Lead Poisoning

Page 1 of 2  
Apparently there is are a large number of problems with lead poisoning about, especially in children. The worst part is that because lead can't really be noticed by the senses you may not even know that it is there. A large portion of this is as a result of lead paint that is still in older houses which people might not even be aware of. If you take a look at http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/case/lead_poisoning there is a lot of information on the sources, effects, treatments and more of lead poisoning. There is also a free case evaluation that may be of interest. I hope this might be of help to some.
kr0
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This really makes me wonder, when I was growing up all the piping in our house was lead piping . I seemed to have little if any effect on our generation. mjh

poisoning.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mike hide wrote:

How the heck old <are> you anyway???? :)
And where was lead piping still widely being used recently?
Lead in solder, some in leaded cast iron fittings (virtually all in waste, not potable water), other trace fittings here and there, but full-blown lead pipe for potable water???!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In Massachusetts (where the lead paint laws are strictes especially for multi-family's) You can take a class and do much of the work yourself. Once you have the place inspected (and get into a database where you are FORCED to comply within 2 years of the inspection date and can't sell your house until you comply) you can take a training class and become certified for moderate risk deleading. http://www.mass.gov/dph/clppp/trainpro.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

Lead has been used as the service line (lateral) from curb to house, coast-to-coast for a long, long time and most of those original lines are still in service. Lead was used because it is flexible and does not corrode. Only the availability of soft copper tubing in the late 1930's supplanted lead use.
Every water dep't has some type of plan in place to monitor lead levels at residences as a result of these lead lines. In *most* cases there is little cause for alarm. Some cities are voluntarily replacing the *city-owned* portion of these lines, which means usually from street main to curb. The homeowner is left with replacing the major section.
The water utilities add chemicals to the water (where needed) which form a protective coating inside the lead pipe (you can see it). This greatly reduces the leaching out of lead.
http://www.louisvillewater.com/water_quality/lead-info-sheet.htm is a very typical statement from a utility.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My last house was built in 1948. When I sold it in 1981 it still had the original lead service line; as did many hundreds more in the area. The rest of the house was copper. I've never seen lead in the house, but many older houses had galvanized pipe.
I also lived in two other houses with lead paint. It was a very good quality paint because of the lead. No one ever got sick from it, nor did we ever chew on the painted surfaces. I realize there can be bad consequences, but , IMO, the potential hazard is over rated. DIY cleanup is no big deal if you take a few precautions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Speedy Jim wrote:

...
I'll be d---d! Never heard of it. Perhaps since never had to deal w/ really old city water systems. Everything out here that I'm aware of was galvanized. I'll have to ask the City Engineer if there're any lead laterals in town...
Was it really nearly pure lead or an alloy?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

I have to say nearly pure. Very soft and flexible and it will rub off on your skin. The trick to making it safe all these years has been the coating deposited on the inside.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Speedy Jim wrote:

...
....
Ah so...obvious solution and understandable reason why will eventually become a problem...thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, Just because his water service pipe may have been made of lead DOESN'T mean that he WAS poisoned.
As other posters have mentioned, lead water service piping naturally coats over with minerals. That reduces most of the lead leaching out of it into the water.
Tests have shown that simply flushing a toilet once or twice in the morning before drinking water is drawn from a tap reduces the free lead in the water to virtually nil.
The same is true for the lead soldered joints that were used until recently. The joints coat over with minerals, greatly reducing the lead that leaches into the water.
The main hazard form lead in homes is paint dust from lead bearing paints. The major source of that is paint dust scraped off window frames due to the action of simply opening/closing windows. Peeling paint is another obvious source of lead dust.
I'm a landlord and have attended many lead seminars given by local and regional heath departments.
The main worry is exposing children under the age of 5 to lead. It can affect brain development.
Unless the exposure is extremely high, there is relatively little risk to adults.
I've worked with lead based solder, mainly in electronics but also in pumbing since I was 15 years old. I recently had my blood lead level tested after over 30 years of working with lead. My blood lead level came in at 1/10th the hazardous amount.
Ironically, in my city, the cases of lead poisoning in children has dropped by over 75% in the last ten years. However, only 10% of the inner city housing has gone through lead abatement/removal.
The reason why the lead posoning cases have dropped is thru not due to the removal of the lead. It has been due to more publicity, better house keeping and more parental awareness of the hazards (keeping lead paint chips out of the mouths of children, etc).
Doug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The fact of whether just his service was lead or ALL his pipes were lead is not the point.
The point is that lead pipes become lined with mineral deposits, greatly reducing the amount of lead that leaches into the water. As mentioned, laboratory tests have shown that a simple flushing of the toilet before drinking tap water serves to drop the lead in the water moving thru such pipes to a negligible level.
Doug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

is
The lead pipes I mentioned were in a house probably built in the late 1930s in the UK . House construction there is [or was quite different then] double brick construction with a 4" airspace between. The inside walls were plastered . The pipes that ran to the house were lead and so were the pipes [running inside the walls were also lead ] As a matter of fact I remember several times during harsh winters the pipes would burst and the plumber had to tear the wall apart to make the repair, sweating in the repair and smoothing it out with a moleskin, never did quite understand that part ....mjh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
h if 10 percent of housing was deleaded and 75 percent of children have lower lead levels then it was not all to do with paint.
Lead was removed in 78 from paint. But it was also removed from food cans and gasoline. That is when the levels started to fall.
Oddly the paint companies and gasoline companies have escaped liability. Could it be because the govt told them to add lead and then said to take it out? Kinda like MTBE today in the gasoline that is polluting our wells?
The solution is a cleanliness campaign to educate everyone how to keep a clean household.
FWIW - highest lead levels are found on a window sill. Highest month for lead is August. This all points to the outside. And if one builds a new home there should not be any lead at all right? Wrong - there will be lead levels detected on window sills.
Some ways to reduce lead levels... eat more veggies, use dust mats in homes, do not allow pets outside as they drag it back in and raise lead levels, remove shoes when entering a house. Japan has lots of lead around them YET they have no lead poisoning due to their cleanliness.
Remember that lead is also in yellow plastic, lipstick, baby powder, hair dyes, candles... and probably grandma's house.
This policy is overblown in Massachusetts. Could this be the reason why its not a national program as other states question this state?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
oreo123 wrote: ...

But in what form? There has to be an exposure pathway and a chemical form that promotes retention for there to be a problem...
Not to say there can't be a problem, but to say there's always a problem is just as inaccurate...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Romans were using lead salts as a sweetener. That allowed it to be absorbed in their bodies. That probably contributed a lot more lead than the water supply plumbing.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the wine sweetener got its lead content from being prepared in a lead pot http://itsa.ucsf.edu/~snlrc/encyclopaedia_romana/wine/leadpoisoning.html "A more probable cause of lead poisoning in ancient Rome was the consumption of defrutum or sapa. Cato, Columella, and Pliny all describe how unfermented grape juice (mustum, must) was boiled to concentrate its sugar. "A product of art, not of nature," says Pliny (XIV.80), the must was reduced to one half (defrutum) or even one third its volume (sapa), and the thickened syrup used to sweeten and preserve wine and fruit. The question is whether the must was boiled in pots of lead or bronze. In De Agri Cultura, the earliest example of Latin prose (c.160 BC), Cato gives directions for reducing must in "a copper or lead vessel" over a slow fire..."
as to which "contributed a lot more lead" "Scholars have reported that Roman food, water and wine all contained excessive amounts of lead." http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/product.biblio.jsp?osti_id "6840
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As far as I know the roman "plumbing" generally used wooden pipes. They are uneathing wooden roman pipes in city of London all the time ....mjh
wrote:

poisoned,
the
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

from same link posted elsewhere in this thread http://itsa.ucsf.edu/~snlrc/encyclopaedia_romana/wine/leadpoisoning.html
"...Vitruvius, who wrote during the time of Augustus, indicates that the Romans knew of the danger of lead pipes...Abundant, easily malleable, and with a low melting point, lead (plumbum) was ideal for the production of water pipes, which were fabricated by plumbarii (plumbers) in a variety of diameters from rolled sheets and fitted together (Vitruvius, VIII.6.1ff). Such pipes were extensively used but known to be a potential source of soluble lead."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.