leaking oil into the tub?

10 year old Moffat Washing Machine- has been no problem until it started leaving a 'dirty' ring around the top of the tub. Have also noticed a few small spots on clothes. It's definitely oil. Is this the transmission ( as I have read it could be)? Is it worth a repairman's visit or should I go straight to purchasing new?
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On 10/04/2015 09:44 AM, Kathy wrote:

It could certainly be a costly repair and probably not worth it for a ten year old appliance. I'd go for a new "no frills" washer which should be about $400
Those expensive machines with a lot of electronic controls ...in my opinion ...are a big waste of money
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replying to philo , Kathy wrote:

thanks!
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On 10/04/2015 11:44 AM, Kathy wrote:

You are welcome
FWIW: My Whirlpool has now gone close to 28 years without a single thing ever going wrong with it. My guess it that "they don't build them like that anymore."
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 4 Oct 2015 13:09:11 -0500, philo

My Kenmore, made by Whilrpool, has gone 36 years, but it did need a belt-tightening some time in the last 5 years.
That was not exactly hard but it wasn't as easy as I thought it would be. Had to get a pry-bar to push on the motor while I tightened the bolt that held it in place. Might have used the 14" jack handle iron from most GM cars in the 60's and 70's. But it didn't stick the first time or two. I'd have to start the basket spinning in the spin cycle. Partly because it too crowded behind the machine to be on my knees, so I had to sit with my legs folded. And partly I think because I'd really be better off with a new belt. Don't they stretch or glaze or something?
My dryer is also 36 years old and it stopped working for the first time 2 weeks ago. It's either the belt or the wheels the basket rests on. Makes a shrieking or grinding noise, iirc. Also I use the How Much Wetness cycle and it depnds on where the knob is whether it does anything or not. I don't remember that before. Even harder to work on because the basement is crowded and first I have to move the washer.
Had to dry my laundry all over the place last time, and it worked pretty well until I used three pairs of underpants and couldn't find anymore. I had to open my reserve package of brand new. Later found five pair on the shower rod.
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On 10/04/2015 05:16 PM, micky wrote:

I bought mine because it was belt-less
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 4 Oct 2015 18:08:27 -0500, philo

I don't know if they made that kind 36 years ago, but I didn't buy the washer anyhow. The guy I bought my house from picked it out. He didn't buy the most expensive, I think, but he didn't buy the cheapest either. I think he bought what I would have bought.
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On 10/05/2015 01:10 AM, micky wrote:

Good idea about the guy leaving the washer behind.
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On 10/4/2015 10:44 AM, Kathy wrote:

You can either buy a new machine or pay a serviceman $80 to tell you it will cost a bunch of money to fix it.
I'd go for a new one. I can see that being a repair costing 75% of a new machine and you still have a 10 year old machine that can break down for another reason.
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replying to Ed Pawlowski , Kathy wrote:

Thanks!
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 04 Oct 2015 16:44:01 +0000, Kathy

If you do get another one, offer this one free until you find someone who has the time to fix it. Freecycle or Craig's LIst if you say everything that is wrong with it, etc. or maybe an inner city appliance repairman, who will go to the trouble of combining two scrap machines and make one that works Who'll save this one until he gets the machine with matching parts. If someone like that doesn't want it, and he may not, you'll be positive if wasn't worth fixing.
Although when you buy a new one most times the delivery guy will take away the old one. What he does, I don't know.
OT, I took my stove, ruined by fire, to the city dump, and a guy at the entrance wanted it. He was waiting there for people like me. I guess either of them were going to make scrap metal out of it, but he actually wanted it and the dump just took it because they had to I had it on one of those trays that plug into a trailer hitch receiver, and he had a pickup truck.
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Depends on how old yer last machine is. I usta fix my own. Buy a manual and have at it.
OTOH, if you have a newer machine, maybe not. I notice many generic major appliance parts stores have gone by the wayside. I recall our's closed and when I went to the appliance store to inquire why, they told me the older parts were becoming unavailable and new appliances harder to repair. Whan I asked about my particular problem --bad thermostat/controller in newer model GE fridge-- they told me the tool to change the part cost more than the original refrigerator. These were the same guys that usta run the parts store. 8|
nb
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On Sun, 04 Oct 2015 14:44:01 +0000, Kathy

Are they lying? Doubt it. But they say "highly improbable."
http://www.moffatappliances.ca/faq/faq2.jsp#6 "6. I am getting oil on my clothes/floor. To minimize the possibility of electric shock, unplug this appliance from the power supply before attempting any maintenance or cleaning. Greasy or oily stains on clothes: • The 1995 and newer washer transmission design makes it highly improbable for oil from the transmission to get into washer and splatter on clothing. Most of the time it is caused by splatters from cooking oil. Stains from foods or cooking oils, sometimes called "invisible stains", may not be noticed as you put clothes in the washer. If not completely removed in the wash cycle, the oily spots may pick up dirt from wash water making the spots visible. The washer does not cause these spots.
To prevent: Wash garments as soon as practical after wearing, using more detergent than normal and the hottest wash water fabric can stand.
To correct: Rub in undiluted detergent, let stand 30 minutes and rewash, using hottest water fabric can stand.
• If your water is extremely hot, 150 degrees or higher, the water inlet hose(s) could start to break down, causing black greasy stains on clothes. Refer to the Use and Care Guide for your water heater, set the temperature accordingly, and replace the inlet hose(s). "
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On Sun, 04 Oct 2015 12:02:59 -0500, Vic Smith

Easy way to find out. Thoroughly clean the washer. Remove all signs of oily ring with a good greese cutting detergent (dawn dishwashing soap is a good example). Then get some clean old towels or other ultimately expendable fabric and run a cycle with a small amount of the greese-cutting detergent - then run the load again with clear water - look for any signs of oil on the drum. If none, run the load again with your normal detergent and check again.. If there is no oily deposit you are pretty safe to assume there is no oil leak in the washer.
If you are using a fabric softener, double check your "dosage" as too much WILL leave deposits.
Also check your laundry detergent and if your water is very hard, use washing soda or water conditioner like "calgon" to reduce or eliminate hard water scum.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 04 Oct 2015 12:02:59 -0500, Vic Smith

Very interesting. Definitely worth cleaning the oily ring off and running another load with different items.
Should never assume the worst about almost anything without retesting.

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On Sun, 04 Oct 2015 14:44:01 +0000, Kathy

Another possibility to look at. Fabric softener - this repairman says it's made of oil and has to be used correctly. It's not your machine, but might be relevant. http://www.justanswer.com/appliance/4mvr1-lg-wf-t506-washer-leaking-oil-staining-clothes.html#re.v/266/
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