Lawn care goes hi-tech

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HeyBub wrote:

No, they are life-saving for those who want to change. As a nurse, I worked in a detox/treatment center, back in the day when small towns' worst drug was marijuana. Had one patient that I recall used coke, and was a dealer. Had a local judge who gave folks with DUI's the choice between jail and rehab...there wasn't a heck of a lot of difference, other than the jail cell being locked. I'm sure there were loads of people who relapsed, but there were those who woke up and took the chance to change before they lost everything.
Most of the staff were recovering people, so it was pretty hard to BS them. One old Marine explained why so many people are on skid row, his theory being that they had nothing (more) to lose and knew what to expect each day.
The amazing discovery made by a lot of folks in recovery was that their troubles were not much different than those of other people drinking to cover up whatever. I guesstimate that 90% had history of pretty serious abuse as children and the other 10% probably couldn't bring themselves to speak of it yet. Pretty horrific experiences for many, and some started drinking/using at about age 8, although 12-14 was most common.

Lots of folks become institutionalized...can't/won't function where they must take some responsibility for themselves. Unfortunately, they usually reproduce.

Virtually all? You have got to be kidding...changed drugs, maybe.

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-snip-
I went out googling to show Heybub how wrong he was-- and damned if he aint right again.<g>
I was a Marine in VN in 1969 & 70 and never saw heroin or opium. Saw lots of kick-ass pot and an amphetamine called 'Obesital'.
But I guess I wasn't far enough in the rear- or far enough south- or was the wrong color green; http://www.bookrags.com/research/vietnam-follow-up-study-edaa-03 / [regarding a study of soldiers returning from VN in 1971] "Almost half (43%) of the army enlisted men had used heroin or opium in Vietnam, and 20 percent had been addicted to narcotics there. Second, only a tiny proportion (12%) of those addicted in Vietnam became readdicted in the year after return (Robins et al., 1974). Follow-up again two years later showed that this low rate of readdiction continued (Robins et al., 1980)."
I don't think many programs can boast an 88% success rate long term.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

2.6 million served there, so, using your numbers, about 1,118,000 used heroin or opium. If 20% of those were addicted, the number is 223,000 or thereabouts. I don't for a minute believe that only 20% of heroin/opiate users became addicted OR that only 12% were "readdicted" (whatever that is) in the year after their return. Half probably lied to whomever did the study, and most addicts don't even admit addiction to themselves. Then one considers the addicts who merely change chemicals when supplies aren't available. Amazing numbers of bad backs are cured when addicts are in recovery; a few discover when they are sober that they have a bad back, not noticed prior because they self-medicated :o)
Wonder how drug use affects PTSD rates...either more mellow or dead? Iraq is not Viet Nam, but a heck of a lot of vets are coming back with loads of trouble.
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-snip-
Note that these were all Army- and in 1971. a skewed sample during the height of drug use- and when troop levels were 1/2 of what they were a couple years before.

The' readdicted' thing is because they wouldn't let you leave if you tested positive for opiates. So presumably when you left, you were clean.

I don't doubt that--but I'd be interested in seeing another study. Idle speculation has its place, but I like a fact or two thrown in now and then.
-snip-

Depends on the drug of choice. Sometimes it is just working 100 hours a week- so a heart attack gets you early.

I think that we'll see 10 times the amount of PTSD in Iraq vets over the next decade. We served a year, sometimes 2, and rarely 3 in Vietnam. [3rd tours were only on approval of a shrink when I was there] We were younger and less likely to be wanting to make the military a career. Some of these *moms* and *dads* have served 4 tours- with just enough time between to get them 1/2way back to peacetime mode.
When they've been back in country for a couple years is when they'll relax enough to get bit in the ass by PTSD. I recommend that every vet and spouse of a vet, and anyone who cares about them read Patience Mason's 'Recovering From the War'. The Vietnam references might be dated- but the principles of the disorder & its treatment don't change.
Jim
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wrote:

All federal prisons have voluntary AA & NA Programs. Outside volunteers manage the meetings. There is also random urine testing. Years ago the "Furlough" policy was changed. The inmate signed to "rules". One rule was not to eat poppy seeds. Seems they gave a false positive. Even staff are subject to drug testing...
On extended parole supervision (for years) they are subject to urine testing.
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JimT wrote:

Well, yeah, not sending as many crooks to prison might lower the cost per inmate, but don't forget the economies of scale!
If we got down to, say, only ONE inmate in prison, the cost per inmate would be astronomical. For example, you'd need, say, five full-time guards (at, oh, $60,000 each per year), a building, utilities, food, etc. The cost per inmate could easily reach a half-million per year.
On the other hand, if you have 200,000 prisoners already, adding one more can be had for pennies.
In other words, to lower the cost per inmate, we need to INCREASE the number of prisoners, not reduce it.
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_National Institute of Corrections_ has for many years (decades) been ran and managed by top officials, federal and state retirees / consultants. All with a Corrections background.
More on the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP)*
And. Remember many TX state prisoners are held (contract) by the federals.
Tax dollars at work.
Weekly Population Report
Total Federal Inmates: 211,253 (Last updated on April 22, 2010 )
The weekly population report is generated every Thursday at 12:00 a.m.
http://www.bop.gov/locations/weekly_report.jsp
The fed population, 30 years ago was 50,000
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For some reason, that statement made me think of that Prison Warden in the movie "Shawshank Redemption". I wonder how many prison wardens in Texas are making a few extra bucks off the free labor of their prisoners.

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hibb wrote:

Could be. But prisoners don't work outside the prison. For example, the Little Rabbit School District sends a school bus to Texas Correctional Industries (TCI) to be refurbished. TCI puts in a new engine, rebuilds the cab, straightens the frame, and so on, then sends the bus back. The school district is charged the cost of refurbishment.
Some inmates buy craft materials and produce things from pot holders to hand-crafted boots which are sold at the prison store to visitors. The money goes into the prisoner's account (there may be a small commission).
I don't think prison labor is hired out. And even if it were, the prisoners would much rather be winnowing someone's wheat than sitting in a cell all day.
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HeyBub wrote:

Sounds like maybe they have cleaned up their act a little. First half of 20th century or so, and probably back in the 19th as well, it was routine to rent out prisoners as field labor. Some counties were known to arrest transients on trumped-up charges and have a make-believe trial, when they were short a few bodies. The plantation mentality died real hard in some places. If you were poor and barely literate (and usually black), in those pre-Miranda day, if you got busted, well, not a whole lot you could do about it.
Don't get me wrong, I think prisoner work programs can be a Real Good Thing, if everything is done on the up-and-up, and the prisoner gets some OJT in salable skills, and maybe a better attitude. But from what I have read over the years, some of the programs in the old days were little more than thinly-disguised slavery.
-- aem sends...
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I agree but it did tick me off a bit when I lost a good contract with the local city to a prison labor program from a neighboring county. I had the contract for years and they made damn sure I didn't hire any ex-cons to work in the police department and then they let me go and hire convicts.
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On 04/23/10 04:10 pm, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Or there will be many more people on welfare because they can't get drivers' licenses to get to that job that doesn't require a great deal of knowledge of English.
Perce
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All the road signs are in English. Anybody who can't read them shouldn't be on the road.
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wrote:

I can drive in Mexico with little difficulty.
http://www.ontheroadin.com/Mexico%20Highway%20Road%20Signs_files/image001.jpg
Same for them, I'm sure.
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JimT wrote:

On the men working sign, is the man wearing a sombrero?
TDD
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wrote:

I think the guy on the horse does too. Yeah.....they'd never be able to understand; wrong hat.
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I doubt it, actually. The majority of the road signs in the United States consist of English text only, without the international pictorial symbols. Drivers who can't read English text are sure to be confused when driving in most parts of the U.S.
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I don't. The more important signs are stop, yield and stop lights. Those are the same. It's always dangerous if you don't know where you're going.
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wrote:

No Left Turn Lane Ends 500 Feet Do Not Enter Wrong Way Right Lane Must Turn Right School Zone Speed Limit 25mph etc.
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