Leak in Shower


I have just moved into my new house about 3 months ago. We noticed a bit of mold on the side of the shower. The builder came and took down some gyprock. Behind the shower there is a black membrane. I found about 6 inches of water behind that membrane. When I say 6 inches I mean 6 inches high in water. The builder is trying to tell me that that is normal to have water in the membrane. I told him that having 6 inches of water after 3 months is beyond ridiculous. He thought the leak was coming from the shower door, I'm thinking its leaking through the grout in the shower. The entire shower is in ceramics.
Does anyone have experience with shower leaks ? Does anyone know if the membrane is suppose to have water in it ? I thought the membrane was for if the shower leaks it will catch it. Not to actually collect water regularly.
Any info would help. Tks.
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No, there should be no water there. Your contractor is jerking you off (they tend to do this).
Look very closely (I mean very closely) at the grout joints!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Your absolutely correct in telling the builder that it is beyond ridiculous. As a home improvement contractor, I have never seen 6" of water in any shower liner in 35+ yrs.
If you see no cracks in the grout, then I would have to supect the shower diverter or the shower head pipe connection. If you can remove the access panel to the diverter, you should be able to check for leaks. Water being in the pan/liner tells me that the water source is at a higher elevation (diverter?).
-Lee
~~ ~ ~_/) ~~ ~~ -|_ee
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Grout is not waterproof - water goes through it. It is supposed to then "flow" through the backerboard behind the tile down into the shower pan concrete, where it continues down to the weep holes at the drain. Normally, this should be small amounts of water. The amount you are seeing suggests to me either no path to the weep holes, or a significant leak of water somewhere.
You can reduce water through the grout by sealing the grout, but water will still get through it in small amounts.
If you have gyprock behind the tile in a shower, you have a problem. Normally, concrete backerboard or some such material is used. Normal drywall, or even "greenboard" won't hold up to the moisture in a shower.
Bob
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For what it's worth, I had a somewhat similar situation. My cause was a pinhole leak in the water supply lines ... copper. But this was after several years in the house.

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It's definitely not the water lines. The builder took a piece of gyprock off the back and we can see the plastic pipes everywhere. I turned the shower on and the spray was directly on the ceramic flooring. Within 1 minute there was a substantial water building up between the black member and the durock sheets. That would seem the me the grout is leaking water. What I don't understand is the water leaves within 10 minutes, so its all going somewhere but I don't know where. Our showre is over our garage, so I'm thinking to cut a hole in the garage gyprock to see if there is water pooled up in the vapour barrier
Buster Chops wrote:

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Grout leaks. Is there a problem?
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hi David,
Remove the screen over the drain and inspect the area around the flange. I don't know what type of drain that you have. Some have the screen inside of the flange and others snap over it. If the screen covers the flange, then you should be able to see if the seal is tight around the flange. If it is loose, see if you can turn it. If it does turn, you can remove it and see what the base of the shower is made of and how thick it is. You normally can not turn and it should have a tight seal of grout/thinset and concrete around it. The turning part of the drain is used to set the height of the tile with the concrete The liner is attached to the drain under this element of the drain. There should be slots or weep holes into the drain that your water exists into the drain pipe.
-Lee
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Again run garden hose DIRECTLY into drain area. if leak appears you now know its source.
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In my shower-fiberglass-any leakage between the sections is directed back into the shower pan. I was initially concerned about seam leakage and called the manufacturer. I was told "not to seal" the seams. Could do this at the time since the back of the walls were exposed. Having said all this--is it possible that your missing water is finding its way back to the shower pan? MLD

6
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I have a similar problem with my shower stall too. When I leave the water running without stepping into the stall, the water does not leak into the floor downstairs. However if someone (of normal weight) steps into the stall and turns the shower on, the water leaks into the floor below. I thought it was a grout issue and had the grout work on the ceramic tiles redone, but it has not solved the problem. I have called a pumber to figure out what to do. I will let you know how we solved the problem .
Cheers, GoaDude
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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