Leak in spa heater


I've got an old Laars Telstar 50,000 BTU spa heater.
Just developed a leak in the heat exchanger. The leaks are real easy to see and they are not under much pressure. Just a couple of tiny sprays are shooting out.
The correct thing to do would be to buy a new heater ($650). The exchanger costs almost as much as a new heater ($500).
I'm thinking is such a small leak there might be an adhesive I could put on it to stop the leak. Anyone know of such a thing?
In case you don't know what a heat exchanger is:
Part number 47. Not sure what it's made of but I'm guessing bronze.
http://www.poolcenter.com/parts_heaters_laars_telstar.htm
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Master Betty wrote:

If it's copper and bronze, soldering it would be the best bet if you can reach the leak to do it.
You'd have to blow out all the water, and probably would need more than the standard propane torch.
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I used a standard soldering iron and solder and it did help. There is a small leak that I'm having trouble finding but I can live with a small leak. If I can just stretch it out for 3-4 months.
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wrote:

If it's old and has developed leaks, you are likely looking at replacement in the very near future even if you manage to fix the present leaks without creating new ones. Save yourself a lot of aggravation and useless work doing repairs that are at best temporary. Time to replace. There are more leaks waiting to spring up every time you look.
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On Jan 11, 5:55 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Could you use automotive radiator sealer?
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Could you use automotive radiator sealer?
++
I did think about that but there is no way to recirculation just in the heater. The sealer would end up in the spa.
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On Mon, 11 Jan 2010 16:03:03 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

My guess from the information given (Old Heater - spontaneous pinhole leaks appearing) is that this heat exchanger doesn't have much metal left in it. I really don't think it can be successfully repaired. It may even crack or crumble from being disasembled.
If he said it was 3 years old and he accidentally whacked it with an ax and it was leaking, then investigating a repair would be reasonable.
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LOL....I think it was put in in the 80s. The house was built 1983.
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wrote:

According to your link:
"Teledyne Laars TelStar TGS-50, TGT-50 heater mfg 1985-1999"
That makes it ten years old - minimum.
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After checking around I think I'm going to purchase another Laars. I called a pool/spa repair place and they confirmed they make a good pool heater
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Yeah...I know that's coming. It's just right atfer xmas when things get tight. I was hoping to squeeze a few more months.
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wrote:

Well you might at least get that lucky. If it's leaking now, you really don't have anything to lose if an attempted repair makes it worse.
A tube of J.B. Weld is only a few bucks.
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Master Betty wrote:

Mostl likely the entire thing is corroded and as you patch one leak, another will pop up soon after. If it is copper, it can be soldered. You can try taking it to a radiator shop and have it done right. Those guys are pros at working on thin wall stuff. Using epoxy type patches usually only lasts for a short time.
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I've seen toothpicks/matchsticks stay radiator leaks for good long whiles. 'Course you leave the cap loose, so there's no pressure.
Or, enlarge to where you might dip fine threaded screws in JB Weld, or silicone (or wrap 'em with Teflon tape), then run them in. -----
- gpsman
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