Landscape after pool removal


I bought a modest home 10 years back with a 21 foot diameter above ground pool in the back yard (south side of home) in zone 4 weather wise in the midwest (typical winter cold is 20 degrees F, rarely below zero, occasionally near zero). Last year I went all summer without opening the pool as our deck is in need of replacing and it never made it to the top of the priority list.
My wife says we should take out the 20 year old pool and replace it with a paver patio and some landscaping. I want to do this right as the deck and patio need to last for many years as I doubt we will move anytime soon. I am still young enough to do some work myself but I don't want to be re-doing this in 5, 10 or even 20 years if it can be avoided. Accordingly I am willing to splurge for the artificial decking if it is truly a one-time expense for a guy aged 45.
Please point me to resources, locations or people so that I fully think this project through. Any and all advice welcome regarding the deck, landscaping, patio or just humor.
TIA, One_Patriotic_Guy
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My advice would be to leave the pool in place until the day before you're ready to start doing whatever else to that spot. On that day, it'll be as weed-free as you can hope for. On the other hand, give nature a week or three to fill the void, and that's what will happen. It'll be much more work at that point.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

level and stake it down until work commences. That way there's less insurance risk, and an eyesore is less obvious.
As to the rest of it, I can't help. :-)
-Nathan
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camel snipped-for-privacy@radiks.net wrote:

Just a comment on decks - if you have a decent budget and want something that will really last, consider a cedar deck put together with stainless steel screws and stainless steel ring shank nails. It will still look great as you and your guests celebrate at your retirement party. Redwood might also be good. Some of the composite deck materials are prone to sags and installation hassles. UV resistance long term may also be a problem. Due diligence on these is advisable. HTH
Joe
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As far as the landscaping, the best thing you could possibly do would be to bury yourselves in library books with lots of pictures. Get some Post It notes, and stick them in pages where you see ideas you like. Take the books to garden centers. Home Depot and Lowe's are not garden centers, unless you're stupid and you think your doctor's office is an airport. Get advice, and be sure to ask what sort of care certain plants need in the future.
According to one amazing garden writer, Henry Mitchell, any time you think you want a small tree, buy a large shrub. Small trees often end up the size of a one car garage, which may not be what you wanted. His two books are VERY easy to read, and loaded with advice. "The Essential Earthman" and "One Man's Garden".
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