LED Bulb dying

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I thought LED bulbs were supposed to last for many years. I put on in my barn about 2 years ago. It's on all the time as a safety light. It only uses about 5 watts so I'm not concerned about energy usage. (25W equivlent).
All of a sudden it has gotten real dim, and it flickers. I'm wondering what caused that? I know it cant be fixed and needs to be replaced, but I did not think the LED bulbs were supposed to fail for many years.
When I shut it off, it stays lit for a few seconds after the switch is OFF, so I imagine there is a capacitor in it, but obviously that cap is working..... But it's less than half as bright as it used to be, and flickers.
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

check the wiring too...
songbird
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On 09/10/2016 11:20 AM, songbird wrote:

1+ on Songbird advice.
Try a known good bulb in the same socket. If the symptom repeats, call an electrician IMMEDIATELY.
You also try the suspect bulb somewhere else with a known good socket (the socket's current resident works properly).
If not, replace the bulb and be careful of cheap bulbs.
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wrote:

It's not the wiring - its cheapassed chinese electronics rearing it's ugly head again. Proper circuit design and assembly yields LED lights that last for years. Cheapassed engineering and sloppy assembly yields LED lights that can last as little as 100 hours. If the engineering is OK and only the assembly is slipshod, you may get about 1 in 10 (as I did on a large installation) lasting 3 or more years
On some the electronics just fail, in others the electronics cause the LED to fail, and on others the LED fails because it is not properly heat-sinked.
SOME chinese products have decent quality control, but it is definitely a case of caviat your emptor - or something like that.
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On 09/10/2016 08:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

3C: Cheap Chinese Crap. Sad to say, but Americans can't get enough of it.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...songbird asked...

ok,
just that i had a direct wired LED light fail, but it was actually the wiring that went instead, which i didn't check until after i'd returned the unit and put the replacement in and it still didn't work.
songbird
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wrote:

But it didn't fail in the way the OP's failed Leds going dim and flickering are a bad LED. Going right out can be wiring. Strobing is also a bad LED - usually a low voltage one (12 volt instead of 120)
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On 09/11/2016 05:17 AM, songbird wrote:

You got that! CFL's will last a log time too, but no one will spend the necessary money on one to achieve it.
White LED's are actually more fragile than you would think. You have to get the heat out or they lose their ability to shed light. Colored ones can take a lot more heat.

Hi Songbird,
I am an Electrical Engineer. You are not off track. You are following best practice in troubleshooting. Clare is just looking at what is most probable. There is just a tiny bit of cross talk here.
Basically, your advice was spot on. If a fresh bulb doesn't change the symptom, or trying the suspect bulb out on another wiring run and the bulb works properly, it is the wiring and could be a danger to the structure.
Now, back to my zucchini!
-T
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On 9/10/2016 10:15 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

try it in a different socket.
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says...

The living should envy the dead.
--

Checkmate, Royal Order of the DoW #1, and Official Ko0K Wrangler
AUK Hammer of Thor award, Feb. 2012 (Pre-Burnore)
  Click to see the full signature.
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'Checkmate, DoW #1[_2_ Wrote: > ;3623024'] > Do you even know what a full wave bridge is? Its also called a pontoon bridge. Anyone who it not dim knows that.
A full wave bridge is necessary to keep LEDs above bigger waves.
LEDs work best when a constant current source is beneath that bridge. Current must be constant and only in one direction (always a DC or downstream current).
--
westom


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On 09/10/2016 01:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

By your own account, the bulb lasted about 17,000 hours. You cheapasscow, WTF do you want?
STFU and go buy another one.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/60W-Equivalent-Soft-White-A19-Non-Dimmable-LED-Light-Bulb-RLA1027ND/206587566
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On 9/10/2016 3:09 PM, Vince Foster wrote:

17,000 is probably a bit on the low end but in tolerance for MTBF. I don't see any specific warrantied hours, but 20,000 to 50,000 seems to be expected.
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On 09/10/2016 03:41 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Manufacturers lie. Re bulb life, divide their optimistic bullshit number by 2 and you'll be closer to reality...but you already knew that.
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On 09/10/2016 12:41 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hi Ed,
That is not what MBTF means. If the bulb had, say 1000 hour MBTF, it would mean that you put 1000 bulbs in a test bench and ran them for an hour. Only one failed. MBTF does not tell you anything about the second and so forth hours. (I did MBTF analysis for the military.)
A good gauge of how long something will last is the warranty. They taught us in college to set it at 90% of useful lifespan. Course, some manufacturers are just lazy and set it at a year.
-T
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And others figure (correctly in most cases) a customer will not spend $8 to send the defective unit back to china to get a $2 part replaced under warranty.
It was bad enough when a "lifetime warranteed" memory module for my laptop failed and one way shipping to return it to the "manufacturer" in California cost me $18, it took over 3 weeks to get it replaced, and I could buy another "lifetime guaranteed" module locally for $22..
I returned it "just on principal" and couldn't wate for it to be returned so bought one locally anyway. Now I have an obvsolete brand new memory module sitting in stock that I'll likely never use, that effectively cost me $40.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

I remember seeing some socket sets that had the lifetime guarantee. They cost about $ 5. If oe broke you sent the old one back and $ 4.95 for shipping and handling to get it replaced.
Except for very bit ticket items, the warrenty does not seem to be worth vrey much. Even the home warrenty you can get when you buy a house seems worthless if you count up all the costs.
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That is why I do not like to buy through the mail. Within 90 days, I expect a local dealer to replace or refund a defective item.
With regard to LED Bulb reliability, why should it be much different from CFL Bulbs? I have taken some defective CFL Bulbs apart and found the defect is mostly due to an electronic part failure. Often they do not they last long enough for the Fluorescent tube to turn black from use.
Fred
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On Sun, 11 Sep 2016 10:41:57 -0400, Ralph Mowery

MOST home warrantees are a total expense -you'd have to buy a realshack for it to ever pay off - and even then the exclusions would end up killing you. Extended warrantees on complex home electronics MAY be worthwhile - particularly if they also cover accidental damage or loss.
Tool warrantees on tools you buy locally and get coverage at point of sale can be worthwhile - particularly when they are a universal warranty. Snap-on warrants their hand tools - replace "at the truck" Craftsman warrantee was at any sears store. Mastercraft pro tools - any Canadian Tire store, Proto at any UAP, etc.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

Most of the tool warrantees that I have seen are already factored in the price of the tool from the more expensive brands. YOu do not have the option of one or not. That is if I go to Sears and get a Craftsman wrench it will cost a certain price and I can not opt out of the warrantee to get for a lesser price. If I buy an oven from them, they will try to sell me an extended warrantee. I do have a choice on that.
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