Last lightbulb factory closes - sniff

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"[WINCHESTER, VA.] The last major GE factory making ordinary incandescent light bulbs in the United States is closing this month, marking a small, sad exit for a product and company that can trace their roots to Thomas Alva Edison's innovations in the 1870s."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/07/AR2010090706933.html
I have no idea how all my Lava Lamps will continue to work if I can't get the right kind of bulbs!
In 2007, a Democratic Congress mandated that incandescent bulbs must not be produced beyond 2014.
But find a need and fill it, I say.
One could encase a CFL is a glass container shaped like a classic bulb, complete with a heating element and probably get close to replicating the bulbs we've grown to love.
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On 9/8/2010 2:39 PM HeyBub spake thus:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/07/AR2010090706933.html
So who said that GE was the onlh mfgr. of regliar old light bulbs?
Hell, most of the ones I see nowadays come from China. Can get them at the dollar store for, like 2-4 for a buck.
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wrote:

I would get Sylvania ones from Lowes for a similarly low price. A 75 watt "standard" Sylvania (or GE or Philips) lightbulb produces slightly more light than a 100 watt dollar store stool specimen.
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- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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The upcoming incandescent ban scheduled to take effect in stages from January 2012 to January 2014 has a lot of exemptions.
http://members.misty.com/don/incban.html
Some lava lamps take incandescent bulbs of lower wattage and accordingly of lower light output than the range affected by the ban. Incandescents of 25 watts or less are generally not affected by the ban.
Some lava lamps take reflector bulbs, which are not affected by the ban.
If you need a "regular light bulb shape" incandescent of 40 to 100 watts, you can get rough service ones, which are not affected by the ban. There are also Philips "Halogena Energy Saver" bulbs, which have energy efficiency high enough to get around the ban.
Also not affected by the ban are tubular bulbs, globular vanity ones, ones with bases other than medium screw, flame shape ones, ones designed for voltage less than 110 or more than 130 volts, ones producing more than 2600 lumens, and most colored ones.
--
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)

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snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

My LL requires 40 w bulbs. The way I use it probably qualifies as "rough service" anyway (grin).

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Yes, the 40 watt Halogena Energy Saver produces nearly the same amount of heat as a regular 40 watt incandescent. What it does differently is produce almost twice as much light as a regular 40 watt incandescent, close to as much as a 60 watt regular incandescent produces.
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On Wed, 8 Sep 2010 22:33:27 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

If that's the case, maybe I'll just rewire all the lights for 240V.
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Oh, come on!
The CFLs work "pretty gud!" Over all they can save quite a bit of change.
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When the CFL first became available, I tried one and after 30 minutes replaced it with a regular bulb again.. Over the years, they've improved them considerably and I now use CFL in most places in the house. The color is far superior to what it used to be with that sickly green cast.
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I agree - the 2700 degree CFLs (Sylvania mostly) are very good color temps for interior use. They do OK for warmup time, but it still takes 30 seconds to come to full brightness.
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On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 18:07:19 -0600, Robert Neville wrote:

Is that similar light to incandescent bulbs? It'd rather have WHITE light than that yellow.
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

I don't care what anyone else says, I still like to use incandescent bulbs for certain locations. Like in the bathroom, the kitchen, or the laundry room, all locations where the light is often used only for a short period, and when I want it on, I want it on now. I also want the color of the light.
Same with the fixture near my chair in the living room; when I turn that on, I want it to come on fully right away.
The other location is in my welding rod storage oven, in which a 60 watt incandescent bulb keeps it at the proper temperature for storing certain rods.
If people want to use CFL bulbs, and I do in some locations, that is great, but those of us who still have a use for incandescent bulbs should be able to buy them whenever we feel we have the need. I would rather not have to stockpile 50 years' worth of bulbs, but if it comes down to it, I'll have to do just that. Bastards.
Jon
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On Sat, 11 Sep 2010 11:14:29 -0700, Jon Danniken wrote:
[snip]

Places where it gets too cold or hot for CFLs to work right.
Some switches (like dimmers and remotes) depend on current through the bulb, and don't work right with CFLs.
[snip]

I use a fluorscent fixture (4-foot T8, not CFL) behind my chair. Good white light (you can get "yellow" tubes too) and it doesn't take too long to light.
BTW, the only CFLs I've seen that take longer than a second to come on are a couple of outdoor floodlights.

Another use for incandescents. My grandmother used them in her greenhouse for that reason (heat).
[snip]
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The upcoming "incandescent ban" has a set of loopholes that the Mississippi River can be rerouted through, "in my words".
http://members.misty.com/don/incban.html
Merely most and not all of the exemptions:
* Reflectorized bulbs such as R, BR, K-reflectorized and PAR types
* Ones producing over 2600 lumens (which better 150W ones do)
* Ones producing less than 310 lumens (nearly all 120V incandescents 25 watts or less and most low voltage ones 15 watts or less, as well as all 15 watts or less that fail to be exempted on basis of meeting/ exceeding an efficiency efficiency standard)
* Ones of tubular or vanity-globe/decorative-globe or flame shape
* Ones with base other than right-hand E26/E27 medium screw
(Exempts nearly all automotive and most other miniature types as well as most photographic/projection incandescents, including most of the minority of such that fails to be exempted on basis of bulb style, design voltage, or design light output outside the range of 310-2600 lumens)
* Ones with design voltage outside the range of 110-130 volts
(That exemption includes nearly all automotive incandescents, incandescent flashlight bulbs, etc. even in the unlikely event no other exemptions apply)
* Ones that meet/exceed an energy efficiency standard that a few incandescents now meet, notably including Philips "Halogena Energy Saver" of "roughly regular lightbulb shape and size"
* "Rough Service" / "Vibration Service" / "Shatter Resistant"
* 3-way
* Traffic Signal
* Mine, Train, Marine
* "S-shape" theater marquee units
* Bug non-atracting lamps
* Most colored ones, but not "daylight" nor "enrich"/"reveal"/"neodymium" unless exempted by any of the many other means of exemption
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Yes, it is close to soft white incandescent.
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wrote:

avoiding sickly green CFL, we went to a Friendly's restaurant and it looked very bright in there. They replaced all the bulbs with the newer CFLs. I went and bought some a few days later.
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2700K CFLs mostly approximate incandescents of one sort or another, though some 2700K CFLs (mostly older types and higher wattages) are a bit pinkish in comparison to incandescents that they "best approximate".
For a whiter light, which I prefer, I like 3500K CFLs. 3500K is a "whiter warm white", similar to higher color temp. halogen, projector, and photoflood incandescents.
Both Lowes and Home Depot have a wide enough range of wattages of 3500K spiral CFLs.
Please keep in mind that the whiter 3500K may have a bit of "dreary gray effect" in dimmer home lighting situations such as dimmish basement and hallway lighting.
For the next step to "truly white", that is 4100 K. My favorite source of those is many hardware stores carrying the "Westpointe" line by the "True Value" hardware store supplier. Even though the color is like that of "average direct sunlight", it easily gets "dreary grayish" unless illumination level is "nice-and-bright" like that of offices, classrooms and more-brightly-illuminated retail stores.
Even higher color temperature such as 5500K (Home Depot) or 6500K (Lowes or Target) is good in dimmer situations when "dreary gray" but "adequate but dimmish" illumination is OK, such as many places outdoors at night, or "nightlighting" of hallways, stairways and basements. Such higher-K icy-cold-slightly-bluish white has a spectrum favorable to making use of "night vision".
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This house is 2-1/2 years old. The only bulb, of 50, that has been changed are is the ceiling fan on the back porch, where heat and vibration team up. I have no use for CFLs and will never install them, at least until I have no choice. I will have ~300-400 by the time the ban goes into effect. Since I've used one in two years, I should be set for a while.
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I'd have agreed with you a few years ago. Now the CFLs can be as good or better than the incans and I'm saving $$$ to boot. I actually prefer the whiter light from the CFL bulbs we now have.
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We had can lighting in the kitchen in our previous house and I much preferred halogen spots; very bright white. ALl of our bulbs now are unfrosted and visible, so no halogens. CFLs would be incredibly ugly. The only place I've used a CFL, grudgingly, was in a fan over the stairs where it was a RPITA to change and vibration kept killing incandescents. In the Winter it would take five minutes to come up to full brightness. That light was *rarely* on five minutes (only used to light the stairs).
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