Laptop Motherboard

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Like running over it with his Toyota, and taking it back for the damage replacement guarantee.
Steve
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If the only thing you cut was solder-traces on the surface, than the only thing you should need is a soldering iron, more solder, and thorazine. If you hit any components, even just the pins, you should replace the entire component.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you did not violate the integrity of the pre-preg dielectric material (this is the material the the copper is etched onto) to the inner layers, then chances are that it is repairable.
Gluing wires down and trying to solder them is one idea but this is not structurally sound because theses traces are very fragile. You would probably create another stress point along the trace and then it would break there. This is almost next to impossible to do.
If you can follow the trace from both ends and find vias (these are holes that transition the circuit from one layer to another) you could attach a wire to these vias and bridge the cut. That might work. However, you need really thin wire to do this (30 AWG or smaller)
Either method you will need:
A microscope, conductive epoxy, solder mask, an exacto knife and a steady hand. Links to these products: http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/8331.html http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/itemDetailsRender.shtml?xi=xi&ItemId11780257
This is my preferred method.
First, carefully scrape back the existing solder mask (the green coating on the board usually but can be some other color) of the existing circuit trace to expose some good copper, and also the around affected area where the epoxy will be applied. Be careful not to cut anymore traces as they are probably bunched tightly together. Clean with denatured alcohol. Let dry. Place a small bead of the epoxy using the supplied syringe to bridge the gap of the cut. Let dry, then apply the solder mask
This is a tough job and chances are it might not work. You have alot of variables against you to start. I have done this before on other types of cards but I had much thicker traces to deal with. For me, this has worked on 8 mil traces and larger. Circuit traces on a mobo are typically 4 mils or less, that's 0.004" Good luck :)
Ed B
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Ed B wrote:

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/itemDetailsRender.shtml?xi=xi&ItemId11780257

Wirewrap wire work pretty good for making repairs. (Do they still sell that stuff?)
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Depending on the traces that you cut (primarily the speed of signals sent along those traces) you may not be able to repair them. By adding additional length/resistance/capacitance to the trace, the repair could change the way signal travels on the trace. In principle, data travelling at very high speeds on the repaired traces could be unreliable. You can go ahead and try if you like, but even if you repair them correctly, there is no guarantee that the motherboard will work correctly. Hopefully the traces you cut were low speed or power traces.
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unless he is good at soldering PC boards he is probably better off finding a local private computer tech and getting his or her opinion. We have one of those here, my friend nick who has got me out of a couple jams cheap.
although I never did anything like this.worst was connections pulled loose and I had no idea where they went:(
my mom got mad once and smashed a radio:( I am still looking for one like it. Today its a collectible model:( Worth hundreds of bucks!
!!!!!!!!!! I SERIOUSLY SUGGEST THE ORIGINAL POSTER SEEK COUNCLING OR ANGER MANAGEMENT CLASSES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
before something even worse occurs
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
-> I took a knife to my laptop and cut several circuits on my laptop's -> motherboard for reasons which will not be stated. I now want to fix it -> up, but I don't know where to start. What materials do I need, and how -> would I go about fixing these circuits. I know exactly where I made my -> cuts, and I was thinking I could take some copper wire or something and -> lay it down, maybe solder it on? But, I don't know if this is the best -> way. Thank you for your time and interest.
I've heard that duct tape can fix just about anything.
--
8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

typical repair would be to take a small piece of wire and jumper over the cut traces, soldering it in on either end. You may need to clean off the solder locations with nail polish remover to get off any protective coating. Use a hot air gun and not a soldering iron if you can.
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Try cutting some masking tape & taping outside the trace for about 1/4" on either side of the break. Clean the trace as well as you can. Paint on a little conductive paint or "rear window defroster repair" compound. Have used this successfully on CPU's & keyboards.
R

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