Leaky Joint in lead soil pipe

The soil pipe for my toilet has a joint where the lavatory connects. I guess this was common before. Well, the joint at the toilet bend and lavatory has started leaking. The floor of the bathroom is tile and about 3 inches of concrete, which the lavatory drain pipe is embedded. Obviously, repair could be messy and destructive if some of the floor is removed. I was able to use my Dremel and remove about 2 inches of the concrete under the toilet to fully expose the crack in the lead joint.
What I would like to know is, what can I use to seal the crack? Silicon caulk or epoxy putty or what? If I can get a repair that lasts a few years that would be great, until remodeling occurs.
-    Greg
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Gregory Bonk wrote:

Yes, for a temp repair on this kind of thing I like silicone (RTV). It gives some flexibility and bonds well. Wire brush the crack as there likely is corrosion. It could be soldered but I think the risks are greater than any payback.
Jim
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Gregory Bonk wrote:

I suggest you find a professional who is old enough to have worked on a few such pipes. They are very repairable and long lasting when done right, but it takes a little experience to get it right and know how to do it. It may cost less than you think.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 19:43:33 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

I guess that means me. I did plumbing for quite a few years and did repair lead pipes more times than I wanted. I am also OLD :)
I tend to be confused. If the floor is concrete, then I assume there is no basement. So how do you know about the leak? I also assume you are trying to repair with the toilet off, from the inside of the pipe. Tearing up the floor would be a major job. You can use JB Weld, and that stuff is great and lasts. However, you MUST thoroughly dry and clean the pipe, including inside the crack. (Not easy to do from the inside). But, that may be your only option.
Let us all know what you did.
Mark
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snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com (Gregory Bonk) wrote in message

Did you say lead? Make sure it is lead. If it is, I am surprised it has lasted this long. I have a rental built likely in the 40's. At that time the toilet uses a lead bend. The lead bend in the toilet has been replaced by PVC bend in my rental. It goes into the cast iron stack. I did not remove the lead bend completely. Left a short stub section so I could connect the new PVC bend with a rubber connector.
I presume the longer term solution is to dig out the lead bend completely. That's a lot of work.
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snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com (Gregory Bonk) wrote in message

Thanks guys. I talked to a couple of plumbers. I used my dremel and a wire brush to clean the pipe. I put an epoxy puddy on the outide, and an epoxy marine adhesive on the inside, and no more leak. We'll see how long it lasts though. After inspecting the rot and cieling damage it looks like this has been leaking for YEARS.
- Greg
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