Last step in the project of building a home soda machine for flavoring cola

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On 1/29/2013 2:35 AM, Danny D. wrote:

Add your efforts and time and making sodas would actually cost more. I was into home brewing and wine making and it was time consuming.
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You can say the same thing about home cooked food and restaurant food. The difference is you control what you put in your soda
Robert
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On 1/29/2013 9:51 AM, Robert wrote:

Good point but I guess working with extracts or concentrates you don't have choice of what is put in them. Also mention was made of need to use food grade carbon dioxide. I think you'll find oil in industrial grades.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 15:44:03 -0500, Frank wrote:

Are you sure that "food grade C02" even exists?
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On 1/29/2013 9:21 PM, Joe Mastroianni wrote:

You can google it up. I used to work in a lab and we were told industrial dry ice we used contained oil from machinery used to produce it. I assumed same might be true for bottled gas.
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On 1/28/2013 3:44 PM, Danny D. wrote:

restaurants.
One of the most important ingredients in any homebrew food product is "expectations". If you're trying to make something that tastes like "coke", you're likely to be disappointed. If you're trying to make a carbonated beverage that doesn't taste awful, you'll have more success. Carbonated water doesn't taste awful after you get used to it ;-)
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On Mon, 28 Jan 2013 18:03:30 -0800, mike wrote:

Luckily, the single-blind test I did with the wife & kids of the three colas (Coke, store brand, and Soda Stream) came out OK on taste.
The problem I'm trying to solve is to lower the cost of the cola syrup.

The kids think so.
However, I created lemon extract at home simply by scraping lemon peel zest into vodka, which I used to flavor the "adult" carbonated water.
Here's a picture of that home made lemon extract (in the small jar):

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On 1/29/2013 2:30 AM, Danny D. wrote:

Only because they are used to sweet stuff.

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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 08:18:24 -0500, George wrote:

True. The kids think carbonated water is god awful.
The wife, on the other hand, enjoys a bottle with just a few drops of my home-made lemon extract.
For the lemon extract, I simply steep zested peels (the yellow, not the white inside of the rind) in the strongest cheapest concentration of ethanol I can find (which is Vodka).
Unfortunately, I'm paying the "alcohol sin tax", even though the point isn't to 'drink' the alcohol used.
BTW, is there a cheaper source of strong ethanol other than Vodka?
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On 1/29/2013 10:21 AM, Danny D. wrote:

everclear
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chaniarts wrote:

Or if you don't mind if it's flavored a bit and not clear, Ronrico 151 rum (Ronrico costs about 1/2 what Bacardi does)
Bob
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 10:39:37 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

Hmmm... I never heard of it (but I'm admittedly not a connoisseur of hard liquors by any stretch of the imagination).
Looking it up, it's ethanol from corn (versus Vodka, which is ethanol from potatoes).
It looks like I can get 190 proof (95% ethanol) so that would be perfect as the Vodka I'm buying is only something like 100 proof (50%).
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Look for everclear. around the same price but its 200 proof.
Robert
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 18:13:36 -0500, "Robert"

No more than 190 proof (though some is "only" 150 proof). Ethanol can't be distilled beyond 95%. To get it more pure, things like Benzene have to be added, which just kills the flavor.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2013 20:35:17 -0500, krw wrote:

Look at what I just found in my "chemical stash" from grad school days!

It's pure ethanol, with a long tax stamp even! It has to be 35 years old or more!
I don't see 'any' mention of benzene on the bottle though ...
PS: When did they stop using tax stamps on alcohol?
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 19:40:15 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

That's how it's made. Alcohol and water *CANNOT* be distilled above 95%. Impossible. To make "pure" alcohol, one adds 5% benzene to the 95% alcohol/water mix and then distills the alcohol off from that. There will always be a trace of benzene in the resulting alcohol; enough that you really don't want to drink it.

Did they?
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 20:03:50 -0500, krw wrote:

I remember drinking these bottles a very long while ago. Maybe I shouldn't have.
BTW, there is NOTHING about the benzene being in the ingredients. It says it's pure ethanol, USP.
The tax stamp goes across the cap and down each side. Didn't all liquor have these stamps in the olden days?
They certainly don't have them now.
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On Thu, 31 Jan 2013 03:31:42 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Well... <gazes down at his shoes...>

USP is branding. They don't include trace chemicals.

I've seen a *lot* of those bottles. When I was in college we used to use the stuff for cleaning electronics. Without the taxes, it's cheap.

Just asking. I don't think I've bought a bottle of liquor for at least a decade, probably two or more. I still have an unopened bottle of Chevas Royal Salute my MIL brought back from England (duty free) in '84, I think.
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Danny D. wrote:

There's other ways to remove the last trace of water besides distillation.
Bob
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On Wed, 30 Jan 2013 22:04:09 -0600, zxcvbob wrote:

Here are better pictures of the bottle in my possession.
1. Tax stamp (this bottle is probably from the 70's):

2. Front of bottle:

3. Back of bottle:

And, yes. It is still mighty potent. Ask me how I know! :)
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