Lawn mower problem - possibly electrical

Spring is around the corner - so decided to tend on my mower. Last mowing season, a branch got stuck and burnt a wire. I replaced the wire, the voltage regulator. The mower starts and runs for about 20 minutes, before dying on me. Then it will not start up because the battery goes dead. I charge up the battery, mower starts up pretty good - runs for 20 mins and battery is dead !! First question is, does these mowers have charging system? Does it seem like the charging system is bad? Or do you think there is an electrical short? If I need to look for a short, where should I start?
Mower is a Toro with 11HP Brigs. Battery is brand spanking new.
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On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 00:02:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (nsaikia) wrote:

If it has a battery, it has to have a charging system. Otherwise, the battery will go dead after 20 minutes.

No, it's not bad. It may do bad things, but it needs to be gently rebuked. It may also have a problem that has to be fixed.

If there were a short, the battery would go dead while the mower was parked, or it would spark all over the place, or it would go dead in a lot less than 20 minutes. No reason to suspect a short.

You need to find out some details of the charging system.
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You say you replaced the regulator, well that controls charge. Start there with a volt meter.
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Ok. From what I gather from the reply so far, it is not a short. It seems the charging system is broke somewhere. I replaced the regulator with an automotive one, as I could not find a lawn mower one handy. I will start there again to check.
I am looking for information on the charging system of a Briggs and Stratton (I do not know if it will be any different when installed on a Toro). I do not know if getting one of the Briggs repair manual will help me on that. Can you guys point me to the right direction?
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You put a Automobile voltage regulator on a Briggs & Stratton and are here asking why the battery is dead! Start with the right regulator, im sure you will be happy.
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m Ransley wrote:

In the words of Bart Simpson, Aye Karoomba! Even he wouldn't be dumb enough to do this. What's next, putting the blade on the car?
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On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 15:04:19 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (nsaikia) wrote:

I didn't notice this until M.R. pointed it out (I read automotive as "automatic"! :)
The output of that regualator is meant to be the same 13.x volts DC, but the anticipated input is very different. The car it is meant for has an alternator, but your lawnmower doesn't, does it? (I don't know much about big lawn mowers. Do they have generators instead of alternators, or some third thing?)

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The B&S in that range ive seen have no generator just a rotor and stator, which might be the real issue. I might guess the car regulator could have to high a minimum amp input need and not open.
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Now guys ! Go easy on me ! I am not a professional and I accept my mistake (if it is indeed one). I thought that a 12V regulator is a 12V regulator and so should not make a difference.
I will get a proper regulator and try it on. Will post back with results.
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nsaikia wrote:

Without a engine model # I can't say with 100% certainty, but most Briggs do have a diode in the charging circuit to prevent the battery from discharging back through the alternator.
MikeB
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It has a rotor -stater , no generator- alternator right, start with seeing if it is outputting electricity. and what V.
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I got the regulator from Autozone. Suppose to be for an older GM car.
Also, where is the charging system on a Briggs? Is it in-built - like in the flywheel? Where would be the diode that you are talking about?
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nsaikia wrote:

The diode is usually in the wiring harness & the coil is usually under the flywheel.
MikeB
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nsaikia wrote:

Yeah, it is a coil mounted around the flywheel.
You can go to the B&S Site and get an illustrated parts listing:
http://www.briggsandstratton.com/display/router.asp?DocIDd103
If you have your engine number. (It will read something like 234432-0235). That model, engine type number will probably give you and idea of what you are looking at.
Click on Owners Manual - Parts list
Under Illustrated Parts list click on "Engine IPL"
In the left hand column click on "Engine IPLs"
Now enter the Model number (such as the 234432 above) and then the Engine type (such as the 0235 above).
Then you should have an option of downloading a IPL Form into a PDF file.
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