LAWN CARE

Hello,
does anybody have a schedule of when and what to put on my lawn throughout the year. I live in Southern Ontario, Canada. I had a professional do it but I bet it isn't difficult at all to do myself. Most concerned with fertilization, weed and pest control.
many thanks !!!
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Forza Azzurri wrote:

Here's a link to the Scotts annual program. You'll have to enter a zip code for your area. You can probably use other similar products than Scotts. http://tinyurl.com/68osw
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willshak wrote:

I don't know what Scotts will suggest, but I am going to guess their schedule will be customized to fit their products. Often the recommended materials include things like weed and feed that are almost always not good to put down at the same time.
Scotts may be fine, but I would look to a local garden center (you may want to shop for one which has a well informed staff) and get your advice from them, or maybe here from someone in your area.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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If you're not willing to do the sensible thing, which is just mow it, let it grow what it wants, and pull out anything you don't like, then you should get an actual soil test kit, test your dirt, and go from there.
--Goedjn
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Personally, I wouldn't take advice from anyone who refers to soil as "dirt."
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snipped-for-privacy@uri.edu wrote:

This is some of the most foolish advice I have read on this group for a while.
Peter H
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The use of lawn products is heavily dependent on many factors. Fall treatments are probably the most important. You can use the recommendations as suggested on the Scotts web site, but the grass can't tell the difference between brands. Do not use weed-and-feed products.
On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 15:38:19 GMT, Forza Azzurri

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On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 15:38:19 GMT, Forza Azzurri

This works for the Detroit area which is most likely very similar to your climate.
4-07 Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control (time sensitive)
4-25 Spring Fertilizer
5-10 Weed and Feed
6-10 Weed and Feed
7-10 Weed and Feed
8-10 Weed and Feed
9-10 Weed and Feed
10-10 Fall Fertilizer
* You may also use a Broad Leaf Weed Killer in a Spray Bottle for Spot Killing of Weeds
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Wow. That looks like a lot of work. Down in Central Ohio I have a two step process.
Spring, about the time the grass starts to grow:
Slow release nitrogen fertilizer. I chose about 4-2-2 and a rate based on the nitrogen.
Fall:
Same as Spring maybe closer to 4-2-2 and at a little lower rate.
Spot weed control through the growing season.
Why all that weed and feed??? If you are having that much trouble I wonder if you may have other problems like cutting too short or watering practices that are not doing will. Also the usual fast release stuff using the most brand name stuff makes for weak grass and extra work and money on your part.
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Why not? Some lawns around here look like SOD farms. Using Weed and Feed once a month is a simple process. Lawns where neighbors don't use Weed and Feed are lees green and usually have some Dandelions in them.

My lawn looks great. I have no trouble with it because I keep on top of it. If you want a premium lawn you can not just fertilize in spring and fall.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

A few dandelions can be spot treated - spray or brush them with some RoundUp. Obsessing about the "prettiest" lawn in the neighborhood may leave the grandkids with no decent water to drink.

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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Proper use is better than just large qualities.
I only fertilize twice a year and I have the best looking lawn around. I have not used any general weed application in the 10 years I have owned my current home, only spot treatments and you can seldom see even a dandelion.
I suspect you can have a healthier, better looking lawn and do less work and spend less money if you work smarter, not harder.
I doubt if I am going to change you ways, but most of my neighbors have changed theirs, at least all of them with good looking lawns have.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

This is not a program I would recommend. I was in the business for about a dozen years in southern Ontario.
Peter H
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That's funny. I gathered most of this info from reading Jerry Bakers lawn care books. Maybe you should write your own book.
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clipped

Five applications of "weed and feed" per year is insane. Even in Florida, a high maintenance lawn "needs" only four apps per year of fertilizer. Owners of large lawns would be better off putting some of their sod back into lower maintenance plants, such as islands of shrubs and grondcover, or natural plants.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

That explains a lot. Baker is the county fair salesmen of the slicer - dicer of lawn care. 99.9% bunk. He did make money however.
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Forza Azzurri wrote:

It's a bit more involved than you may think. Many homeowners can get their lawn going well for a few years and then they run into problems.
When I was in the business I operated with a cost of goods of about 20%. I was buying in large quantities and you would pay about triple what I was paying. Throw in a few dollars for your effort and you're not saving anything at all.
If you're definitely going to do it yourself I would recommend that you put 4 lbs of nitrogen down per 1000 sq ft for the entire season. Avoid heavy fert being released in the summer. Spot treat the weeds and never use weed and feed. Wack the bugs with an insecticide each summer in the first two weeks of August.
Good luck
Peter H
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I agree with Peter and Joseph. No lawn needs 5 applications of weed and feed during the summer. I have no problem with using chemicals as needed, but this is extreme and using weed killer on the entire lawn because you have a few dandelions is environmentally unsound. Something is very wrong for a lawn to need that much weed killer. Plus, putting down excessive fertilizer in the summer is an invitatiation for disease and fungus, which likes water, nitrogen and high temps. Early April is early for pre-emergent in Detroit for maximum effectiveness too. It should be applied about the time forsythias bloom, which is not till late April here in NJ.
I apply fertilizer plus pre-emergent at that time in Spring, do spot weed control during the season, then apply fall fertilizer in early Sept and then again in late Oct or early Nov. During the summer, if needed, I also apply insect control and sometimes a light fertilizer.
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Contact MSU extension services to find the exact date. That is how I came up with 4-07 as a typicle date around Detroit.
You are correct on the Forsythia method.
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Forza Azzurri wrote:

The best thing to do is to, first, learn the best practices for mowing and watering. That will greatly reduce the need for other treatments. Package labels tend to maximize use of chemicals and don't often address the local issues. One application of a major broadleaf herbicide for weeds, for instance, may be all that you need for several years. Proper mowing and hand weeding can control what occurs later. I saw a news item yesterday about male bass in the ?Potomoc River that are producing eggs! They don't know the reason, for sure, but it is a very disturbing thought. We already have gators here in Florida with all kinds of deformities. Part of the increase in oil prices is supposedly from increased demand in China - wait 'til China gets as "modern" as the US - the polution will put the world back into the dark ages :o)
Think about slow release fertilizers, run-off, etc. Proper timing for herbicides and insecticides has everything to do with their effect and the need for future applications.
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