Landlords annual inspection of apartment houses...why?

I've been living in the same apartment for six years and every year I get a brief visit from the landlord.
This year was a visit by three unhappy strangers that spent three minutes looking around. Any idea why they do it? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/12/2013 12:37 PM, geo pearl wrote:

Making sure tenants aren't totally trashing the place, primarily (including running meth labs, etc., etc., etc., ...). Serious other maintenance issues, etc., observed secondarily.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They're looking for stuff to steal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
geo pearl wrote:

Turning the table around, wouldn't you do the same to make sure all is well and in order? Good time if tenant has any issues/concern to raise as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/12/2013 1:37 PM, geo pearl wrote:

Lets say you are the landlord and you have made an investment in property. Would you check things out once in a while?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/12/2013 1:37 PM, geo pearl wrote:

You should have asked 'them' who they were and why they were there, especially since they were 'strangers'.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Simple explanation. We told him about you and now he does not trust you. He feels it is necessary to spy on you. Consider having the cameras and microphones removed too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 May 2013 10:37:11 -0700 (PDT), geo pearl

I agree with the others.
This year, he may be considering selling the building to them and they want to see it first. Whether they buy it or not, they'll tell the ll what they see that is bad.
I had a roommate and a leaking radiator in his room, but he was too low-class to tell me, the lease-holder, that the radiator was leaking. He let it ruin 3 or 4 square feet of parquet floor, plus he almost ruined my blanket that he took from a closet to soak up the water. I learned this after I kicked him out, for other reasons. I should have done inspections of his room.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 May 2013 18:02:32 -0400, micky wrote:

Similar thing happened to me at an apartment I used to live in. A short notice inspection, with several people walking through. They were decent about it and gave me the option to refuse, so I let them walk through. They turned out to be buyers.
Glad I didn't live there much longer as the new owners were real amateurs.
They (a married couple, he was a fancy dandy that looked like he had never had dirty hands his entire adult life) thought they could upgrade to three prong electric receptacles by attaching the ground to the receptacle box! She insisted that since the box was metal, it was a ground. It was very hard not to laugh at her when I told her that she may find that there was substantially more to it than that.
--
Tony Sivori

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it was metal conduit to the box, then she was on the ball.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Attila Iskander;3063430 Wrote: >

> hard not to laugh at her when I told her that she may find that there > was substantially more to it than that.

I don't think it even needs to be metal conduit.
You'll find that there are different building codes for commercial buildings like apartment blocks and office buildings than there are for houses. At least that's the case here in Canada.
For example, in a house, you're only required to use Type M copper tube for the supply piping, whereas in an apartment block (in Canada at least), you need to use Type L, which is a bit thicker wall.
For commercial buildings in Canada, the wiring has to be done with armored cable:
[image:
http://www.generalwholesaleco.com/pc/catalog/bx12250.jpg ]
Even though the armored cable in my building has an aluminum strip inside it (that I was told could be used as a ground wire), I've never seen that strip used as a ground. The electrical contractors that wired my building in 1960 simply ran a short green ground wire from each electrical outlet or switch to a grounding screw inside the electrical box. They were effectively relying on the steel armor of the cable to act as the ground wire.
In fact, that green ground wire was probably only required by code since the steel screws used to mount the receptacles and switches to the electrical boxes would have effectively grounded them to the electrical boxes as well. (It's just that using those screws as the grounding wire wouldn't pass an electrical inspection.)
So, I agree with Attila on this one. If it was an apartment block, it was most likely wired with armored cable, and upgrading to three prong polarized receptacles could have been done by simply installing the new receptacles and relying on the cable armour to act as the ground wire.
I'm not an electrician, and I expect an electrical inspector could want to see a dedicated ground wire, but that's what's commonly done here in Canada, and it hasn't caused any problems as a result.
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

my understanding is not because of problem between you and landlord, but rather, third party is involved, looking over landlord's shoulder so to speak. each state's legal requirements and for insurance reasons. Don't inspect, no insurance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

# my understanding is not because of problem between you and landlord, # but rather, third party is involved, looking over landlord's shoulder # so to speak. each state's legal requirements and for insurance # reasons. Don't inspect, no insurance.
Landlord inspections serve 2 purposes 1) Allow landlord to look for problems that need fixing 2) Allow landlord to check that facility is not being abused / dammed by tenant
I require quarterly inspections in my leases And every time I do a fix or upgrade allows me to do another as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was a landlord for 25 years and I wish I had followed your post. It would need to be written into the lease, pointed out to the prospective tenant and initialled separately by them and the penalties for failing to comply spelled out....and initialled. If I had done that, I would be many dollars ahead right now...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Indeed, such clauses are standard in the lease. I also found that if you are are quite prompt with a repair and then ask if anything else is getting wonky, after a while the tenant gets used to you being around to see what needs fixing. Half the time, I don't even need to inspect. They'll come to me and mention that a faucet is getting ready to drip because it's getting harder to close. Some of my tenants actually do some of the smaller repairs for me as long as I supply the parts. Kind of nice to get a call that the bathroom sink hot water is starting to drip, and do I have a replacement washer for it ? I have tried to standardize all my fixtures over time, so that I have basically the same parts for all the units. That also allows me to keep a box full of spare parts with my master list of what goes where. It's always easier if you can look up what is needed where and the reach into a box that has a couple of spares.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.