Leach field replacement


I need to get a leach field replaced. The old one was put over caliche, and not dug very deep. It was made with minimal amounts of gravel, no more than 12" around the pipes. When checked with a laser, it was not level by a long shot.
The new field will require caliche removal but not a lot, and I anticipate four days labor based on my construction experience. The contractor will supply pipes, covering, and gravel. How much would a leach field for a three bedroom three bath house cost in your area. Just a guess would be fine. Actual prices if you have had it done.
Tire kickers, ankle biters, and those who have no direct experience or knowledge are kindly asked to sit this one out.
Steve
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On Mon, 1 Mar 2010 22:14:51 -0800, "Steve B"

"caliche removal" is the most costly? Say it ain't so.
County here required a deep enough field, that you could bury dozens of bodies under the turf. I think John paid sum thousands of dollars.
All inspected of course ;)
I know in rural Las Vegas they WILL be there to INSPECT!
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On 3/2/2010 1:14 AM, Steve B wrote:

Size of field generally depends on perk test along with size of house. Vacant lots around here will have bedroom restrictions if perk is minimal.
I have a switcher box where I alternate between fields as they can saturate and rain appears to regenerate when alternate field is in use. In fact, today, in this area you need alternate field installed with new house with septic.
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Steve B wrote:

Central Florida, "soil" is sand
1000 gallon tank + leach field...1 line IIRC, about 75' long
Backhoe and operator + two men, half day
$1500, 1995
Adjust for inflation to under $2500 now
--

dadiOH
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wrote:

Until you hit sandstone cap-rock. Easy to break, but not like caliche.
You find more cap rock in South Florida, think coral rock.
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What kind of soil is caliche?
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wrote:

You could Google it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caliche_%28mineral%29
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wrote:

What kind of soil is caliche?
reply: I think it is Spanish for concrete.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

Wiki and other references seem to agree, it is a concrete made of calcium carbonate with any variety of aggregates such as sand, pebbles, etc. I would expect an excavator or bobcat with a hydraulic breaker and suitable point could deal with it reasonably well.
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wrote:

I can tell you have never worked with caliche.
Steve
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On Tue, 2 Mar 2010 21:12:16 -0800, "Steve B"

I would describe caliche (' round here) as "hard as a preacher's dick". A bobcat can't scratch the surface.
It was days I could hear a " hydraulic breaker" pounding, just blocks away. They were making way for a mini-mini mall.
Moving part of a mountain another place - dynamite!! Home owners sued (Hendertuckystain, NV).
Install a new pool and the price may double, just from having caliche.
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In the Sixties, it was referred to as "Hooterville" by the locals. Grew up in Pittman, originally called Jericho heights in the thirties and forties. The area of the Skyline and Joker's Wild casinos. Henderson was the old Henderson, and did not include what is now Green Valley.
I used to ride dirt bikes where Green Valley is today. The old Clinger ranch. Paradise Valley Golf course when there were about seven houses scattered around the fringe, Rovaun owning one of them. Light years ago and a planet away.
Steve
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On Wed, 3 Mar 2010 22:22:06 -0800, "Steve B"

Green Valley has crept on me. 215/Eastern/Windmill.

Heck I have a coupon for a T-Bone dinner in GV. (real steak house)
Fact remains "caliche" is a tough job ;-/
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Paradise Valley Golf course when there were about seven houses

Sorry, Google Rouvaun, extra "u" there. Originally from Utah. I thought he was French. Interesting read of Las Vegas history.
Steve
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Whee are you located? Here in the Chicago suburbs would be a lot different from the middle of a Kansas farmfield.
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On 3/2/2010 12:14 AM, Steve B wrote:

Don't know about replacement but from scratch with 1,000 gallon tank I would figure about $1,900 to $2,400 but that is in the "boonies" of SE Iowa.
Don
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"Steve B" wrote

Mom had to have one redone for a 3 BR, 2 bath house back in 1976. I don't know anything about 'caliche' or if it was involved.

I remember she wasn't happy with the price but multiple estimates all came in pretty close. It was about 3,500$ but there was some sort of something special that was 'wrong' which raised the price quite a bit. 'Calaiche' possibly? Thinking. Oh yeah, I forget the name of it but that big cement 'box' that you have to have dumped every now and again (like every 20 years I think) had developed a crack and had to be repaired as well. That was probably a good bit of why the total was as high as it was. A huge crack along the side all the way to the bottom that was letting clay mud in when the ground was saturated which also filled the leach field.
I'm sorry but I dont recall if they had to replace that 'box' or were able to just replace or fix that wall. My clearest memory was of mud and 'stuff' suddenly coming up through the bathtub and shower drains in a heavy rain situation and not being able to flush any toilets plus sinks wouldnt drain. Pretty sure we didnt know anything was wrong before that suddenly happened.

Grin, best I can do for you Steve. I've been on city sewer since those days.
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NC has clay about like caliche but you also find big rocks in it too. About 5 years ago when my friend had his new home built it cost about $8000. They tried going around the rocks at first but only ran into a new rock every time so that started digging them up. A few of them took a half a day to get out of the ground. While he wasn't happy with the cost he admitted it should have cost more. he figured both he and the contractor lost money on this one.
Jimmie
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wrote:

NC has clay about like caliche but you also find big rocks in it too. About 5 years ago when my friend had his new home built it cost about $8000. They tried going around the rocks at first but only ran into a new rock every time so that started digging them up. A few of them took a half a day to get out of the ground. While he wasn't happy with the cost he admitted it should have cost more. he figured both he and the contractor lost money on this one.
Jimmie
Very close to my situation. Ended up taking two weeks of a few hours here and there, a lot of it consulting with other contractors and the blaster. Ended up using 97 tons of gravel. New pipes with "inspection ports" so if it does fill up like a bathtub, I can pump it. In the meantime, I can monitor fluid levels and keep ahead of it and know before it reaches danger levels. I personally don't think it will be a problem. We also put a drain on one end that is slightly above grade so that if it ever gets full, it will run down into another secondary leach field. It's nice to live in the middle of nowhere and can do things using logic and common sense and not have to fool with the educated over capacity crowd.
Steve
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