laminated flooring cost

Does this seem like a decent cost ? 710 square feet of laminated flooring of my choice at $3 a square foot. Installed on top of radiant heating (concrete) at a cost of $4000 ? Everything is out of the way too..all furniture and stuff is upstairs.
He recommends to leave the original baseboard trim where it is and not remove it. When the wood goes up against the trim, he will use a molding to connect the 2. Does that seem like a normal way of doing it ? I want a tight seal since I have minor radon levels down there. Would it be possible to have a better tight seal if the wood trim was removed ?
I appreciate any info, you guys have always been the best.
john
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I have had laminate installed at $1.50 - $2 per sf. Your install cost seems pretty high, unless he has to deal with a dozen doorways.
JK
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I have seen a number of installations where the flooring goes to the original baseboard and the installer throws on some quarter round after. Quite frankly I don't like the way it looks. The original baseboard looks smaller. I did one room in laminate and ripped off all of the existing baseboard myself and ran the laminate closer to the wall as per the manufacturer's specs using the spacers. In my case there was a small gap between the drywall and the floor which gave me plenty of room for expansion. I purchased all new baseboard and quarter round and primed and painted it before I installed it.
They should put down some plastic sheeting under the floor which will take care of the radon migration.
One thing I have seen many times is the installer arriving on the day of the installation with the laminate. The manufacturers recommend that the laminate be stored in the space that it will be installed in for a few days. You might be better off buying the laminate yourself and just hire someone for the installation. I have found that talking to small private showroom people was better than a big box store. Unfortunately the way the system works is that no floor covering chain will carry the same models of flooring as the big box stores. The brands may be the same, but the models are not. Make sure to get the manufacturer's name, the name of the line, and model that you like at each place.
Don't forget to ask about the transition pieces from one room to another. Some installers just cut their own from some oak. After a while it stands out from the rest of the floor. I think it is better to get the transitions that match your floor.
Get at least three quotes before making a decision.
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On Sun, 9 Mar 2008 19:02:38 -0400, "john"

Follow the installers advice. The flooring will expand and contract. The quarter round moldings he plans(?) would be caulked and touched up with paint.
Not sure about the cost...
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john wrote:

The flooring expands and contracts with temperature and humidity (laminates, not so much with humidity). There must be gaps surrounding the floor so the material can move. If you did get a "tight" seal - say through the use of glues or sealant - the wood would rip the sealant asunder as the flooring expands. The floor WILL leak (at least) around the edges.
BUT, laminate is impermeable and that's probably better than what you've got.
Back to the original issue: The floor will look better if the floorboards are removed and reset atop the laminate.
Also, you can do the job yourself for less than $1000. You'll need less than 100 curse-words.
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I just got 3/4" thick finished oak hardwood for $3.50/sq. ft. $3 for laminate seems outrageously pricey.
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He is a hack. That is the cheap way to do it and it will look like crap. A real pro will remove the baseboard and replace it when done and you can re-finish it in the garage at the time the floor is going down.
710 feet times $3 is not $4000. If that is just installation, he should be supplying your choice of KY or Vaseline too.
Before you go another step, stop and re-think things. Look at installing engineered hardwood instead of laminate. It is real wood, not some fake looking stuff. Unless you have physical limitations, consider doing the job yourself. It is really not very hard and required minimal tools. A $99 miter saw is good to have for the cuts, otherwise, a few hand tools and glue are all that is needed.
Does that seem like a normal way of doing it ? I want a

There is a barrier that has to go down first. That may help with the radon, but it is not a perfect seal on the ends. I imagine the baseboard will help, but I'm not an expert on radon.
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