LED bulbs not so bad

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On 11/29/2015 8:35 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Exactly. And, if your lights *seem* brighter than what other folks HAVE BECOME ACCUSTOMED TO, *some* of those folks will indicate this to you -- by flashing *their* "high beams". The same sort of thing happened when halogen lamps came into use. Someone encountering them for the first time would consider them to be (conventional!) lamps "on high".
AFAICT, 2016 is the first model year that our vehicle was released with the LED headlight arrays. In 5 years, folks will have seen enough of them (and similar offerings on other vehicles) that they will just be treated as halogens are, today.
["Oh, he's got those damn bright headlights!" instead of "Hey, buddy, turn off your highs!"]

There is no need to do them independently *if* you design with that in mind! Had they been independent "bulbs", then you must employ some care when designing the "sockets/receptacles" into which they mate -- so a "user" could remove and replace a "light element" and be assured that the new replacement would be sited in exactly the right location.
(imagine being able to replace the *filament* in an old sealed beam headlight -- and having to ensure it was a the proper focus of the reflector!)
Placing the actual LED emitters on the circuit board can be done with high precision (by machine). And, the actual fabrication of the LED "chips" (die) is, of necessity, a very precise operation. So, it's not unreasonable to expect that to be created as a highly repeatable "assembly".
The plastic enclosure to which it mates can likewise be reproduced "identically" -- ensuring that the circuit board(s) fit into precisely the same places in every unit manufactured.
It would be hard to imagine the design of the car would NOT incorporate provisions for aiming. It's too large of an object (the car's body) to get that sort of precise placement of an assembly WITHOUT an adjustment (i.e., that same 1:150 would apply to the precision of any body mounts for the assembly; if you're off 1 part in 150 on an assembly that is ~a few inches tall, you've botched the "aim"!).
And, you have to KNOW that this assembly WILL need to be replaced from time to time (collisions). Expecting the body shop to recreate the front end to that high degree of precision (outlined above) is just delusional! ("Joe, I need a bigger hammer...")
I'll see what my neighbor has to say, later today (too early to bother folks on a Sunday). See how often he cites folks for "headlight violations"...
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On 11/28/2015 11:12 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Depends on which car you are talking about. Sitting in the driver's seat, the light is limited on the left side to it is not in the eyes of the driver in the oncoming car. if you are in Japan, Australia, England,India or parts of Africa reverse the comments.
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On 11/28/2015 10:24 AM, Don Y wrote:

1) blame someone else, for your lack of corrective action and continuing to offend other drivers 2) Refer to some thing unrelated, to try change subject.
I'm quite disappointed in you. I thought you were an adult.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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On 11/28/2015 1:30 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

If I was "continuing to offend other drivers", don't you think folks would be flashing their lights at us EVERY DAY? And, when approaching from a distance?
Perrhpas I should wander over to the sheriff's house behind me and have him "inspect" the vehicle? Would you require a NOTARIZED statement from him to indicate they are in compliance?
Then, would you require me to chase down the drivers that have *mistakenly* assumed we had our "highs" on and inform them that they need to adjust their seats, get cataract surgery or whatever else caused them to react thusly?
Or, perhaps change the statutes so all headlights are a fixed distance above grade, all roads perfectly level and all occupants seated at a given elevation above said roadway to ensure their eyes can never stray into a beam of light?

How did my reference to HID/halogen lights "change the subject"? Are they not also lights -- albeit with different output characteristics?

I'll leave you to chase down those ordinances for us, now...
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Don Y wrote:

Cataract, etc. to aging eyes all bright lights are bothersome. That is why I wear custom fit glasses when driving. I don't need help seeing just to reduce the glare and brightness. OEM lights are not so much a problem. All those improperly installed after market stuffs are usually bad and illegal. Intensity and colors, what not. Those improper installation can even cause fire on the wiring.
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On 11/28/2015 2:32 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

We live in an area know for retirees. People don't come here for careers but, rather, to get away from the cold, enjoy the outdoors year round, etc.
SWMBO has already had both eyes done. As have many of our friends.
So far, I don't think I have much vision loss from that sort of thing. Though I notice my near-in vision is now degrading (can't read small print at anything closer than ~18".
Distance vision has been a problem for decades -- mainly due to astigmatism. Without glasses, I *count* the letters in street name signs to determine if it's likely to be the street that I am looking for. :>
OTOH, I *do* notice that my eyes are much slower in reacting to intensity changes. Looking at a bright object and then trying to read something less well lit takes a noticeable amount of time.
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Don Y wrote:

I realized my eye sight is not what it used to be when I installed remote starter on a car lately. wiring half dozen wires after finding them from the harness, soldering wires under the dash in awkward position. I don't think I can do the job any more after this one. Lucky I did not make any mistakes. Couple glitches, I could fix by reflashing Blade firmware setting some option bits.
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On 11/28/2015 7:27 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I do "fine work" with a stereo microscope that gives me about 30X magnification (great for working with "fine pitch" electronic components). The binocular nature gives me some depth perception so I'm not just looking at a "flat" image. If I have to do a lot of it, I can hook up a camera to the eyepiece and watch it on a monitor (sacrificing the depth perception).
<http://www.recycledgoods.com/bausch-lomb-7x-30x-stereo-microscope-with-boom-stand.html I "discovered" my near vision issue trying to plug a cable into the rear of one of my PC's. They are all located on the floor beneath my work benches. So, the backs of each are perhaps 6 inches from the wall -- enough clearance for cables, etc.
*But*, when trying to peer behind them (without moving them as that is difficult with all the attached cables), you need to be pretty close to see the detail you need. Sort of cramming your head up against the wall and trying to "bend" your vision to see in the back side.
At this close range, things are now too blurry to make out even the overall shape of connector shells (e.g., is this 'D' shell narrow on top? or bottom?).
Now, I use an autofocus camera that is coupled to a pair of LCD monitors installed in *eyeglasses*. Put the glasses on, point the camera in the right direction and you see whatever *it* sees -- regardless of the direction your head is facing!
<http://www.ebay.com/itm/Low-Vision-Portable-Magnifier-FlipperPort-CCTV-by-Enhanced-Vision-/231038372112?hash=item35caf5c910:g:qiQAAOxy9LxSFoeo (The set of smaller photos in the listing can be examined for more details)
So, no need to cram into that tiny space anymore. OTOH, it is "confusing" to be looking in one direction and moving your arms/hands in an entirely different direction... and convincing your brain that this is "normal"! :<
For things like connector orientation, I cheat and just take a *photo* with an autofocus camera -- then "preview" the resulting image before deleting it!
[ObTrivia: digital cameras make cheap Ir remote testers!]
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Don Y posted for all of us...

Don't reply to this fool. If one looks at a late model car the vertical cutoff of headlights is really severe. Of course if Stumped has a 30 yr old overloaded van with Stumpy "upgrades" then yeah it's blinding. Put your eyes on the fog line and you can see.
--
Tekkie

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Tekkie® wrote:

when kid, driver training manual mentioned not to look straight to oncoming lights. Look sort of little sideways. I still do.
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On 11/28/2015 2:40 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

When you're sitting at a light with another oncoming vehicle *directly* in front of you (e.g., both of you in your center/left-turn lanes) you usually don't have a choice.
Likewise, if someone pulls up behind you, you don't have a choice.
(We pulled up behind an MGB this afternoon. Had our headlights been on, they would have gone over that driver's head!)
Driving in front of a Hummer, lifted truck, etc. in a "conventional" car leaves you in this situation. Even turning the center rear view mirror aside, you're still blasted with light from both (properly aimed!) side mirrors as well as the flood of light coming in through your rear window.
And, he's going to *stay* there for some period of time (indefinitely if you're at a traffic signal) -- or, until you annoy him enough to get him to pass you...
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On 11/28/2015 1:59 PM, Tekkie® wrote:

<grin> I was driving from Chitown to Beantown many years ago. Hit fog somewhere in Indiana. Kept to the left lane (commensurate with my speed) and tracked the solid white line (divided highway). Proud of my cleverness (foolishness?)! Everyone following on my tail -- no doubt clinging to my tail lights.
Until I got to a stretch in Ohio (?) where the roadway had been repaved.
And, none of the markings yet painted!
Immediately slowed down -- which brought loud protestations from the horns of all those folks riding behind me! New puzzle: how do I find the *right* edge of the roadway (so I can be Mr Slowpoke) without any means of knowing when I've crossed a lane -- or three!
I suspect I would do lots of things differently, at my current age!
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On 11/28/2015 8:24 AM, Don Y wrote:

Caught up with my sheriff neighbor late last night so he could see the lights "after dark": "I don't see anything wrong with them. Car is brand new, right?" "Yeah" "Then their probably set correctly." "Then why the headlight flashes?" "They're bright. The HID's on my daughter's car are pretty bright, too. Compare this car to your other car and note the difference in intensity, color, beam pattern, ..." "So, all in the other drivers' imagination?" "<shrug> If you're worried about it, ask the dealer to check them. But, I'd never cite you for them!" This morning, had a visit scheduled with dealer to resolve a rubbing noise: "Hey, can you check the headlights, please? Folks have been flashing their brights at us at night when our brights haven't been *on*!" "<laugh> Yeah, these lights seem to be a lot brighter than many drivers are used to..." "Could you double check, just the same?" "Sure." Fifteen minutes later, "no problem, they're 'spot on'!"
But, at least the car got a free bath and replacement battery in SWMBO's key fob!
So, occam's razor proves itself to be the proper diagnostic approach: the simplest explanation (drivers aren't used to encountering them, yet) is the correct one!
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Stormin Mormon wrote in alt.home.repair:

Agreed. In Virgnia, it's part of the annual inspection to ensure the tilt it maintained so you do not blind (and thereby endanger) other drivers.
If folks flash their lights at you, you have something wrong and need to fix it.
--


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On 11/28/2015 1:25 PM, cshenk wrote:

Well, that sure was simple concept. Now, watch Don Y. dance around some more.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 11/28/2015 1:34 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'm waiting for someone to quote a legislative reference. Saying "it's part of an annual inspection" says nothing about what the criteria are!
I doubt you'll find "folks flashing their lights" anywhere in those ordinances! :>
Your turn to dance...
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On 11/28/2015 3:51 PM, Don Y wrote:

So, you reply only with some absurd thing about the legislation and totally ignore the simple concpet. BTW, Don, that was a good and predictble dance.
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Stormin Mormon wrote in alt.home.repair:

Grin, BTW, likely no one here remembers me but i remember you. I left many newsgroups 2-3 years ago and came back to this one yesterday. I think I recognize Tony Hwang and a few others as well.
Anyways, I recall my lights failing the tilt test in about 2000, a Ford Escort then. It wasn't terribly expensive. It was one of the 2 headlights.
It happened to a friend of mine with an SUV as well. She got it used and they had to adjust them. Both headlights in her case.
I do not know if this is a common test for state inspection in all states.
What I do know is if folks are flapping beams at you, there's something wrong. People do not do that for the fun of it. If they are doing it at a stop light, then your settings really ARE off.
The science I recall on this type of thing is pretty basic. The main beam of your vehicle's headlights should hit x feet ahead on the pavement. If your vehicle is taller, that means a steeper incline setting.
The angle of my Maxima would not be the same as that of a Ford F150 but the light spread is pretty much the same if correctly set.
--


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Oren wrote in alt.home.repair:

Hi Oren! I remember your name too.
--


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On 11/27/2015 9:00 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

One annoyance of getting a new car.
The string of LED's around tail lights looks chincy, particularly on expensive cars.
Those that want to grow their pot with them should look at spectra of light output. There is more UV but not sure how else they might affect growth.
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