Laser Levels

I'm looking for a laser level for under $60.00. This tool will used for my home projects only. I'll be using it for basic home repairs and projects such as tiles, decks, etc. I'm looking for the best bang for the 60 bucks.
Thanks,
Jason
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In alt.home.repair snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jason) wrote:

About $15 at harborfreight.com
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Check Cosco's
(jason) wrote:

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In alt.home.repair

Is that the same as Costco's? If so, no thanks. Membership is too expensive.

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Whaa? I went to Costco yesterday and spent $450 on "stuff." You gotta watch the prices, but you can definitely save some $$$ over the course of a year. More than enough, IMHO, to offset the "expensive" membership. I figger I saved enough just yesterday to pay for this year's membership.
Steve
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In alt.home.repair

Steve,
I have a Sam's Membership. Costco is more expensive, farther away, has fewer location also. I did have a membership but didn't renew because I like Sam's better. There are aspects of Costco I liked and if I could pay for the membership on one large purchase, I would do it again. But only if Sam's didn't have an equivalent.
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wrote:

What you say is entirely true. So, it really depends on how far it is to a "membership" store, and how much you spend in such stores in a year. I pooh poohed them, and then went in when they sent "free day's admission" coupons. I saw that they had a lot of stuff I used on a regular basis, and now belong to both. I also have rental houses where we use a quantity of various supplies they sell.
So, bottom line, as you say, it depends. But I really do not believe that either is too expensive.
Steve
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In alt.home.repair

What I meant by too expensive was that Sams is $35 and Costco is $45. How do they justify that? The commodity items you talk about I can get at Sams so there is no sense in joining Costco for them. If there was one big ticket item that would pay for the Costco, I'd do it.
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What you should do is like I did--- I have a Sam's card and I got a guest membership card for my friend. He has a costco card and got a guest membership for me. So we both made out on it. I kind of like Sam's better too, but you have to price shop. I think Costco has a better selection of tools.
wrote:

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wrote:

If they are the SAME item, that is same manufacturer and same model, then you would be a fool to buy the more expensive one.
What I meant by "too expensive" is that lasers today can be bought for a very reasonable price. Laser measuring tapes and laser illuminators are very reasonable TODAY. Considering that five years ago they would have cost a lot more, and most would not have even been available.
Steve
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Consider these points:
Lasers area different. Some will throw a straight line like a piece of uncooked spaghetti. That is, it is round, and has a small diameter. Others will throw a PLANE of light, that is like a sheet of paper. Some will do both.
In some instances, you want just a straight little string of light, and in others, you want the light to go all around, like if you want to shoot a horizontal line all around a room as a painting guide. Or as a nailing guide.
Some lasers have a diffuser that lets you shoot a string of light, or a sheet of light. Some do not have the multiple function capability. I would get the one that does both.
Just a consideration when shopping.
And another thing that is NOT a consideration when shopping:
Laser accuracy is rated at 1/4" at 25 feet. Not great. Keep that in mind if you really need accuracy. But as a straight line guide, they are very helpful. You might want to use something like a water level if you really want to get your deck posts at the same height, and then use the laser for the straight line stuff.
Just some observations from trial and error.
Steve
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Yeah well from my trial and error:
Maybe putting a dot on an opposite wall is great for some or even projecting a line on a wall both of which my $40 laser level from HD does but I can't for the life of me see why I'd use these functions. What I wanted to do was project a straight line on the floor until it hits the wall opposite but this it doesn't do.
IOW I wanted it to replace a chalk line... you know the drill: snap a line about the center of the room and then check to see that you have a whole or large tile at the edge. If not move a little to the left or right and snap a new line. Check again...etc. About 10 chalk lines later... er, which one was the best fit? No help from the laser.
Oh yeah another problem was the width of the beam. I anticipated something about pencil-line thick; instead it's crayon width. Was this the product Reagan's Star Wars was supposed to be based on?
AFAIC laser levels are a product not yet ready for prime time.
-- Patrick Riley
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wrote:

Lasers are a technology and not a "product" and they are able to do some really amazing precision stuff.
I think "Star Wars" was a great strategy. Remember that USSR place? Heard anything about it lately?

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The one I own can do exactly that. The beam "plane" can be rotated to any angle, including vertical.

There appears to be a tradeoff between beam width and visibility. One of the models I bought (and returned) had a very narrow beam width, but it was almost impossible to see unless I was working at night. Of course, you could always crank up the power output, but I would rather not worry about frying my eyes.
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Yes, maybe I'm not expressing myself well. My laser level does do a "beam" and can project it on the opposite wall and indeed it can be rotated to any angle--of course then you would have to use a regular spirit level on the "beam" to determine verticality or horizontality (are those words?) but you can't get it to point down and then across the floor to make a pseudo-chalk line.

You can fit more than one AA battery in yours? <g>
I notice that Sears now has one that's sold with special glasses to make seeing the beam easier. It also seems to have a better leveling mechanism--there's a spirit level built in and it has screws around the perimeter to adjust the angle. Now if it could only project a line on the floor and, even better, two lines at right angles.
-- Patrick Riley
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It can project a line on the floor -- the front bezel can be rotated so that the beam plane is vertical (it lights a line across the floor and the ceiling). There are click stops for the horizontal and vertical beam positions, so the built-in levels (2 of them at right angles) ensure that the beam is either vertical or horizontal.
--
Murray Peterson
Email: murray snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca (remove underscore)
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