Latex or enamel for covered porch ?

I am sanding down a covered porch down to bare wood, and I am going to paint it. It is a "covered" porch in that it has a roof over it, but it is not fully protected, as it has open sides. So, it does get some wetness from blowing rain and snow.
I plan to use a basic primer, and then roll on the paint. Which paint is best for this porch, latex, or enamel ? Why ? Is either available in semi-gloss ?
Are any of the Walmart paints decent for this use ?
Thank you very much !!
James
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Why not a stain or oil? Then you do not have to worry about peeling and chipping. Even a good Paint Stain...... Many Products available... CWF Clear wood finish.... Some have oxides for tints and sunblock..... Easy to re-oil or stain too. just a thought. john

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I do prefer oil paints to latex though. Like a boat you know..... Also Kilz is a good oil base primer.... Yes, they have semi-gloss.... john

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James Nipper wrote:

You can get latex enamel. "Enamel" usually refers to the hardness of the coating and formulated for durability when exposed to the elements, moisture, or vibration. For an outdoor application, you'll definitely be better off with an enamel (oil-based or latex).
Again, for an outdoor application, I'd lather on several coats.
Hint: You can have your primer tinted to better match the final coat.
As for Walmart paints, they sell Dutch Boy and Kilz. Dutch Boy has been around forever and is probably adequate for most jobs. Kilz we all know about inasmuch as it is the standard for primers. You'd think their paints were equally good.
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wrote:

Enamel is a term for gloss and hardness, there is no enamel in paint, if you mean latex or oil, a true oil primer penetrates deeper as its molicules are smaller than latex. Quick dry primers dont do as well as good ol oil primer. Kilz is not a great primer for exterior. I wouldnt use Walmart but buy at a real paint store and get their advise. One coat oil primer and latex top coat is a great way to go. You can stain but you get a flat finish that will mark up easier. Saving on paint can take a job that might last 20-30 years into a problem in 5-7 years. A full service paint store is best. Benjamin moore or Sherwin Williams is good.
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wrote:

All good advice. I'd add, the final tint color can be added to the oil primer, which will help coverage. Sometimes they add 1/3 or 1/2 tint (helps see your coverage, too). Latex should be used for the top coat because it has better UV resistance and will last longer than oil. ...not to mention that it's a whole lot easier to apply. ;-)
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