leaking toilet - changed wax ring 3 times

OK here is the deal. When my father in law stays with us we need to change the wax ring. I am thinking his weight is causing the toilet to leak around the base/wax ring.
What could be the problem? The toilet seems to be flush with the old hardwood floor. Seeems to be that is. There are a few old spots where there was also some minor water damage so I am thinking that maybe the toliet is not flush. Is there an alternative to a wax ring? Is there any kind of expansion ring or kit I can purchase.
I was thinking that if his weight is causing the problem then maybe I have to shim the toilet around it's base whenre it is "MAYBE" no flush with the floow. Any thoughts/comments/advice.
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Use a Fernco waxless toilet ring - problem solved.
Harry K
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wrote:

I agree with the fix.
However, you have a moving toilet and a stationary drain. I'd want to fix the moving toilet. You need to add bracing under the flooring to stabilize the toilet. Concrete pillar or tile or something hard, not wood.
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On Mon, 06 Aug 2007 01:51:06 GMT, "Doobielicious"

How much does he weigh? How much do you weigh?

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I weigh 185. He weighs 350 - 400. He's a huge strapping man.
wrote:

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wrote:

isn't 'huge and strapping', it is clinical morbid obesity. Your wife must be young- fellows that size to not tend to live long lives.
Might I recommend a reinforced floor (extra blocking in the joist spaces around toilet, and double-layer subfloor, screwed down), and an institutional-grade toilet? Maybe even a 3 or 4 joist-space wide helper beam and screw post under the toilet, if there are no load walls nearby? They had a fellow that size in our office, and finally ended up modifying one stall just for him, ripping out the wall-hung and putting a floor-mounted stainless-steel unit.
I'm no expert, but anyone that big is flexing the whole floor, including the last few feet of the waste line. Not at all suprising the ring is losing its seal. One of those waxless rings with the rubber horn on it may help. What does he have at his house?
aem sends...
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He's 76 and is 6'3". He used to work in the woods cutting and hauling trees. He is a big strapping man.
wrote:

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I honestly don't think your father-in-law's weight is all that relevant to the toilet leak around the base of the toilet. Here is what I think is happening with your leaking toilet. It is normal that over time, because of wear and tear, water will start to seep around the base of a toilet because of an old wax ring that no longer seals against the drain, or by a cracked toilet base. If the leaking happens during or just after you flush, then you should replace the wax ring with the rubber sleeve; you could even add an extra wax ring by placing it on top of the new wax ring to ensure that the space between the toilet base and the toilet flange is completely sealed off when put the toilet back over the drain. Replace the floor bolts if you need to, especially if the old bolts are stripped or damaged. You should apply a bead of plumber's putty to the bottom edge of toilet base prior to placing the toilet over the drain. On the other hand, if the leaking is constant, then the toilet base is cracked which basically means that you need to replace the toilet itself. I hope this bit of info will help you solve the leak.
Good luck!
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On Thu, 09 Aug 2007 20:26:34 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

People here have recommended that the putty or caulk not go entirely around the toilet base, but have a gap in the rear, so that leaking water can get out, and warn the user that the toilet is leaking, before rotting the wood etc.

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