Leave furnace blower running 24/7?

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I recently had some A/C service done, and the tech recommended that I leave the furnace blower running constantly, letting the heat and cooling come on as needed. The theory is that is would "even out" the air temperatures throughout the house (I have a 2-story house with basement, dual zone system). Makes sense to me, but wanted to know what the smart folks in this ng thought?
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heating problem but in the summer its harder to cool evenly. My down stairs was comfortable and upstairs too warm. I have vents on the wall floor level. I purchased angled plastic to shoot the cold air up and re adjusted all the vents to have less cold air down and keep the vents upstairs open all the way. The ac runs a little longer but its more comfortable all over. PLUS I KEEP THE FAN RUNNING 24/7 it helps a lot try and see what you think.
mike
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It will keep you more even and clean your air better , but figure the cost. I pay 0.12 KWH my fan pulls apx 400 watts or 9600 a day , at 0.12 thats 1.152 a day or 34.56 a month. Well my entire electric bill last month was 15. I think I like the savings of 350 a year, but you may enjoy the comfort Also fan motors only last just so long.
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That's 9600 watt-hours or 9.6 kWh per day.
Nick
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Fan motors, like other types of motors and light bulbs are stressed the most on starting up. Run the motor 24/7/360, and it will last a long time. I run mine continuously and it is now 18 years old.

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Eric Tonks wrote:

I've been here 13 years and just last month replaced a fan motor that had been running 24/7.
Of course the motor was the original from the '60's, so the life expectancy of a 24/7 motor is somewhere between 13 and 40 years.
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Sure run it 24x7 to save the motor , and heat - cool more evenly or just do what is smart . get a better thermostat or adjust your anticipator for less swing , or get the proper equipment with a DC motor . Or get a better tech.
My last motor was original, 40 yrs old and consumed apx 550 watts. The furnace never runs more than 8 hrs a day in winter at -10f and avg over the whole summer 1 hr a day. So say in winter for 6 months I would be adding 16 hrs and in summer for 6 months 23 hrs running. So in winter I would add 8.8 kwh daily, 264 kwh mo. 1584 kwh - 6 mo x 0.12 kwh for an increase $ 190.00 . In summer 12.65 kwh daily 379.5 mo. 2277 - 6 mo x .012 kwh = $273.24 or $463.24 a year or 9264.80 over 20 yrs or an axp 40000.00 -50000.00 with compounded interest . Sure everybodys run time is different but many of you have much bigger unefficient motors pulling Double this amount or more.
So how many motors and doughnuts can you buy for $ 40 - 50000.00 thousand thousand thousand. And for what , better air flow?
Go buy a new furnace with a DC motor that consumes 50% less and a Cadillac first.
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replying to m Ransley, Batjo wrote:

Running constant fan is not going to hurt your equipment, but if the ducting is leaking to the exterior; it will amplify any losses you may already have. As air leaves the building through leaks in the ducting, it is replaced by air infiltrating through crawl space, attic etc.
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Batjo wrote:

Also run it at lower speed if wanted. My electric power costs 8 cents/KWh fixed for next 4 years. Monthly average usage is 1200KWh. High efficieency blower motors are DC driven which has higher efficiency.
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On Wednesday, February 5, 2014 8:44:01 PM UTC-5, Batjo wrote:

I'd add to that, it's very dependent on how the system is actually installed. If all the ducting runs only in heated parts of the building, then the potential for heat loss is little. If the furnace is in an unheated basement or even worse, an attic, some ducts run through outside walls, etc, then it's going to be a losing proposition for sure. Plus, I don't see the need. All the houses I've lived in with furnaces it was comfortable with the fan just running when the furnace was on.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It is not just comfort, indoor air quality may improve.
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With a good filter installed, it will also help get a lot of the dust out of the air.
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In my previous house, I ran mine all the time during the summer to de-ice the a/c coils between cooling cycles. Compared to the power used by the compressor, the cost of running the fan was nothing.
Bob

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It was a new Clayton trailer home. Clayton used ducts that were too small and airflow was inadequate as far as I was concerned. Clayton said it was adequate. Trailer homes are built to minimum specs. I agree it shouldn't have been like that, but it was. A local heating contractor told me the only solution would have been to put in larger ductwork to get adequate airflow. Clayton, by the way, is bottom of the line. I learned a lot when I bought that home. Now I live in a site built home. No more trailer homes for me.
Bob

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Gotcha....

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On Friday, May 14, 2004 8:34:15 AM UTC-4, rck wrote:

If you coils were icing up your system needed charging.
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On 2/6/2014 10:10 AM, jamesgang wrote:

That's one of several things that can cause evaporator icing.
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Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

I also would like to hear what others have to say about this.I have been keeping my AC in the fan position but keep it on auto during the heating season. I did some un-scientific testing after having my Central AC installed a few years ago.I found that the AC compressor ran only a little more than half as often if the FAN was allowed to run all of the time. Also the house comfort level seems better with the air constantly moving.
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