LED flashlight report for home repair

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On 10/1/2014 8:04 PM, J Burns wrote:

This may not be relevant to your threads, but the HF free ones they give out, the machining is awful. I take the end cap off, and put a blast of petroleum jelly on the threads. Helps a lot.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/1/14, 8:15 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

A reviewer said he lubed the threads on the HL50, too. Was that you? ;)
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On 10/1/2014 10:36 PM, J Burns wrote:

Naah, that guy was way better looking. But, must be a kindred spirit.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Wednesday, October 1, 2014 8:15:16 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

HF actually sells the fix for a reasonable price as I said in my last post - Super Lube is good stuff for flashlight O-rings/threads.
nate
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On 10/3/2014 9:22 AM, N8N wrote:

> stuff for flashlight O-rings/threads.

You consider seven bucks for three ounces "reasonable"? I got petroleum jelly years ago, now days it's 3.5 ounces for dollar at Dollar Tree.
Might work as motor assembly grease, too. I know it does OK on hf free flash light threads.
Advance Auto has tubes of dielectric grease, best price I've found. Hanging on cards near RTV and small tubes of caulk.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Friday, October 3, 2014 9:55:44 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

On a "good" light I would make sure that PJ won't soften the O-rings over time. On a HF light it's probably not worth putting an O-ring in it if it fails...
nate
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On Wednesday, October 1, 2014 8:04:24 PM UTC-4, J Burns wrote:

actually the threads on the V11R feel rough and nasty compared to a Surefire or Streamlight... but I have not yet lubed anythign yet (Super Lube is cheap at HF and works great)
here is the link to the discussion of the specific light that I bought
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?373447-WTS-V11Rvn-amp-RRT01vn-900-Lumen-Pocket-EDC
nate
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On 10/3/2014 9:21 AM, N8N wrote:

For a hundred bucks, they can't grease the threads at the factory?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Friday, October 3, 2014 10:09:45 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

s cheap at HF and works great)

The fact that there's nothing available comparable for less. Did I want to pay that much, no not really, but just like buying from the Snap-On man, a t least you only cry once. Keep in mind the "stock" unmodified light is $7 0 on Amazon...
I tried an EagleTac D25C Ti 219 (only factory-made light I could find that qualified as pocketable, had a UI I liked, and a proper low mode which was what was missing from my previous EDC light) but it lost its modes when usi ng a RCR123A (everything but moonlight was "turbo" mode with the increased voltage of the RCR.) The V11R is infinitely variable output (sometimes you want dim, not bright) and with the mods that I had Vinh do, high is stupid bright and it's got the Nichia 219 high CRI emitter. It'll also run on a CR123A, RCR123A/16340, or with the extender tube an alkaline or NiMH AA cel l (although high probably won't work out well on an alkaline) or 14500. Wi th some minor machine shop work and another extender, it could theoreticall y run off of 16650s or 17670s as well.
Yes, it is very expensive, but then again, I'll be carrying it every day fo r years, so amortized over that period, it's not that expensive at all.
nate
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On 10/3/2014 10:29 AM, N8N wrote:

but just like buying from the Snap-On man, at least you only cry once. Keep in mind the "stock" unmodified light is $70 on Amazon...

a UI I liked, and a proper low mode which was what was missing from my previous EDC light) but it lost its modes when using a RCR123A (everything but moonlight was "turbo" mode with the increased voltage of the RCR.) The V11R is infinitely variable output (sometimes you want dim, not bright) and with the mods that I had Vinh do, high is stupid bright and it's got the Nichia 219 high CRI emitter. It'll also run on a CR123A, RCR123A/ 16340, or with the extender tube an alkaline or NiMH AA cell (although high probably won't work out well on an alkaline) or 14500. With some minor machine shop work and another extender, it could theoretically run off of 16650s or 17670s as well.

that period, it's not that expensive at all.

I've got about $40 or so invested in a mini mag and LED conversion. Fits in my pocket, adjustable beam, and takes AA cells.
I'm not enough of a techie to know why that light is better. One cell? Adjustable light intensity?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Friday, October 3, 2014 10:35:25 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

To me it's a) the flexibility of using several different kinds of cells (so I have a fighting chance of finding *something* that it'll eat at a store if I end up caught out with a dead cell and no spares) b) the high-CRI, ~45 00K emitter for really accurate color rendering c) the availability of a re ally dim mode.
The last reason is why I retired my previous EDC light (a ~$30 Fenix E11, a really good light actually, I beat the crap out of it for several years an d then gave it to my girlfriend as she had no EDC at all) when I discovered that I could not use it to read a book by in a dark hospital room without having to shield it with my hand, as the lower of its two modes was still W AY too bright to not be offensive.
Now for a work only light you probably don't need that capability, but in m y mind a proper EDC, always on your person light should.
If you're happy with your mini mag, more power to you - there's nothing fun damentally wrong with mags and if you look over at CPF people use them as b ases for all kinds of cool conversions as well.
nate
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On 10/3/2014 10:46 AM, N8N wrote:

chance of finding *something* that it'll eat at a store if I end up caught out with a dead cell and no spares) b) the high-CRI, ~4500K emitter for really accurate color rendering c) the availability of a really dim mode.

I beat the crap out of it for several years and then gave it to my girlfriend as she had no EDC at all) when I discovered that I could not use it to read a book by in a dark hospital room without having to shield it with my hand, as the lower of its two modes was still WAY too bright to not be offensive.

on your person light should.

and if you look over at CPF people use them as bases for all kinds of cool conversions as well.

I'll admit, not tried to read book with my mini mag. I can imagine that people have different needs, some folks need long distance to shoot coon out of a tree. All based on what you need.
Thanks for some good ideas. I've never had trouble finding AA cells.
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On Friday, October 3, 2014 11:19:13 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yup, AAs are easy to find... UNTIL there's a panic about a snowstorm or so mething then they all disappear. CR123As on the other hand hold much more energy so most "high end" flashlights are designed around those, also while expensive they tend to last longer in the stores. But your local gun shop will probably sell you a 12 pack of Surefire CR123As for about what the tw o pack of Duracell ones cost in the drug store. And there are rechargeable cells available in both formats (Li-Ion 16340 for CR123A; NiMH aka Eneloop for AA)
Basically, I just like having options. Just got the AA extender tube in th e mail yesterday, although I'm still running a 16340 in it right now.
nate
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On 10/4/2014 8:08 AM, N8N wrote:

all disappear. CR123As on the other hand hold much more energy so most "high end" flashlights are designed around those, also while expensive they tend to last longer in the stores. But your local gun shop will probably sell you a 12 pack of Surefire CR123As for about what the two pack of Duracell ones cost in the drug store. And there are rechargeable cells available in both formats (Li-Ion 16340 for CR123A; NiMH aka Eneloop for AA)

I'm still running a 16340 in it right now.

Hey, mate. I live in NYS, we don't have gun stores. Guns are illegal, here.
You're right about batteries disappearing. I've not had problems with that, I've got plenty at home, and several in my two vehicles. I've heard that C cells are the last ones standing in stores.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/4/14, 8:08 AM, N8N wrote:

One reason I turned down the Fenix HL50 was that I disliked having options when this entailed increasing the size and weight of a headlamp by screwing an extender tube into it.
I use the lower-capacity Eneloops, about 2000 mah, or 2.5 Watt-hours. I haven't used a CR123A for anything, but I see it has 1500 mah or 4.5 Watt-hours. I have to pop a cell into my headlamp twice as often, but it's convenient.
I haven't paid attention to the price of C123a's. I think a Duracell lists for $8. I've been paying about $3 for an Eneloop. By my calculations, the depreciation is a fraction of a penny per charge, and the electricity costs less than depreciation.
When my supply of charged Eneloops runs low, I pop them into the charger instead of driving to a store. If I ran low in a month-long power failure, I'd connect my 1-hour charger to my car battery.
My only experience with Li-ions is in a couple of cameras. I'd prefer that they ran on AA's because the Li-ions take a long time to recharge. The technology seems complicated, and I believe these batteries have a limited service life.
Do I like to argue or what! :)
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On Saturday, October 4, 2014 3:55:55 PM UTC-4, J Burns wrote:

There's pros and cons to both.
Both Li-Ions and lithium primaries have a longer shelf life than do LSD NiM H and alkaline respectively. However they do have more safety consideratio ns than do NiMH and alkaline - Li-Ions can in fact "vent with flame" if mis handled, so while I'll use them, please always use protected cells in multi -cell lights (or just use single cell Li-Ion lights only if you know you're not going to check everything with a multimeter or smart charger)
nate
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On 10/5/2014 8:57 AM, N8N wrote:

However they do have more safety considerations than do NiMH and alkaline - Li-Ions can in fact "vent with flame" if mishandled, so while I'll use them, please always use protected cells in multi-cell lights (or just use single cell Li-Ion lights only if you know you're not going to check everything with a multimeter or smart charger)

One other cell I've had little experience, is the zinc nickel, "Powergenix". A friend suggested these to me, and I bought some. The volatge is slightly higher, and they are damaged by complete discharged. Have to charge them often. At present, found in AA size. Maybe AAA, not sure. I've heard they are no longer made, but available online.
For super long shelf life, Lithium Advanced from Energizer might fit the need. Found in AA cells, again not sure about AAA.
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On Sunday, October 5, 2014 9:15:16 AM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'm not sure what the advantage is of those other than the higher voltage t han NiMH, but in my whole life I have come across two devices that didn't w ork well on a NiMH but would on an alkaline - ironically one was a Nikon di gital camera that was specifically designed to work on NiMH. (Nikon custom er service was completely uninterested, BTW.) The other was I want to say an Amprobe? NCVD which smoked itself after inserting a NiMH. (they have lo wer voltage but also lower internal resistance, so they have been known to smoke poorly designed devices, such as direct-drive LED lights. The "tell" for direct drive will be that they typically have three alkaline cells.) Its Sperry branded replacement works fine however.

yes they are, I just bought some the other day for the little mini flashlig ht that lives in the glovebox of my car (e.g. last resort flashlight) I th ink they are also available in 9V as I looked it up out of curiosity prompt ed by the smoke detector thread.
nate
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On 10/5/2014 9:20 AM, N8N wrote:

I tried NiMH in my computer speakers, but they aren't loud enough for me to hear well. The powergenix make the speakers a bit louder.
A year or so ago, I read testing web site. They found Energizer Lithium Advanced to be better than ultimate.
Two dollars a cell hurts, but it may be worth it when you really need the device. Did you put a non conductive spacer under the bulb to keep from accidental turn on? Or store the batteries out of the unit.
I've got a couple lights at home stored with batteries, but most are separately.
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On 10/5/14, 9:30 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've used wall-powered units so I don't have to fool with batteries. I switched from a JVC boombox to Cyber Acoustics speakers to save space. I thought I'd also save power, but it turns out they use more watts, both off and on, than the boom box. Power consumption is something retailers don't seem to list, but in the long run it can matter more than price.
Nate said NiMH wouldn't run a certain camera. I bought my first NiMH cells with my first digital camera. Before that, I read an online article by a photographer who tested how many shots he got from a charge with various brands. Charged one time, a set of cells could give far different results from the same set charged another time. I think sometimes, the electrolyte may not be distributed well. A charger that shuts off according to dV/dT can be fooled, and a battery of 4 cells is only as good as its weakest cell.
I couldn't predict how long a set of NiMH would last in that camera. Photographers seemed to prefer NiMH because they could take a bigger charge, but NiCd might have worked more reliably.
I used to test AA cells in a battery holder with two 1-ohm resistors in series; it could be used as a 2-ohm or a 1-ohm load. I could connect a battery-powered analog clock in parallel to keep track of elapsed time, and a multimeter to see voltage.
It appeared that memory effect in a NiCd was really a reduction in voltage (increase in internal resistance) after a certain amount of discharge. Discharging and recharging could fix it.
NiMH would often show "substandard" voltage under load. I liked to carry a pocket light with 2 AA cells and 1-amp bulb. If I could get 1.25 V per cell, that was a lot brighter than 1.1 V. Exercising NiMH by discharging and recharging could improve performance.
I've found Eneloops to be wonderfully low in internal resistance... something like 1.3 V at 1 amp through most of their run time. My Fenix headlamp was supposed to produce 2158 candella on high. I found 3600. I checked on medium, and the intensity was as advertised. I checked the current draw on high. As I recall, it was 69% too high. Apparently my Eneloop was capable of feeding the power supply a lot more power than whatever cell Fenix engineers had used in their test.
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