Laminate Living Room into Kitchen - Height Difference

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wrote:

Ok, all this talk is all interesting and nice, but it doesn't answer my initial question. I have already decided to put laminate in the kitchen. I am aware of the issues and concerns, and I made an educated decision, derived from a number of resources. I will be putting a sealent on the joints and caulking around the edging to help keep the water out. In the event of a flood (dishwasher, etc), it won't matter what flooring I have, it'll be ruined.
My original question is how do do get the laminate to flow from the living room to the kitchen? There will be about a 4mm difference (kitchen being higher). The boards will be running straight through the opening.
This way: | | opening ] | | [ | |
Not This Way: -------------------- ] ---------------[ -------------------
TIA, Greg
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wrote:

Ok, all this talk is all interesting and nice, but it doesn't answer my initial question. I have already decided to put laminate in the kitchen. I am aware of the issues and concerns, and I made an educated decision, derived from a number of resources. I will be putting a sealent on the joints and caulking around the edging to help keep the water out. In the event of a flood (dishwasher, etc), it won't matter what flooring I have, it'll be ruined.
My original question is how do do get the laminate to flow from the living room to the kitchen? There will be about a 4mm difference (kitchen being higher). The boards will be running straight through the opening.
This way: | | opening ] | | [ | |
Not This Way: -------------------- ] ---------------[ -------------------
TIA, Greg
--
1: boards generally expand across their width and not their length, if they
do at all. if you trap the boards in the doorway, plan on it buckling there.
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Umm, make it so there isn't a difference. Build up the living room floor by 4mm so both floors are even with each other. That is what anybody with a lick of common sense would do.
What is so damned difficult about that concept?
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Greg wrote:

How old is the kitchen vinyl? If put down in last 10-15 years, odds are it is only edge-glued and will come up pretty easy. With the layer of mushy stuff that goes under laminate, the floor under it doesn't have to be perfect- you could probably get the vinyl up and scrape the high spots smooth enough in a couple of hours. That will get most of your height difference solved right there.
And no, there are lots of kitchen floors that are pretty much dishwasher-proof if properly installed, as long as it doesn't sit wet for days. Make sure new floor goes under the dishwasher so you don't trap it, and it doesn't present a raw edge to soak up water when it leaks. You want a nice tight smooth floor and caulked bottom edges of the dishwasher space, so leaks immediately run out into the room where you will notice them, instead of hiding under the cabinets.
-- aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

Oooo! Good idea!
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Greg wrote:

I would.

Put a layer of 1/8" ply (or hardboard?) under the cork.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

Well, why not use 3/8" thick cork instead of the 1/4"? Also, there is 3/8" thick ply flooring. Personlly, I'd fuss with a 4 foot level and low-angle work light to get the floor reasonably flat and smooth. Bumps and dips will telescope through the laminate for all to see.
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