Laptop Motherboard

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I took a knife to my laptop and cut several circuits on my laptop's motherboard for reasons which will not be stated. I now want to fix it up, but I don't know where to start. What materials do I need, and how would I go about fixing these circuits. I know exactly where I made my cuts, and I was thinking I could take some copper wire or something and lay it down, maybe solder it on? But, I don't know if this is the best way. Thank you for your time and interest.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hi, First, model of Laptop? Your level of electronics knowledge? If you're not trolling and serious about it, just replace the mobo. Hopefully your cpu is in a socket, not permanently soldered in. eBay is a good place to try for replacement.
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Not looking for a replacement, as I already bought a new laptop. My knowledge of electronics is all software side, I have never worked with hardware like this before. I am serious about fixing it however. I have taken most of the case off, a little is left, but I believe with a few more screws it will come off quite nicely.
The link to my laptops model is: http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?dlc=en&lc=en&cc=us&dest_page=product&productD2915
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http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?dlc=en&lc=en&cc=us&dest_page=product&productD2915
Yeah, like I'm going to click into that link.
Here's what you need to do. Take a framing hammer. Fold the laptop shut. Lay it on a concrete floor Give it three blows in the center just like you are nailing home a 16d sinker.
That should fix it for good.
Glad to help.
Reminds me of when I bent about fifty pins while setting a CPU into a motherboard.
BTW, I did fix it without the use of a hammer.
Steve
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You know steve if you aren't interested in helping then don't post, its as simple as that. Tony thanks for your interest in helping.
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Get a short length of appliance power cord and cut about an inch of it off. Then clean the coating off the traces you cut. Pull some strands of the fine bare wires out of the 1 inch piece of cord. Use a small soldering iron and "bridge" the cut traces with the wire. Cut off the excess. Using a decent solder and some good soldering flux will make this a lot easier. Be sure you have a good light and a magnifying glass to check your work. Clean the repair with alcohol to get any remaining flux off. If you're real careful you can clean the coating off the board and cut the excess fine wire with a X-acto knife.
Al
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Big Al wrote:

Yes I have repaired things like this. Depends on how much damage you've done, how big the gaps are, how patient you are. My method is like the above poster. I would add: I use a silver bearing solder (if it's really fine I "draw down" the solder), extremely fine tip, temperature controlled iron, I also try to stagger the repairs soldering micro traces that are adjacent to each other will send you to the funny farm. If you can't do that you can do micro wires point to bridge the damage at a different point on the trace. I also have an free arm magnifier. One like the dentist uses or micro surgeons use would be indispensable. Richard
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spudnuty wrote:

Hi, We're talking about etch run traces of one fifth of a thousand inch and up. Even nero surgeon would have trouble soldering them together. One possibility is jumpering them from adjacent eyelet to eyelet of both sides.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

There you go .;>) Richard
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Assuming that only top level traces were cut. Many motherboards have 6-12 layers in the PCB. You will not be able to fix inner level traces.
Assuming that no traces had critical timing signals which adding repair traces will change the impedance and screw up timing thus cause crashes if it did ever boot again.
Best bet is to try and salvage the LCD display for some kind of project or desktop monitor.
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Why do I continuously hear the sound of a troll reeling in a fish?
Steve
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Your chances of repairing your motherboard using my method are as good as any. Probably better. When I got my last laptop, I got the new Circuit City guarantee that covers ANY damage. I could do the hammer repair method with MINE, and I would end up with a new laptop that worked perfectly.
I just thought it would work as well with yours.
Please keep us posted as to how those repairs on the microwire circuits are coming. It will be very interesting. If you are able to repair it, you should apply at NASA or at least at a major computer company. They will have you doing A+ repair work at $8 per hour, but I bet they would bump you up a bit when they see your abilities.
STeve
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?dlc=en&lc=en&cc=us&dest_page=product&productD2915
Hi, I don't know specifics of damages suffered. If it's on mobo itself I never saw/heard anyone repairing them. I know components,ribbon type flex cables can be replaced but if knife caused a deep scratch across mobo and cause damage to etch runs, I don't think it is possible to reconnect them. I can do SMT work, am mil-spec soldering certified in my working days. But I don't know how to reconnect that hair line size etch runs. Mobo is multi-layer as well. Not just double side. How about a few pictures to show the damage.
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On 16 Feb 2006 20:42:57 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Chances are excellent from the little description you give that the board will not be repairable by you or anyone else, regardless of skill level or equipment. The reason is that the runs are not just on the surface. You have no doubt nicked traces in other layers of the board. It doesn't take much! Can't be repaired. Simple as that.
If you need this laptop to work again, your only hope is to find another of the same model on Ebay with a bad hard drive or screen for very cheap, and swap out the board.
Mys Terry
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better to buy a used identical unit and move the hard drive, sorry this is one that cant be fixed for a resonable amount of $$, or get a new motherboard.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you want help, you have to fess up to why you would intentionally take a knife to a laptop. Otherwise we can't help you.
No one can help you.
Unless you want to help yourself, of course.
How did it make you feel when you were cutting the motherboard?
Were you having any feelings about your own Mother at that point?
Steve
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On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 08:23:29 -0800, "Steve B"

I'm afraid he can't read the replies. He's already cut the cables on his computer. I can't tell you why.

Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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wrote:

Oh, that's right. He cut up his computer, then sent a message with it to ask how to repair it.
I smell tuna.
Or some kind of fish.
Or maybe something fishy.
Or maybe a troll.
Steve
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Mys Terry wrote:

I've replaced soldered-on components on a laptop motherboard before. It was kind of scary, but not all that hard to do. The hardest part was getting to the mobo.
There's no harm in trying to bridge the cut traces to fix it; if it doesn't work he can try to find another working system with a broken screen etc. to strip for parts. That's often cheaper than buying a new part, and he gets a spare keyboard and stuff out of the deal.
Bob
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wrote:

Not the same as what this guy is up against.

I agree there is no harm in trying, but there is also no (ZERO) hope it will be successful. It's a wasted effort. That's why I suggested he simply go for the solution that will work.
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