laminate flooring transition strip

Quick question about the transition strip between laminate flooring & regular kitchen tile... I installed a very inexpensive laminate floor and by the time I was ready to complete the job with the transition strips, I was out of money. Home Depot charges $20 per every 3 feet of genuine wood transition strip, I just can't justify the extra cost. Why would I install a pure wood transition strip when I went with a laminate anyway? Is there a cheaper way?
Thanks,
Sean
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Can't you find some molding at HD to do the job and then stain it? Many people do that.

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You just spent $1000 or more and you cheap out to do the job the right way? Use what works best.. It may or may not be the best way, bot don't make your expensive floor look like crap to save a few dollars in the end.

Because if that is what fits, that is what you use. The factory stuff takes in most, but not all situations of what the flooring will butt to. It in common for the pro installer to mill a strip and stain it to match. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Sean,
As DanG pointed out, find a carpet installation supply store. From the local one I bought a nail down strip (like a t-molding) and a rubber insert that pops into it. I did 5 doorways for the HD price of one.
--
Colbyt
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I know exactly what you are going through. I installed a ceramic tile floor in the kitchen and then a bruce lamanent floating floor in the attached family room. The wood floor is real red oak. After much searching at Lowes and HD I finally found a solution. My floors share the same height so I used a T-style. I went with a pergo (fake wood) transition piece. It was over 9'-0 and cost around $30ish It uses a long black plastic trough/channel that you nail down first. Then you rubber mallet the tansition piece into the channel. It looks awesome. Good luck -

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Find a carpet layer's supply house in your area. Not a carpet store, not Home Depot. The store will sell adhesives, knives, rubber base, tools, and a bunch of reducers and transitions.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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When I transitioned between floors, from a hardwood to a carpet, I milled a 5/4x4" piece of oak to fit in the opening. I had removed a old threshold that existed before. What I did was cut the oak in a sort of flattened out "T" shape to fit down into the opening with the wings covering both flooring. I also beveled the edges of the top portion at around 60 degrees to assist in the transition. Wouldn't you know that shortly after this was done SWMBO thought we should have French doors there. So up came the oak, stud walls were added and French doors put in, but I used the shortened oak threshold instead of the pine the prehung doors came with.
Dave

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