LED Bulb dying

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On 09/16/2016 06:31 PM, FromTheRafters wrote:

Criminy! They even have software for it now! I could have used that 30 years ago!

You got that.
My opinion, MTBF is only useful if you are comparing one MTBF number to another.
Thank you for the links, -T
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If you operate a ssd in a reasonable environment and dont expose it to surg es, no reason to think 137 years is unrealistic. Silicon doesnt turn back to sand in 5 years, if ever. Semiconductor devices are well understood, ex tensively studied and i would trust intel numbers before bs from a guy that posted about "mbtf".
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wrote:

50,000 hours should not be out of reach for a properly designed and constructed LED lighting device. However, you don't generally get one of those for 2 bucks. You only get what you pay for - and even there a fair measure of good luck is required!!!
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Vince Foster posted for all of us...

I was going to post a reply like this but too lazy to figure out how many hours in the year. The bulb probably didn't have a longevity on the package so it means FOREVER in his mind.
--
Tekkie

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On Sat, 10 Sep 2016 13:15:41 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

All those years is based on three hours per day. Since you are running it 24/7, then you divide all those years by eight. So that gives you 2.5 to 3 years.
There is no payback on LED bulbs rarely used. I have been in my house for 20 years. It is a large house with many lights (in closets and all). There are a few bulbs still working from the prior owner. And many that I have only replaced once.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 9/10/2016 5:49 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

My house, over 40 years old, came with krypton super bulbs and a few of them sparsely used are still working.
Just started using led's but discovered cfl's in bathrooms last no longer than incandescent. Think it is due to short periodic use. Your bulb should have lasted a long time but I have found led flashlights that did not last long. Bulb component may be fine but there are transformers for dc led bulbs and cfl's and components there in may fail. Flashlights most likely the switch. While yours burned constantly in an unheated barn where temperatures could vary over 100 deg F over a year the bulb and components were subjected to that stress which may have limited its lifetime.
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On Saturday, September 10, 2016 at 6:04:40 PM UTC-5, Frank wrote:

Moisture in bathrooms also lessens the life of cfl's.
Andy
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Reminds me of the X-10 modules I was buying in 1988. They used cheap electrolytic capacitors which soon failed. The modules then chattered.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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wrote:

into even "quality" capacitors that almost forced several large respected electronic companies into bankruptsy.
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On Sat, 10 Sep 2016 13:15:41 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I had another identical bulb in another part of the barn. That one was installed about the same time and was also left on all the time. That one is now dead too, except that one is completely dead. I tried it in another socket, DEAD !!!!
Interesting how both had about the same life span.....
I replaced both today with new LED bulbs (another brand).
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On 09/16/2016 08:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

You may not be getting the heat out. Tip: don't install it hanging down. The heat will go straight up into the cheap assed circuitry
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On 9/16/2016 11:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

It was probably made in an ISO9000 certified plant. It does not mean they make good products, just that they are consistent.
I hope the other brand does better.
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On 09/17/2016 06:26 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I worked for a company that did that once. It made zero difference in product quality. It was just a bunch of paperwork to get the label.
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I worked for a large company and every couple of years there would be some program. None of them made any difference. Like you said, just a bunch of paperwork to get the label.
We had iso 9000, six sigma, team concept, tpm, deversity training, some kind of exercising before starting work, and probably some more that I have forgotten. Usually after the training part of the program ended , it was back to the old way about 6 months or less later. We started one or two programs but they faded out before everyone in the plant had gone through it. That was when we had close to 3000 people in the plant.
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On Sat, 17 Sep 2016 19:48:55 -0400, Ralph Mowery

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca;3625462 Wrote: > On Sat, 17 Sep 2016 19:48:55 -0400,

concepts. And then blame employees for resulting failures. What Ralph Mowery posted is routine when a boss is the enemy. Subverts what he cannot understand. That says business school concepts are the reason for so many failures.
They could not find even one engineer who said it was safe to launch the Challenger. Engineers were not even permitted to participate in a vote. Those business school graduates knew only they - trained managers - could make that decision. So they killed seven astronauts. Just another example of what happens when business school training denies and subverts well proven methods and solutions.
--
westom


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On 09/17/2016 07:17 PM, westom wrote:

I can disagree with. Been there, done that. Tears.
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On 09/17/2016 07:17 PM, westom wrote:

I once took a weeks seminar a company threw on quality circles and Deming's quality controls. And after that if your even tried to follow one millimeter of what was taught, you almost got fired. The middle level manager saw to it that NOTHING changed.
-T
Oh ya, we made a lot of crap.
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On 09/17/2016 10:48 PM, T wrote:

Sorry, I misstated that. We made a lot of ISO9000 crap.
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snipped-for-privacy@diybanter.com says...

power plant melted down was caused by management that did not know how things worked. I have a cousin in the power business. He talked to some that were involved in that. Seems there was a problem but the actual operators were getting things under control by doing things that are not 'in the book'. Management stepped in and started telling them how to do things and that was when the melt down started.
Same as what I saw where I work. We made polyester. Mixed a powder and liquid at 300 deg C. One of the process lines started having problems and some supervisor that did not know the process started giving orders. The operators tried to tell him he was wrong,but they had to do what he said. Really made a mess of things. Saw that happen several times. Those were not small mistakes, but cost the company over $ 100,000 each time. Bad thing about it is the supervisors and engineers that were calling the shots did not get fired over it.
Found out one day why the management was so bad. There was an opeartor that was no good at all. His supervisor said he either had to fire the fat SOB or make him a supervisor. It was just easier to make him a supervisor than to fire him. At that period of time all the company seemed to require was that you showed up each day for work and did not falsify the company recored or time card.
A supervisor tried to fire someone and when he took that person to the plant manager, the manager looked at all the paper work and said I can not fire that man,he has been her 4 years and never missed a day. Did not even look at the reasons for firing the man.
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