Leaky outdoor faucet --> bigger problem?

I have a leaky outdoor faucet. It is one of three outside faucets I have at my house. There are two in the front of the house that I can see are threaded onto the pipe. The third faucet (the leaking one) I assumed is threaded also, but it is difficult to see behind the bibb part of the faucet, but there is definitely a nut type fitting there.
With a wrench on that and another on the faucet itself I tried to unscrew the faucet, but instead the entire pipe turned inside the wall (apparently had the incorrect size wrench on the back of the faucet). I may have turned the entire pipe inside the wall as much as 90 degrees counter clockwise. The pipe is copper. While I turned it back to normal, (never could get the *&^*%$ faucet off), I am now paranoid I may have crimped or twisted the pipe enough inside the wall for it to be leaking. I did not notice or hear water when I turned the water back on, but if it is a slow drip.... Is there a way to tell short of the siding rotting out in a few months? The room behind the faucet is a utility room, which I guess I could tear into the wall if necessary (sigh). How do I get the faucet off?
Thanks for any ideas.. Dukester
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first whats wrong with the faucet? leaky at stem tighten packing nut a 1/2 turn? bad washer etc.
once you fix faucet turn water on, outside valve off, then turn inside valve off, wait a couple days see if you hear water run when you turn supply valve back on.
a low tech way to test for leaks
the faucet is likely sweated err soldered to the pipe
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What hallerb said is correct. However, considering your lack of knowledge about how the faucet's attached to the pipe, I suspect that what he said is beyond your understanding at this stage. I'd strongly suggest that you go to a plumbing supply or real hardware store, take a faucet off the display and ask someone to show you how to disassemble and rebuilt it. Otherwise, you may have a trout pond in your basement next.
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On Sun, 1 Jul 2007 20:09:08 -0500, "Dukester"

Whbere is it leaking.

Have you looked at the pipe from the inside?
I doubt very much if the pipe terminates in the wall.
You think you actually twisted the whole pipe to bend it. Did you feel it "give", resist turning and then pretty suddenly turn much more easily? Was it harder to turn back than it had been to turn the first time (not counting when it wouldn't turn at all)? Yeses to these questions would be signs of twisting, if twisting is possible
Can you stick something into the hole from the inside of the house, parallel to, next to, below the pipe. When you pull it out, is it wet?

Other people know that.

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if it is a copper pipe that turned as much as 90 degrees, then I would open that wall because a solder joint was probably bent and it could result in a leak inside the wall and cause lots of damage if left to run for a prolonged period.. and youll be able to just cut the old pipe and faucet off and replace it..
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This is why I like galvanized pipe instead of copper. I've seen this type of thing happen too many times.
Anyway best to tear apart the wall and see what has happened inside. You will sleep better.
And while wall torn apart, you can go ahead and replace the copper pipe with galvanized to a certain point where you can clamp it to a stud. Maybe install an elbow and go up a few inches with galvanized and clamp it down.
Then won't have to worry about this happening again!
I would look at this as a good learning experience. Can learn a bit about plumbing. Redesigning things so they are easier to fix in the future. And a bit of drywalling to boot.
This is the way repair goes. Sometimes you have a good day and things are easy to fix - no problems. Other times one repair job which you think will cost $10 turns out to be a $100 repair job! But I would rather spend the 2 cents ($100) and do it right.
"Dukester" wrote in message

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A trip to the library would've prevented the problem entirely.
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On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 13:45:26 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

faucet? Sheeesh.
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Obvious to you and I, but not to the guy who may have wrecked his pipes. Five minutes with a repair book would've prevented this.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

And you think you'll find a repair book at a library? Oh you'll find the best sellers, paperback historical romances, hand-puppets, video games, art work, and discussion classes, but not repair books.
Heck, there's even one library (in Berkely, where else) where you can check out tools such as gasoline post-hole diggers, compressors, paint-sprayers, chain saws, scaffolding, ladders, etc.
But they don't have repair books either.
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HeyBub wrote:

Pretty unusual (but then again, that would be Berekely) for a general-circulation library in my experience to not have at least a moderate collection of such...
--
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Are you saying that in or around San Francisco, the libraries do not carry books on home repair in general, and specifically plumbing?
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so your happy having to replace the galvanized when it rusts, clogs or leaks.
theres no reason you cant use copper, or PEX for that matter
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On Sun, 1 Jul 2007 20:09:08 -0500, "Dukester"

I'd just unscrew it again all the way off. Whatever happens, happens. Then just put the new faucet (and pipe) back with lots of plumbers helper or teflon tape, your choice.
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