land survey- will put wood post, but need alternative

Hi, a survey will be done on one of my properties. They will put wood stakes on the 4 corners. What is a good alternative to put there so that if the stick is removed I will know the border. Someone mentioned buying a metal pipe and digging a hole with cement etc. Any other good suggestions?
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8 foot electrical galvanized ground rod works well

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wrote:

With a metal rod driven into the ground you can find it later with a metal detector - one example :-)
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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Posthole fulla cement, with a thick stainless steel rod at the exact corner. If you wanna get fancy, surveying supply places sell purpose-made pins to use for benchmarks. Let the surveyer use his wood sticks, but put crossed strings from 4 other sticks over the center before you pull it out and replace with a permanent monument.
Most people just use a big iron rod, something thick enough to take several decades to rust away. As long as you and one nearby neighbor have one good trustworthy corner marker each, they can always work backward from those. (yeah, I know they use GPS now, but they need to keep the knowledge alive in case that system goes away.)
aem sends...
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Typically a metal rod a couple feet long or longer is driven and the coordinates marked/stamped on the end. A metal detector is then useful in locating it later on...
Some do form little (say 4-6" square) little concrete markers but they're easy to lose unless they stick up quite some distance and not so easy to find...
--


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If it's ever been surveyed before (how else could it have been defined), then there should be metal stakes at the corners already.
--
Steve Barker





"KOS" < snipped-for-privacy@excite.com> wrote in message
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On Sun, 3 Jun 2007 20:59:18 -0500, "Steve Barker"

I owned a home in up state NY once. The tile search by a lawyer showed the land originated from either Mohawk or Niagara Indians... seems the road or my property was a trail along the history.
Just recently ( larger city) I found my markers etched in the side walk with a concrete saw blade.... just a one tic cut...
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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...
All kinds of ways -- the old oak tree, so many feet from some other existing mark, the old fence line, the legals (N 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of S 1/2 of Section 12, Range 33, Township 6), ...
It's possible to transfer title for generations and nobody ever bothers to actually determine _precisely_ where the corners are located. Of course, there may be markers, there may have _been_ markers, ...
As a bonus points question, how large is the parcel above? :)
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I owned a house at one time where the deed described the property line at one point as something like "and continues (so many) feet easterly untily coming to a privy which is there situate, whereupon it contiunes southerly..." You get the picture.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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Larry W wrote:

"...[from] the old oak tree, so many feet..."
Yes, I think I provided the kind of picture... :)
In TN, wife's family had at one time a deed that proclaimed ownership from a particular pair of points bounded by lines "extending to the Pacific Ocean"...needless to say, they were never able to fully occupy their entire estate :). But until after the war controlled a very large area in the valley. At this point the family holdings are down to the location of the original house and about 60 A surrounding it.
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On Jun 4, 5:40 am, snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

Just happened to hear a re-broadcast of a Bruce Williams show over Memorial Day weekend where a person called in from MN or similar area with a question on settling a parcel of land which was inherited as an "undivided interest in the SW 1/4 of ...". Poor Bruce having come from NJ originally and presently living in Miami had no clue of the uniform survey system of the bulk of the midwest and spent some 10 minutes or more trying to a) "explain" to this lady why there just "had to be" some survey describing this parcel, and b) failing totally to get the concept as she tried to describe it... :)
POV of and frame of reference is everything sometimes...I had heard the original show as well and was in near a epileptic fit over how someone w/ that experience could be so uninformed but was on the tractor planting at the time I was listening and unable to call and try to explain. I did submit a description by e-mail to his show but never heard any acknowledgement as to whether he ever saw it or not...
Just a sidebar story...
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KOS wrote:

Hi, Not pipe, original surveyers use iron rod driven couple feet deep. You may have them too, metal detector comes handy for that.
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In our area surveyors use a metal rod to mark property line corners. They attach a small pennant to the rod, but they are just paper or fabric so the pennants don't last too long. A piece of rebar would be good. If the line falls on concrete or asphalt, they use a metal spike, not sure of the exact size but the head is about the size of a nickel. After the markers are in place, record some measurements from features of your property to find their rough locations later. They can be difficult to find without getting "close"
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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All the surveyors in this area use a 24" piece of 3/4" rebar and are required by law to pop on a plastic cap with their name and license number. If the point happens to be in a street, curb or sidewalk they use a small round headed nail.
Ask your guy. For a small charge you may get a meaningful upgrade.
Colbyt
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In my 'weird junk' collection, I have a couple of dozen 4" long 1/2 thick pointed copper stakes, with big brass engraveable heads swaged onto them. I've always wondered if they were intended to use as corner markers- scratch or letter-stamp the info into the brass, and push into puddled concrete for a surveying monument/corner pin. I suppose they could be hammered into asphalt, on a hot day. Too short for ground rods, so I can't think of much else they would be good for. A metal dectector would certainly find them- they are heavy.
aem sends...
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More than likely. You have seen the old USGS markers, I presume?
Sounds like might have been a stash of them from an auction perhaps...
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