Lawnmower; Putting Away For the Winter ?

Page 1 of 2  

Hi,
Question regarding "winterizing" and putting away a lawnmower for the winter:
Not sure which is best, (a) or (b) or... ?
(a) Put some Staboil in the tank, run for a few minutes so that some of the Staboil treated gas hopefully makes it into the Carb. and shut off. That's it.
(b) run the tank dry, forget any Staboil. I read with this approach some of the seals in the Carb., etc., might dry out, and that this isn't the best approach. But some say running dry is the best.
Any thoughts would be most appreciated.
Thanks, B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do B you know the carb wont be gummed up I think seals are better material then what was used pre 70-80s, leaks will stop , a carb rebuild is a headache.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

I've done both, actually those 2 plus the 3rd ... just leave the gas were it it. Maybe it's just me, but every time I've use Stabil, I find the engine very hard to start in the spring, so I avoid it. However, I will probably put it in my motor home tank as it will not be going on any long trips for the foreseeable future (probably springtime). As for the small engines, I usually run it dry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

Gasoline SHOULD remain stable for a year or more without additives.
If the remaining gas evaporates completely, well, that's a different story....
Perhaps one should fill the tank completely before putting the mower away for the winter. Doing so will minimize moisture from the air condensing into water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wonder why my Echo manual says dont leave gas in more than maybe 3-6 months, in a year it will even smell bad but it has evaporated a bit and done damage long before a year
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ransley wrote: ...

CT(heir)A, of course...
Have had this discussion several times over last several months.
I've never had any issues in simply closing feed valve to carb and running carb dry and using fresh fuel in the carb for starting the following spring in something approaching 50 years. Add in the previous 50 or so of dad's experience (still using a couple of those mowers that are 40+), there's little reason ime to get particularly concerned over such relatively short time periods.
I'll agree the little 2-cycle beasties on trimmers/chainsaws/etc. are more touchy but still less than a year is essentially overnight in my book. I don't use the chainsaw often for at least that long and it always starts and runs and it's probably pushing 40 now as well (which indicates how infrequently one needs a chainsaw in SW KS).
I just finished this spring putting an old small tiller back into service that hadn't been run since we moved back from TN 10 years ago. It hadn't had anything done to it when last used there and was simply unloaded and stuck in a shed here when we arrived. The fuel left was terribly gunky of course, but while I was concerned there could be some trouble w/ the carb so pulled it off expecting it to be gummed up it wasn't. A shot of carb cleaner thru it, rinse the tank and a clean plug and it started and ran. Again, observation seems to counter the seriousness of the proverbial worry over the issue.
$0.02, etc., etc., etc., ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In the real world, today's gasoline does not stand up terribly well in an "open" container. In my chain saw, gas stays good for 2 or more years. In my snow blower or lawn mower, 6 months is stretching it.
Using premium fuel without ethanol gives you an advantage too. Shell Ultra has no ethanol.
The chain saw tank is "sealed" and the mower and blower tanks are "vented".

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is your chainsaw a 2 cycle where you mix in oil ? I have bought some 2 cycle oil that states it has something like Staboil in it.
I found out that not all gas that has ethanol in has to be labled as such. I think they can have a certain percentage without the lable.
I agree that filling the tank full will help with the moisuer problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 7 Sep 2009 20:00:04 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

It is a 2 stroke, and the oil does not have any kind of stabilizer in it.

In ontario they must say "may contain up to X% ethanol" or they may not have ethanol in it. Shell is on record as stating they will NOT put ethanol in their Ultra.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hmm. I've noticed my mower tank being bone dry on occasion, like after it took 6 weeks off during the drought this summer. (Too bad I've had to mow every six effing days since then, but I digress...) Serious question- after the final time of mulching the leaves this fall, should I top off tank, and also put a plastic bag under the cap, and turn the fuel line switch off, like I do when I turn it over to change blades or clean the deck? Will that slow down the water-in-the-gas and evaporation problems? In the four years I have owned this thing (generic MTD with Honda engine), I basically have just been shoving it in the shed. It always starts in spring, once I blow the mice nests out, but I usually change the oil and plug to get it running smoother.
-- aem, who was supposed to change the oil and plug in the snow blower this weekend, sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I leave the gas valve on so the gas will run into the carberator. That is where the problems usually hapen. There are a couple of very small holes internal to it and that is what usually gets plugged up. Filling up the gas tank will help with the water problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph Mowery wrote:

With the gas shut off, why not run the mower until the carburetor is empty?
Briggs & Stratton recommends running a mower out of gas if it will be stored where the temperature is pretty steady, such as in a cellar. It recommends a full tank and Stabil if the temperature will fluctuate.
That sounds right to me. Suppose it's left with half a tank in a location where the tank will warm 20F each day and the night air is humid. The vapor pressure of the gas will drop a lot at night, pulling in moist air, and the gasoline will absorb moisture, which will end up on the bottom. During the day, the increased vapor pressure will drive out a lot of air, so more will be sucked in when it cools. I haven't had trouble in my garage, but significant water could accumulate.
How about running a mower out of gas, then leaving it in the sun for a few hours with the cap off the tank so that any remaining gas will dry up and blow away? A completely empty tank shouldn't pump much air in and out, and there will be no gas to absorb water vapor.
Letting a mower battery sit all winter without charging will probably shorten its life. If much grass is left under the deck, corrosion could shorten its life.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
E Z Peaces wrote:

-----------------------
over the years I have pretty much developed this method...
run dry, put gas cap back on but loose... remove spark plug and spray some wd40 into the cylinder, pull cord a few times to distribute the oil, then replace spark plug.
paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ouch! WD-40? Is that really what you meant to say? Or a type? That's not oil, it evaporates rather quickly, and cleans the metal well enough to allow it to rust, including valve surfaces when you turn the engine over. . Plain old 30W oil will do a lot better or if you're concerned it's not burnable, use the kind you mix with gas. But WD-40, well, you're hastening the wear internally. It's definitely not a recommended thing to use.
HTH,
Twayne`
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

    Take your choice. I have used both ways and (c). C= Do nothing. I have never had a problem.
    As for seals, consider that left over lawn mowers that have never had gas in them will be sold as new next year.
    Abouth the only really bad way is to let the gasoline evaporate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 7, 8:15am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Even if you run it dry, many carbs have bowels that will not be empty unless you drain it directly via the drain fitting. I always go with adding the stabilizer directly to the last can of gasoline when I bring it home. That way the stabilizer is in the mower whenever the last time you cut it is, which depends on the weather.
I'd also suggest RTFM, which usually tells you what the manufacturer recommends.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

(c) put lawnmower away. take out once a month, start it up and let it warm up, put away again. That's all I do, never have any trouble.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Blocker wrote:

(d) let run until it's nearly dry and spray carburetor cleaner into gas tank and run until it sputters. Much less work that running each engine once/month. I do that each year and I've never had a problem.
I gummed up a carburetor on a snow blower by leaving some gas, without any stabilizer, in the tank over the summer. Actually, what really killed the carburetor was my attempt to take apart the carburetor and clean it out. I was utterly clueless how to fix it and it was too big to bring to the shop. I sold the house and left the owners with the snow-blower. I told them that the carburetor needed to be fixed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<SNIP> In my case, the snow around the shed would be a pain in the neck to get out of the way, especially if it's frozen. MLD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John wrote:

Evaporation from carburetor even with Stabil in the gas can gum it up. Happened to me this past winter with snow thrower. Also reading manual, it said not to use gas with alcohol in it. I think it works OK but when gas with alcohol starts to evaporate, alcohol concentration increases making it more susceptible to attack seals. If you do leave gas in it, start it up every now and then to bring fresh gas into carburetor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.