and it is true 1080p, I am now spoiled. For a TV only device I expect you could pay less.
nate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cable and satelite are both providing lots of 1080i signals these days. I know that direct tv has some pay per view movies at 1080p. Blue ray is 1080p. The various game machines also have higher resolutions but I only know that the playstsation 3 is 1080p. On a 32" it is harder to tell the difference between picture quality at 720 verses 1080. The pricing is down far enouhg now that I would consider somthing larger.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Led-vs-LCD-TVs-and-720-pixels-vs-1080-604606-.htm DA wrote: Higgs Boson wrote:

It's not LCD vs. LED. There is only one LED (OLED) TV on the market (Sony XEL-1) that I'm aware of and at a whopping 11" diagonal you are probably not considering it, unless it's for some special application (that I'm struggling to envision, at the $1000 sticker price)
It's LCD with fluorescent (uncontrolled) backlight vs. LCD with LED (controlled) backlight. I'd say it's a no-brainer - LED backlight lets them turn it off when black is expected which gives it deeper shades of black (better contrast). I'd definitely go for the LED-backlit LCD TV these days.

Verizon will be happy to lease you an HD cable box that does output HD at 1080 (although, come to think of it, I'm not sure if it's interlaced 1080i or full 1080p). Either way 720 looks rather disappointing compared side-by-side with 1080 so, if budget allows, 1080p TV is definitely the way to go. You'll need to have them ship you a new cable box, then you'll ship them the old one back.
You are right, Verizon does a great job of shielding their humans (whomever is left there) from, what'cha call them? Customers! I did have lots of fun getting to the bottom of the problem in HDMI communication between the Verizon's HD box and my Samsung TV. On the third attempt an actual human answered that Vz HD box is "known to not work with Samsung TVs over HDMI cables" so I'm back to composite cables and no surround sound at this TV...
------------------------------------- /\_/\ ((@v@)) NIGHT ():::() OWL VV-VV
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 17, 3:33pm, info_at_1-script_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (DA) wrote:

On a 50" screen from 10-12 ft away there is no noticeable difference between 720 and 1080.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are talking 720p and 1080i yes. 1080p - progressive scan, is obvious even on smaller sets. And you do mean a Blue Ray test or try a test again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
9. Side by side, how do 720p and 1080p TVs match up in head-to-head tests?
We spend a lot of time looking at a variety of source material on a variety of TVs in our video lab here at CNET's offices in New York. When I wrote my original article over three years ago, many 1080p TVs weren't as sharp as they claimed to be on paper. By that, I mean a lot of older 1080p sets couldn't necessarily display all 2 million-plus pixels in the real world--technically, speaking, they couldn't "resolve" every line of a 1080i or 1080p test pattern.
That's changed in the last few years. Virtually all 1080p sets are now capable of fully resolving 1080i and 1080p material, though not every 1080p TV is created equal. As our resident video guru, Senior Editor David Katzmaier explains in his HDTV resolutions feature, Blu-ray serves up another video format, 1080p/24, and not every TV properly displays 1080p/24. The 24 refers to the true frame rate of film-based content, and displaying it in its native format is supposed to give you a picture exactly as the director intended you to see it (for a full explanation, click here).
Whether you're dealing with 1080p/24 or standard 1080p/60, doesn't alter our overall views about 1080p TVs. We still believe that when you're dealing with TVs 50 inches and smaller, the added resolution has only a very minor impact on picture quality. In our tests, we put 720p (or 768p) sets next to 1080p sets, then feed them both the same source material, whether it's 1080i or 1080p, from the highest-quality Blu-ray player. We typically watch both sets for a while, with eyes darting back and forth between the two, looking for differences in the most-detailed sections, such as hair, textures of fabric, and grassy plains. Bottom line: It's almost always very difficult to see any difference--especially from farther than 8 feet away on a 50-inch TV.
I said so much in a 2006 column I wrote called "The case against 1080p," but some readers knocked us for not looking at high-end TVs in our tests. But the fact is, resolution is resolution, and whether you're looking at a Sony or a Westinghouse, 1080p resolution--which relates to picture sharpness--is the same and is a separate issue from black levels and color accuracy.
Katzmaier stands by his previous analysis: The extra sharpness afforded by the 1080p televisions he's seen is noticeable only when watching 1080i or 1080p sources on a larger screens, say 55 inches and bigger, or with projectors that display a wall-size picture. Katzmaier also says that the main real-world advantage of 1080p is not the extra sharpness you'll be seeing, but instead, the smaller, more densely packed pixels. In other words, you can sit closer to a 1080p television and not notice any pixel structure, such as stair-stepping along diagonal lines, or the screen-door effect (where you can actually see the space between the pixels). This advantage applies regardless of the quality of the source
http://reviews.cnet.com/720p-vs-1080p-hdtv /
Just one of MANY sources that say the same thing.
<snip>
I have a 50" Panasonic 720 Plasma. My neighbor has a 50" LG 1080 Plasma. We both sit about 11 ft away from our TVs. There is NO noticeable resolution difference, period. Sounds like you bought the Best Buy sales pitch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was at best buy a maybe a month ago, in the 47" tv section, all tvs, a whole wall were being fed 720p or 1080i except one tv. I immediatly noticed it was much sharper, the saleman confirmed only that one was on a Blue Ray player doing 1080p. it was Avatar. The difference was obvious, also obvious to the other maybe 3 customers that also came to stare. I wont buy a 1080i tv for my next one, at 32" maybe 720p-1080i is ok, but I also like my 24" computer monitor set to 1920x 1200 when I view photos, because im real close up. I bet anyone can go to best buy and the guys there will pull out a blue ray player and let you compare. Once I went there with a kill a watt meter and the sales man enjoyed testing his sets so they wont mind doing a Blue Ray test.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Did you even read the article that I posted????? They tested the TV's with a Blu-ray players with the same source material.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I read it, but I went to best buy and saw my own test, there was no comparison, 1080p is the way to go. Just wait until they put out 2160p!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is not what you said. You said a side-by-side comparison with 720p, 1080i and 1080p as the source material.
Whatever......you obviously have better eyes than me and all of the NUMEROUS people that have done side-by-side comparisons and said there is NO visual difference (minimal at best) between a 50" 720 or 1080 at 10-12 ft away when tested with a 1080p source (Blu-ray player). Keep wasting your money and drinking the Best Buy Kool-Aid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think one big factor here that hasn't been mentioned is he is apparently relying on BestBuy's statement of what the sources were. Given that the typical floor person there is clueless or worse, who knows what the real sources were for what he was looking at.
I bought a 50" Sony Bravia LCD at Circuit City a year ago. The salesman asked me if I needed cables. I had the answer already prepared: "I already have HDMI cables." Whereupon he takes me over to the Monster cable rack and shows me a $80 HDMI cable and tells me that since the Sony is 120hz, unless I have new cables, it won't work. Of course, there are two big problems with that. First is that the 120hz is the refresh rate of the display and has nothing to do with the HDMI interface or cables. Second is that even if it did involve the cable, the idiot must think that 120hz is some super high frequency that requires special cable. Or more likely, he's out to collect his commission and just lying.
As I was paying for my TV, an elderly man was buying a 27" TV and the salesman got him to take the Monster cables. I bet the cables cost a quarter or a third of what the TV cost. And the profit they made on the cable far exceeds what they made on the TV.
So, who knows what they would do in a store to push a specific model TV that has a spiff in it for the salesman.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 06:35:27 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You can't really judge TVs in a typical mass merchant store, unless your living room has similar lighting.
Manufacturers of all televisons have a preset for the picture called "vivid" or similar, that is universally known as "Torch Mode". It is a preset where everything is cranked way up, so the picture still looks like something when displayed under a few billion watts of florescent lighting. It is not a setting that should be used in the home unless you are awaiting cataract surgery. Televisions in stores are set to torch mode. You aren't seeing anything that can be fairly or accurately evaluated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 18, 9:51am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

At least we can agree on that....must be a sign of the Apocalypse.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

My motto when in stores: Don't trust nothing what eats
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An excellent summary. Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.