LED Light Bulbs now cheaper than Incandescent

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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 23 Aug 2015 10:02:12 -0400, "Robert Green"

I saw a PSA that said just that.
A public service announcement.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 23 Aug 2015 10:02:12 -0400, "Robert Green"

What's that.
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A search which couldn't have taken more than 5 seconds:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minamata_disease
nb
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On 08/23/2015 08:32 AM, notbob wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mad_hatter_disease
Stonewalling an obvious problem isn't unique to Japan.
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<stuff snipped>

China had to dismantle their hodge-podge of lead acid battery makers amd form them into an organized consortium because lead poisoning had gotten completely out of control in several districts. Looks like China's not quite got the hang of environmental protection.
Japan has a pretty unique history of ignoring the obvious (like they had already lost the war in mid 1945). Especially if "saving face" is involved. (They're still pissing off China re: WWII issues.)
They know that Tokyo Bay is ringed with chemical factories and huge storage tanks that will likely rupture in a big enough quake. They also know when those ruptured tanks spill into the Bay, it's going to create a toxic stew as great as any the world has ever seen since primordial earth. They even have a name for all those tanks ringing the bay ("The Poison Necklace").
I believe they're still arguing about who's going to pay to quake proof some of the nastiest chemical vessels (if that's even possible). Ironically, they're turning their nukes back on. What's one little accident, anyway?
--
Bobby G.



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On 08/23/2015 07:52 PM, Robert Green wrote:

There's hope. They learned not to mix melamine with the dog food and kill Fifi. The difference is in China when they figure out who had the bright idea they shoot him. In the US the company is fined 5% of one day's profits and the beat goes on.
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Well, they've learned more about how to cheat and not get caught. (-: Remember the recent laminated wood/formaldehyde incident? They offered two qualities of flooring. One that could never pass the test and one that could and for the right number of reminbi's they'd somehow manage to mark the failing flooring as A-OK. But they wanted to make sure they had accomplices. (-:

Odd that the socialist Chinese understand the concept of personal responsibility better than we do. Our entire economy crashed and very few people were held responsible. One idiot who led the pack of SOBs that brought on the Crash of 2008 even had the chutzpah to try suing the US for bailing out AIG.
I am pretty sure he would have gotten a bullet in the head had he tried that stunt in China. Then I suspect his family would be summarily stripped of all their wealth, whether or not it came from criminal acts. I don't think the Chinese are as mindful of bills of attainder as were our founding fathers.
Punishing a bad guy's family is very profitable, as the English Tudor kings discovered. Yesterday it was Castle Bowman, today it's castle Green. Tomorrow it's whomever didn't piss the king off's castle. A very powerful motive for not effing with the King. Was it "History of the World" where he says: "Aahhh! It's good to be the king."
--
Bobby G.




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On 8/24/2015 6:00 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Exactly! Furthermore, anybody dumb enough to buy from Liquid Lumberdators deserves whatever cheap shit they get. If folks want quality they should go to a quality retailer.
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On 08/24/2015 04:00 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Reforming the religion is also good. Thomas Cromwell and his cronies made a bundle out of the confiscated Church property and Henry got a new punch. It didn't turn out too well for Tommy. Too bad they didn't round up all the Cromwells and execute them, saving the world from Oliver.
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kings

powerful

where he

A lot of the King's ministers, his wifes, his mistresses and their friends and relatives all misplaced their heads involuntarily. IIRC, a few even got drawn and quartered although I think even the king could not visit that punishment on the nobility - only commoners. I do believe on rare occasions he did "denobilize" someone to visit some horrible punishment on them. A few even got hanged in chains and were then left to rot in place. That's got to smell something awful. Just like radios have magic smoke in them, humans have magic stink that escapes when they day (and for days afterward).

Do you think anyone named Cromwell has been elected to British office since then? I would imagine it would be like Atlanta where very few Shermans are to be found in the phonebook (or were, when I last looked 40 years ago).
--
Bobby G.



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On 08/27/2015 05:32 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Olly is one of my all time favorites. You really have to piss people off to have them dig you up, give you a posthumous execution, and put your head on a pike.
Churchill wanted to name a battleship HMS Oliver Cromwell but the king wasn't enthusiastic. The Irish were testy enough without another appearance of Cromwell. He still makes the lists of popular historical figures though.
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wrote:

Here is the one that's the most famous
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomoko_Uemura_in_Her_Bath
https://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2009/05/06/tomoko-uemura-in-her-bath/
because its composition is very much like Michaelangelo's "Pieta" (the cruxified Jesus held in the arms of his mother Mary).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Michelangelo%27s_Pieta_5450_cropncleaned_edit.jpg
Photographer Eugene Smith was beaten and partially blinded by company goons for taking the photos that finally exposed the Chisso Company's pollution. When Smith died the copyright of this very famous photo passed to his wife who returned the rights to the family according to their wishes. They wanted no further publication of the photo of their daughter, who died at age 21. The small copies that still exist (nothing ever vanishes from the Internet!) really don't capture the impact of Tomoko's blind eyes staring into space.
--
Bobby G.



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On 08/23/2015 08:02 AM, Robert Green wrote:

I've wondered about those twisty spirals. The company also produced the helical flashtubes for strobe like the animation towards the bottom of the page:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashtube
They were all hand blown. Glass blowing was considered one of the plum jobs and most of the girls, er, women, wanted to try out for it. Some got it, most didn't. It was one of those things where you just had to know when the glass was ready to bend and how much pressure to keep on the tube so it wouldn't collapse.
Knowing that, I can envisions factories packed with young Chinese women sitting in front of burners twisting spirals and the odd glass swan when the boss isn't looking.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 23 Aug 2015 12:29:11 -0600, rbowman

I had a CFL that looked pretty much like a small incandescent bulb. Then I broke the glass and found there was a twisty spiral inside.

Wow. If I leave that part of the page showing, is it still animated while I'm looking at another window? What if I scroll up a page so it's not showing. Is it still using computer cycles?

Not blowing but bending, we did a tiny bit of in high school chemistry. Just straight tubes bent to an angle. It was fun. Blowing would be a lot harder, especially starting from just a blob.

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On 08/23/2015 07:40 PM, micky wrote:

True, it was bending unless they screwed up and blew too hard. 'Glass blower' was just a sexier job description than 'glass bender'. I liked the one where you heat the middle and pull the tube apart to make pipettes.
The fun part was when we got into quartz glass. Soda-lime glass can be worked with an oxyacetylene flame but quartz needs hydrogen. For industrial use the supplier just drops a tube trailer:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compressed_hydrogen_tube_trailer
You pay demurrage on the trailer and when it's close to empty they just swap another one out. But you need a permit to have the trailer on the premises. For some reason when you go to a local government office and say 'hydrogen' they finish the sentence with 'bomb'. They should have been more worried about the liquid oxygen tanks but that's government for you.
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<stuff snipped>

I find that the ones with the spiral enclosed inside an outer shell are the worst when it comes to slow warm-ups.
--
Bobby G.



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cheaper

I'll bet the have healthy lungs from blowing all day. Glass, that is.
(-: Those twisty spirals are what will kill CFLs. When both bulbs hit commodity pricing (and they're close) it will still take more effort to build a CFL so they'll be just slightly more expensive. Besides, the design is poor in that screwing them in puts in inordinate amount of stress on the two places where the tube enters the electronics pods. And then there's the ever-lengthening time it takes for the older ones to come up to full brightness.
The irony is that after having paid $10 or more per CFL in the beginning, I am now reluctant to stock up on $2 LED bulbs because I think they'll go much lower. Under a buck in just a year or two.
--
Bobby G.



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On 8/23/2015 11:00 PM, Robert Green wrote:

Actually, glass blowing supposedly fries your lungs! Not just the super heated air but, also, the chemicals and particulate matter that inevitably get inhaled in the process.
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On 08/24/2015 01:02 AM, Don Y wrote:

You're supposed to be like Bill Clinton.
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On 08/24/2015 12:00 AM, Robert Green wrote:

Ah, the deflationary spiral :) I'll defer my purchase because the item will be cheaper next Tuesday.
I'll have to admit I've been impressed by the advances in LED technology. I have an old Black Diamond headlamp with two LEDs that put out enough light to navigate a well maintained trail. Next to it is the $20 Duracell 1000 CP flashlight that lets me see what that deer 100 yards away is up to.
What I'm waiting for is the LED driving light kits for bikes to come down a little more. When you live with the aforementioned Bambis wandering around at night the more light the better on a bike.
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